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Genocide

WORLD
December 12, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams
A Bosnian Serb general was convicted of genocide and other war crimes Wednesday by a United Nations tribunal in the Netherlands for his role in plotting and carrying out the murder of thousands of Muslim men in Eastern Bosnia in 1995. Zdravko Tolimir, intelligence chief and deputy to wartime Bosnian Serb commander Ratko Mladic, was found guilty of murder, persecution, deportation and genocide by a 2-1 judgment of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Tolimir, 64, was a key architect of the criminal conspiracies to eradicate Muslims from Bosnian territory coveted by Serbs, including the killing of at least 6,000 Muslim men from the purportedly U.N.-protected enclave of Srebrenica in 1995.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2012 | By Mindy Farabee
A scathing takedown of the United Nations, "U.N. Me" focuses in on dishonorable episodes in the organization's recent history - the Oil-for-Food scandal, tragic inaction when faced with genocide in Rwanda and Darfur - as part of its larger contention that peacekeeping and human rights efforts of the once noble enterprise have been rendered dangerously absurd by corruption, poor oversight of troops and self-preservation for its own sake. The film slickly packages its outrage.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2012 | By Tina Susman
A Rwandan woman living in Boston has been convicted of immigration fraud for concealing her membership in Rwanda's ruling party during that country's 1994 genocide so that she could gain entry to the United States. Her sister faces similar charges in New Hampshire. The trial of Prudence Kantengwa, 47, concluded in a Boston courtroom Monday. Meanwhile, her sister, Beatrice Munyenyezi , is in a New Hampshire jail waiting for her second trial on immigration fraud charges to begin.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2012 | By Tina Susman
With the jury unable to reach a verdict, a judge has declared a mistrial in the case of a Rwandan-born woman who was charged with covering up her role in that country's 1994 genocide in order to obtain U.S. citizenship. The trial of Beatrice Munyenyezi in Concord, N.H., had been closely watched because she was only the second Rwandan immigrant to stand trial in the United States on charges of lying on immigration applications about whether they participated in the killings of more than half a million people in the central African nation.
OPINION
March 10, 2012
In a March 5 editorial , The Times opposed a bill in the French parliament that would have made it a crime to deny the Armenian genocide. The bill was proposed by President Nicolas Sarkozy, then struck down byFrance's Constitutional Council. Now Sarkozy says he wants to revive it. Reader Berj Proodian wrote suggesting that The Times may have been hypocritical on the subject: "In the past year, the L.A. Times has printed [several] editorials condemning France's law against denying the Armenian genocide.
OPINION
March 5, 2012
If you live in a country that truly values free speech, then no matter what opinion you hold - whether it's rational or irrational - you have the right to voice it. You can deny the Holocaust happened, or that men walked on the moon, without fear that you will be brought up on criminal charges. (Of course, you still risk public rebuke or humiliation from people who hold the opinion that you are ridiculous.) That freedom is generally considered a fundamental human right. So it was reassuring when France's Constitutional Council last week struck down a proposed law that would have criminalized the denial or minimizing of the genocide of Armenians at the hands of Ottoman Turks in the early 20th century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Survivors of Armenian genocide victims can't sue German insurance companies for failing to pay claims because only the federal government can bring foreign entities to court, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday. The 11-judge panel dismissed the case brought nearly a decade ago by Southern California Armenians, probably putting an end to their efforts to compel the German companies to pay survivors' benefits on policies sold to victims between 1875 and 1923. A 2000 revision to California's Civil Code allowed California courts to consider the Armenians' insurance claims beyond the deadline for petitioning for payouts by subsidiaries of the German insurance company now known as Munich Re. "The Constitution gives the federal government the exclusive authority to administer foreign affairs," the appeals court said in a unanimous ruling.
OPINION
January 31, 2012
The genocide issue Re "Genocide bill riles Turkey," Jan. 28 The Armenian genocide question will not go away in France or in Turkey until the genocide is recorded, recognized and honored with dignity in Turkey. Getting to this point has taken nearly 100 years of parrying Turkish opinion that the killing of more than 1 million Armenians starting in 1915 does not meet the legal standard of genocide - intent to exterminate a race or a group - although many historians agree it does.
WORLD
January 27, 2012 | By J. Michael Kennedy, Los Angeles Times
The object of the game is to see how hard a hand on the computer screen can slap a cartoon image of French President Nicolas Sarkozy. It made its debut only hours after the French Senate passed legislation Monday that would criminalize denial of the Armenian genocide. That bill has caused a furor in Turkey, further damaging a relationship chilled by Sarkozy's staunch opposition to Turkey's long-standing bid for membership in the European Union. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared it racist and a "massacre of free thought.
OPINION
January 19, 2012 | By Timothy Garton Ash
On Monday, the French Senate is scheduled to debate and possibly vote on a bill that would criminalize denial of the Armenian genocide of 1915, along with any other events recognized as genocide in French law. The bill has passed the lower house of Parliament. The Senate should reject it, in the name of free speech, the freedom of historical inquiry and Article 11 of France's pathbreaking 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen ("The free communication of ideas and opinions is one of the most precious rights.…")
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