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George E Locke

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2005 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Weeks before the highest-paid doctor at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center was allowed to retire, auditors found that he had racked up nearly $11,000 in surgeries and medical tests that he didn't pay for and, month after month, exaggerated the hours he worked. Dr. George E. Locke, former chairman of neurosciences, resigned in February after reaching a confidential deal with Los Angeles County, which owns the hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2005 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Weeks before the highest-paid doctor at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center was allowed to retire, auditors found that he had racked up nearly $11,000 in surgeries and medical tests that he didn't pay for and, month after month, exaggerated the hours he worked. Dr. George E. Locke, former chairman of neurosciences, resigned in February after reaching a confidential deal with Los Angeles County, which owns the hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996
Continuing his remarkable recovery, teacher Alfredo Perez spoke his first words Wednesday and his doctor said he will probably leave the hospital Friday and enter a rehabilitation facility. "He said 'OK,' " said Dr. George E. Locke, chairman of neurosurgery at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, where Perez has been treated since he was shot in the head by a stray bullet Feb. 22 in front of his students at Figueroa Street Elementary School in South-Central Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eight days after being shot in the brain and given little chance of survival, teacher Alfredo Perez has made remarkable progress and may be transferred to a rehabilitation facility as early as next week, doctors at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center said Friday. "He wrote his name last night. He is even occasionally smiling," said Dr. George E. Locke, head of neurosurgery at the hospital. "He is doing excellent," said Dr. Taghi Tirgari, the neurosurgeon who performed a three-hour operation on Perez on Feb. 22 after the Figueroa Street Elementary School teacher was struck by a stray bullet in front of his fifth-grade students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eight days after being shot in the brain and given little chance of survival, teacher Alfredo Perez has made remarkable progress and may be transferred to a rehabilitation facility as early as next week, doctors at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center said Friday. "He wrote his name last night. He is even occasionally smiling," said Dr. George E. Locke, head of neurosurgery at the hospital. "He is doing excellent," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1996 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite contacting pneumonia, wounded schoolteacher Alfredo Perez has continued to improve and was transferred out of intensive care Friday, said physicians at Martin Luther King/Drew Medical Center. "He's doing better," said his wife, Virginia, who has lived at the hospital since Feb. 22 when her husband was struck in the brain by a stray bullet fired by an alleged gang member. At the time, Perez was with his fifth-grade class in the library of Figueroa Elementary School.
OPINION
June 7, 2005
Last week brought new developments in two long-running scandals, one involving county-owned Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, the other Los Angeles City Hall. In both cases, the rip-offs of taxpayers (and betrayal of the public's trust) appeared to be astonishingly routine, blatant and unconstrained. Perhaps that's because government responses to the scams have been slow, cautious and limited. In Scandal No. 1, Times reporters uncovered a county memo relating how Dr. George E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When paramedics wheeled a little-known schoolteacher into the emergency room of Martin Luther King/Drew Medical Center three weeks ago, doctors looked at the gaping bullet hole above his right eye and didn't think he could survive. Thursday, Alfredo Perez, now the most famous elementary school teacher in Los Angeles, was wheeled out of the hospital, smiling briefly at a throng of well-wishers, curious bystanders and news media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2005 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Two prominent physicians at troubled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center have left the hospital. Dr. George E. Locke, who started working at the hospital in 1974, retired as chairman of the neurosciences department, and Dr. James K. Brannon resigned as an orthopedic surgeon. The doctors' departures come as King/Drew struggles to fix myriad problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2005 | Jack Leonard and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Doctors and medical staff at the troubled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center are among the highest-paid employees of Los Angeles County, making up more than a quarter of the top 100. Top-dollar annual incomes -- ranging from nearly $180,000 to more than $239,000 -- were paid to 25 doctors and one nurse manager at the hospital last year, the same time the facility failed accreditation inspections and almost lost federal funding because of persistent lapses in patient care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2005 | Charles Ornstein and Tracy Weber, Times Staff Writers
Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center paid more than $1.3 million over the last year for the services of a radiologist who said he worked an average of 20 hours a day, seven days a week, during one recent six-month stretch, records show. Los Angeles County health officials said Monday that they have launched an investigation into the marathon work hours of Dr. Harold A. Tate, who was employed under a contract at the hospital. The county has paid Reliable Health Care Services Inc.
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