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BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | From A Times Staff Writer
Registered users of Yahoo Inc.'s GeoCities Web service called off a boycott of the company after it overhauled a policy that appeared to claim rights to content that they post on their personal Web pages. The change, the second attempt in a week to appease angry users, appeared to end a 10-day dispute stemming from Yahoo's recent acquisition of GeoCities, where 4.6 million members have erected personal Web sites.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Yahoo Inc.'s GeoCities unit, the biggest service that lets consumers set up their own Internet sites, said it will charge users for two new expanded versions of its free basic service. Yahoo will charge $8.95 a month for GeoCities Pro, $11.95 a month for GeoCities Webmaster and a $15 setup fee for both. GeoCities Pro and Webmaster provide personalized domain names, multiple e-mail accounts and more data storage than the basic service, a spokesman said. Sunnyvale, Calif.
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BUSINESS
May 28, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Yahoo Inc. is planning to close its $2.94-billion acquisition of GeoCities today after GeoCities shareholders vote to approve the deal in Marina del Rey this morning. Five GeoCities shareholders who collectively hold a stake of about 60% have agreed to support the merger, so approval of the deal is assured.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | From A Times Staff Writer
Registered users of Yahoo Inc.'s GeoCities Web service called off a boycott of the company after it overhauled a policy that appeared to claim rights to content that they post on their personal Web pages. The change, the second attempt in a week to appease angry users, appeared to end a 10-day dispute stemming from Yahoo's recent acquisition of GeoCities, where 4.6 million members have erected personal Web sites.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Yahoo Inc.'s GeoCities unit, the biggest service that lets consumers set up their own Internet sites, said it will charge users for two new expanded versions of its free basic service. Yahoo will charge $8.95 a month for GeoCities Pro, $11.95 a month for GeoCities Webmaster and a $15 setup fee for both. GeoCities Pro and Webmaster provide personalized domain names, multiple e-mail accounts and more data storage than the basic service, a spokesman said. Sunnyvale, Calif.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1998 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a groundbreaking case that strikes at the heart of consumers' growing fears about online privacy, GeoCities settled government charges Thursday that it collected personal information about its customers, including children, then sold the data to marketers in violation of its own stated privacy policies. The case marks the first time government regulators have formally accused any site on the Internet, let alone one as popular as GeoCities with its 2 million members, of such deception.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1998 | Jennifer Oldham
Santa Monica-based GeoCities, a provider of World Wide Web home pages, said it will provide tools to allow its 1.4 million members to build electronic storefronts. It said the new service, dubbed GeoShops, which capitalizes on partnerships with transaction service provider Internet Commerce Services and software maker OpenMarket, will help it further tap into the fast-growing electronic commerce market.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Employees at GeoCities in Marina del Rey will find out today whether they will have jobs with the company after it completes it $3.9-billion merger with Yahoo Inc. At least some of GeoCities' roughly 300 employees are expected to receive pink slips, and some others will be asked to relocate to Yahoo's headquarters in Santa Clara. The news will be relayed at an off-site meeting this morning, according to people familiar with the plans. GeoCities executives had no official comment Monday.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1998 | From Washington Post
In their push to reach mass audiences, large Web site operators are developing dynamic "group publishing" software that has caught the attention of tens of thousands of families, hobbyists, clubs, civic groups and small businesses. The trend is taking vanity publishing to a new level, letting people create private virtual worlds--interactive forums where friends and family can chat, post messages and share calendars and address books.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN and CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
GeoCities, the Marina del Rey company that pioneered the business of building communities on the Internet, won a major endorsement of its Internet strategy Thursday when it agreed to be acquired by Yahoo in an all-stock deal valued at $3.9 billion. The agreement, which combines two of the World Wide Web's most popular destinations, would be the largest acquisition involving a Southern California Internet start-up. It also would solidify Santa Clara, Calif.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Internet users who have erected personal Web sites at GeoCities reacted angrily Tuesday after learning that the contents of their sites will belong to Yahoo Inc. as part of the merger between the two companies. The new policy, spelled out in the "terms of service" for members of the community sites offered by the newly combined company, gives Yahoo the "perpetual, irrevocable" right to any material on GeoCities pages. The change affects about 4.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Yahoo Inc. is planning to close its $2.94-billion acquisition of GeoCities today after GeoCities shareholders vote to approve the deal in Marina del Rey this morning. Five GeoCities shareholders who collectively hold a stake of about 60% have agreed to support the merger, so approval of the deal is assured.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1999 | Karen Kaplan
Employees at GeoCities in Marina del Rey will find out today whether they will have jobs with the company after it completes it $3.9-billion merger with Yahoo Inc. At least some of GeoCities' roughly 300 employees are expected to receive pink slips, and some others will be asked to relocate to Yahoo's headquarters in Santa Clara. The news will be relayed at an off-site meeting this morning, according to people familiar with the plans. GeoCities executives had no official comment Monday.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1999 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First-quarter profit from operations at Yahoo Inc. surged to $25 million from $3.3 million a year earlier as the largest Internet search site--and one of the precious few to make any money--added new services, new advertisers and new countries. The Santa Clara, Calif.-based company said revenue tripled to $86 million and profit reached 11 cents a diluted share before charges related to some of its recent acquisitions.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN and CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
GeoCities, the Marina del Rey company that pioneered the business of building communities on the Internet, won a major endorsement of its Internet strategy Thursday when it agreed to be acquired by Yahoo in an all-stock deal valued at $3.9 billion. The agreement, which combines two of the World Wide Web's most popular destinations, would be the largest acquisition involving a Southern California Internet start-up. It also would solidify Santa Clara, Calif.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1998 | From Washington Post
In their push to reach mass audiences, large Web site operators are developing dynamic "group publishing" software that has caught the attention of tens of thousands of families, hobbyists, clubs, civic groups and small businesses. The trend is taking vanity publishing to a new level, letting people create private virtual worlds--interactive forums where friends and family can chat, post messages and share calendars and address books.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Tech Coast will be hosting a coming out party of sorts next week, when two of its marquee Internet companies--GeoCities and CitySearch--offer their shares to the public for the first time. The pair of initial public offerings is expected to grab the attention of Wall Street and venture capitalists, who have long been accused of overlooking high-tech companies here in favor of their counterparts in the flashier Silicon Valley.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
GeoCities, which runs advertising-supported Internet "communities," filed plans Friday to go public, a day after agreeing to settle federal charges about the way it collects and uses personal information on children. The widely anticipated initial public offering comes amid booming demand for Internet stocks. The sale could raise as much as $72.5 million, the company said in its filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, without specifying the number of shares to be sold or the price.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1998 | DEBORA VRANA
Robert Greenberg isn't waiting for the other shoe to drop. He's in the middle of structuring a first-time stock offering for the second hip shoe company he has founded in the last two decades. Manhattan Beach-based Skechers USA Inc., the shoemaker he co-founded in 1992 with his son Michael, has filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission for an initial public offering, or IPO, of as much as $115 million through BT Alex. Brown & Sons. Greenberg helped start L.A.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1998 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a groundbreaking case that strikes at the heart of consumers' growing fears about online privacy, GeoCities settled government charges Thursday that it collected personal information about its customers, including children, then sold the data to marketers in violation of its own stated privacy policies. The case marks the first time government regulators have formally accused any site on the Internet, let alone one as popular as GeoCities with its 2 million members, of such deception.
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