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George Duke

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
George Duke doesn't make a lot of appearances in clubs, more commonly turning up in large-venue engagements--most recently at Universal Amphitheatre with the Montreux 2000 all-star show. Every couple of years or so, however, he seems to feel the need to get into the trenches, experience some direct contact with his fans, and enjoy the casual, free-spirited atmosphere of a gig in a jazz room.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Keyboardist George Duke, one of the pioneers of the jazz fusion movement that merged jazz, rock and funk in the late 1960s and 1970s, died Monday night in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his record label announced. He was 67. In a career stretching over five decades, Duke collaborated with an array of other musicians, among them Frank Zappa, Miles Davis, Barry Manilow, Dizzy Gillespie, Al Jarreau, Don Ellis, Cannonball Adderly, Nancy Wilson and Joe Williams.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Give George Duke credit for one thing: He knows how to work a crowd. On Tuesday, in the opening set of a six-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill, he was the consummate performer. Structuring most of his quartet's appearance around his just-released new album, "After Hours" (Warner Bros.), he entertained the full house by mixing a running narrative of a romantic evening with his highly suggestive music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Keyboardist George Duke, one of the pioneers of the jazz-fusion movement that merged jazz, rock and funk in the late 1960s and 1970s, died Monday in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his record label announced. He was 67. The Northern California native was one of the leading forces in bringing jazz and rock together, genres that not only were typically separate in the 1950s and early '60s, but whose proponents often were philosophically at odds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Listening to bassist Stanley Clarke and keyboardist George Duke talk about the first time they met reveals a lot about the way they work together. Duke: "It was 1971." Clarke: "George was with Cannonball (Adderley). I was with Chick (Corea). Was it Finland?" Duke: "Yep. Pori Jazz Festival." Clarke: "Some hotel. George had a big Afro then; I had a big Afro. Two big Afros walking down the hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One night late last year, George Duke had just settled into his first-class seat for the flight from San Francisco to L.A. when he recognized a fellow traveler nearby--rapper Ice Cube. "We hadn't met before," Duke recalled recently on the phone from his home-studio in North Hollywood. "So I said, 'Hey, you're Ice Cube. I'm George Duke. You sampled one of my songs. Made me a lot of money.'
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Think of George Duke and the first word that comes to mind is "versatility." In his nearly four-decade career, the California-born keyboardist has performed with everyone from Frank Zappa and Julian "Cannonball" Adderley to Miles Davis, Smoky Robinson and Natalie Cole. Beyond all his awards and accomplishments, and his easy role shifting from musician to producer to record executive, Duke's live performances are intriguing in a very different way.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By Mark Sachs, Los Angeles Times
Grammy-winning jazz artist George Duke has worked with jazz musicians from A, as in Cannonball Adderley, to Z, as in Frank Zappa. He's produced hits for artists including Jeffrey Osborne ("Stay With Me Tonight," "On the Wings of Love") and Deniece Williams ("Let's Hear It for the Boy"), and he has a fresh album of his own out, "Déjà Vu. " But Saturday night at UCLA's Royce Hall, he'll be doing something a bit different, blending American jazz with European orchestral traditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012
MUSIC The multifaceted George Duke Fusion/Funk Band brings its genre-bending sound to Hollywood for a three-night stand, just in time to celebrate Duke's own birthday. Catalina Jazz Club, 6725 W. Sunset Blvd., L.A. 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat. $25-$35 (dinner or two-drink minimum required). (323) 466-2210. http://www.catalinajazzclub.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A single burning question was asked repeatedly during keyboardist George Duke's first of two shows Friday at the Hyatt Newporter's outdoor amphitheater: "What's the score?" That the concert was held during an NBA finals game may have explained why less than half of the seats in the pastoral Newport Beach performance space were occupied. "How many basketball fans do we have here tonight?" Duke wanted to know early on. He was greeted with cheers and a nearly unanimous show of hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2013 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
