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Gentrification

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Marisa Gerber
Sgt. Victor Arellano drove slowly through the hills of Echo Park, cruising by the places where he had seen the guys hanging out in the past. There was the market painted bright yellow with large green letters spelling out "BEER WINE" and the hidden staircase nearby. The graffitied stretch of pavement along Preston Avenue and the house where a known gangster lives. A few hours into his evening shift and the LAPD gang officer still hadn't spotted any members of the Echo Park Locos.
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NEWS
May 7, 1992 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The rioting that engulfed parts of Los Angeles last week leaped across town to the Oakwood section of Venice, leaving a trail of smashed windows, looted stores and renewed tension over gentrification, an issue that stirs up the racially mixed community. The property damage was minimal compared with other hot spots in the region, although by the weekend National Guard patrols had moved in with armored vehicles to bolster local police.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | BETH DUFF-BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jerline Edwards isn't budging, no matter how much the young professionals and developers in this resort town offer for her crumbling clapboard houses that have been in her family for five generations. "No, we're not selling. The money would go to the devil and you have no place to stay," says the 69-year-old Edwards. "They're going to force us out anyhow. As sure as the devil, I'm telling you. We all lived as one when we were coming up--the Cubans, the conchs and the Nassaus.
NEWS
April 3, 1985 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
After living 35 years in the same North Beach apartment, Frances Brandolino and her husband discovered there was no longer room for them in this city. A group of lawyers bought the 17-unit Victorian building in which they had been living to convert it into offices. Unable to find a place they could afford in San Francisco, the Brandolinos ended up in the suburb of Brisbane, where the $500-a-month rent still is more than twice what it was in their rent-controlled North Beach apartment.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bixby Knolls is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Long Beach, and it looks it. If you want to travel in time back to 1948, take a stroll around the Bixby Knolls Shopping Center, which has not changed in physical appearance since Dewey thought he beat Truman. The elderly residents of the greater Bixby Knolls area have been dying off in recent years, and young professional families have moved in by the scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1986 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
Sherman Way in Canoga Park is as frumpy as any Valley boulevard, a seemingly endless strip of gas stations, apartment buildings and thrift shops that appear to have been Xeroxed instead of built. It has neither a Bullock's nor a Bloomingdale's. Yet, on almost any weekend, Sherman Way between Owensmouth and Canoga is busy with upscale browsers. OK. "Busy" is too strong a word. Melrose Avenue it ain't.
TRAVEL
October 13, 1996 | NANCY ZASLAVSKY, Zaslavasky is the author of "A Cook's Tour of Mexico" and the upcoming "Meatless Mexican Home Cooking."
This city, often called Mexico's Disneyland by Yankees, is every traveler's Mexican Fantasyland--a drop-dead gorgeous colonial hilltop town. The town's main church, La Parroquia, is the most prominent landmark and can easily be compared to a certain Sleeping Beauty's Castle, especially when it's lighted on weekend and holiday evenings.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1995 | JONATHAN WEBER
When Will Hearst, scion of the famed newspaper family, unveiled a new venture called @Home earlier this year, he seemed to be proposing the solution to every Internet surfer's dream. By offering access to the global computer network via big, fat cable television lines that can transmit data a thousand times faster than standard phone wires, @Home promises to transform the very nature of the Internet, and especially the graphics-rich part of it known as the World Wide Web.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2008 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
In the beige linoleum hallway, a fluorescent light flickers on and off as a woman saunters over to visit her neighbor. The elevator creaks and whines, then frees a gaggle of giggling girls. Downstairs in the laundry room, a young mother sorts her children's clothes, enjoying the room's warmth on a blustery day. But for this west Bronx apartment building's residents, the comfort of home may not last.
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