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Genocide

WORLD
August 22, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
RWANDA * A former head of Rwanda's army, regarded as one of the most senior suspects facing trial in the country's 1994 genocide, pleaded not guilty before a United Nations tribunal in neighboring Tanzania. Former Maj. Gen. Augustin Bizimungu, 50, appeared angry as he responded to the charges that he conspired to exterminate Rwanda's ethnic Tutsi minority and moderate Hutus. He is also accused of forming and arming militias in the slaughter. More than 800,000 people died.
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WORLD
June 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Cambodian and international judges announced rules for a U.N.-backed genocide trial, putting aside the last major roadblock to trying former Khmer Rouge leaders. The deal was reached during a weeklong meeting that followed six months of disagreement about how to proceed, the judges said at a joint news conference in the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh. About 1.7 million people died from hunger, disease, overwork and execution under the communist Khmer Rouge during its 1975-79 reign.
WORLD
February 20, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations tribunal in Arusha, Tanzania, convicted a Rwandan pastor and his son of genocide and crimes against humanity for calling in Hutu gangs to kill minority Tutsis who had sought refuge in a Kibuye, Rwanda, church in 1994. Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, 78, pastor at the Seventh-day Adventist church, was sentenced to 10 years in prison. Gerald Ntakirutimana, 45, a doctor at the affiliated hospital, was sentenced to 25 years.
WORLD
June 20, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
RWANDA * Residents of Rwanda's capital, Kigali, met in a dusty clearing to open the first session of a community court to try neighbors accused of participating in a 1994 genocide. Survivors joined the suspects to learn procedures and schedule the weekly sessions. Similar openings were held at 12 locations across Rwanda. The courts are being used to speed up trials for the 115,000 people suspected of taking part in the massacre of more than 800,000 Tutsis and Hutu moderates.
WORLD
February 28, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Bosnia-Herzegovina accused Serbia and Montenegro of taking non-Serbs on a "path to hell" in the 1992-95 Bosnian war, as the highest U.N. court launched its first hearings into state-sponsored genocide. The International Court of Justice in The Hague opened the case 13 years after Bosnia sued the rump Yugoslav state from which it seceded in 1992, triggering a war in which at least 100,000 people were killed. If Bosnia wins, it could seek billions of dollars in compensation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2010 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
There will come a day, some said, when Armenians won't need to take to the streets in protest, and they will simply honor slain ancestors with peaceful lament. But that day didn't appear any closer Saturday, as Armenians gathered worldwide to commemorate the Armenian genocide of 1915, which claimed the lives of about 1.2 million Armenians under Ottoman-ruled Turkey. In Yerevan, Armenia's capital, hundreds of thousands laid flowers at a monument to the victims, while across Southern California, Armenian families marched, prayed and paused to remember lost great-grandparents, great-grand-uncles and great-grand-aunts —loved ones who were deported, starved, arrested and executed almost 100 years ago. The Turkish government does not recognize the genocide, and a long-debated resolution that would call for the United States to officially acknowledge the killings faces opposition in Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Armenians throughout Southern California will gather today for a series of public events to remember victims of the first-recorded genocide of the 20th century, when an estimated 1.5 million people were killed by the Turks during World War I. A protest will be held in front of the Turkish Consulate, 4801 Wilshire Blvd., at 3 p.m. Thousands are expected to march, chant and hold protest signs that call for the Turkish government's acknowledgment of the genocide, which it has long denied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
Armenian organizations throughout the Los Angeles area will begin a monthlong commemoration of the 80th anniversary of the Armenian genocide this weekend, culminating April 23 in a church service in Glendale that draws thousands of Armenians annually. Beginning in April, 1915, Turkey launched a massive extermination of Armenians in a drive to conquer its neighbor nation. The number of Armenian casualties has never been calculated, but experts believe several million lives were lost.
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
The U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague has agreed to hear genocide charges against former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic for alleged atrocities during the 1992-95 Bosnian war, a spokeswoman said Friday. Milosevic, who led Yugoslavia through four Balkan wars in the 1990s, already faces two indictments accusing him of war crimes in Croatia and in Kosovo, a province of Serbia, the dominant republic of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Defense Ministry scrapped a $200-million deal with a French company Tuesday as Turkey swiftly retaliated against a new French law recognizing as a genocide the killings of Armenians during the Ottoman Empire. The decision to cancel Dassault Aviation's contract to upgrade electronic warfare systems on 80 Turkish F-16 warplanes came immediately after French President Jacques Chirac signed the law, which was passed by Parliament on Jan. 18.
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