The lineup for the 35th annual Playboy Jazz Festival has been announced, and in addition to the weekend-long concert's signature mix of jazz, funk and R&B, the festival also revealed that comic and former late-night host George Lopez will take over for longtime host Bill Cosby this year. Cosby had served as master of ceremonies at the festival since 1979, and last year the comedy legend stepped down after becoming as much a part of the show's fabric as the Hollywood Bowl, parasols and picnic baskets.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012
MUSIC The multifaceted George Duke Fusion/Funk Band brings its genre-bending sound to Hollywood for a three-night stand, just in time to celebrate Duke's own birthday. Catalina Jazz Club, 6725 W. Sunset Blvd., L.A. 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat. $25-$35 (dinner or two-drink minimum required). (323) 466-2210. http://www.catalinajazzclub.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By Mark Sachs, Los Angeles Times
Grammy-winning jazz artist George Duke has worked with jazz musicians from A, as in Cannonball Adderley, to Z, as in Frank Zappa. He's produced hits for artists including Jeffrey Osborne ("Stay With Me Tonight," "On the Wings of Love") and Deniece Williams ("Let's Hear It for the Boy"), and he has a fresh album of his own out, "Déjà Vu. " But Saturday night at UCLA's Royce Hall, he'll be doing something a bit different, blending American jazz with European orchestral traditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Think of George Duke and the first word that comes to mind is "versatility." In his nearly four-decade career, the California-born keyboardist has performed with everyone from Frank Zappa and Julian "Cannonball" Adderley to Miles Davis, Smoky Robinson and Natalie Cole. Beyond all his awards and accomplishments, and his easy role shifting from musician to producer to record executive, Duke's live performances are intriguing in a very different way.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
George Duke doesn't make a lot of appearances in clubs, more commonly turning up in large-venue engagements--most recently at Universal Amphitheatre with the Montreux 2000 all-star show. Every couple of years or so, however, he seems to feel the need to get into the trenches, experience some direct contact with his fans, and enjoy the casual, free-spirited atmosphere of a gig in a jazz room.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Give George Duke credit for one thing: He knows how to work a crowd. On Tuesday, in the opening set of a six-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill, he was the consummate performer. Structuring most of his quartet's appearance around his just-released new album, "After Hours" (Warner Bros.), he entertained the full house by mixing a running narrative of a romantic evening with his highly suggestive music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Keyboardist George Duke, one of the pioneers of the jazz fusion movement that merged jazz, rock and funk in the late 1960s and 1970s, died Monday night in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his record label announced. He was 67. In a career stretching over five decades, Duke collaborated with an array of other musicians, among them Frank Zappa, Miles Davis, Barry Manilow, Dizzy Gillespie, Al Jarreau, Don Ellis, Cannonball Adderly, Nancy Wilson and Joe Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Keyboardist George Duke, one of the pioneers of the jazz-fusion movement that merged jazz, rock and funk in the late 1960s and 1970s, died Monday in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his record label announced. He was 67. The Northern California native was one of the leading forces in bringing jazz and rock together, genres that not only were typically separate in the 1950s and early '60s, but whose proponents often were philosophically at odds.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A single burning question was asked repeatedly during keyboardist George Duke's first of two shows Friday at the Hyatt Newporter's outdoor amphitheater: "What's the score?" That the concert was held during an NBA finals game may have explained why less than half of the seats in the pastoral Newport Beach performance space were occupied. "How many basketball fans do we have here tonight?" Duke wanted to know early on. He was greeted with cheers and a nearly unanimous show of hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One night late last year, George Duke had just settled into his first-class seat for the flight from San Francisco to L.A. when he recognized a fellow traveler nearby--rapper Ice Cube. "We hadn't met before," Duke recalled recently on the phone from his home-studio in North Hollywood. "So I said, 'Hey, you're Ice Cube. I'm George Duke. You sampled one of my songs. Made me a lot of money.'
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