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George Gascon

Nine law enforcement officials, almost all current or former members of the Los Angeles Police Department, confirmed in interviews Wednesday that they are among a short list of candidates for the chief's position. The position opened up when Chief Bernard C. Parks stepped down after the Police Commission's highly controversial decision to deny him a second five-year term. The chief commands more than 9,000 officers responsible for policing 467 square miles.
June 28, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police Chief William J. Bratton said Tuesday that he is appointing Deputy Chief Earl Paysinger as assistant chief to head the Office of Operations, a key position that oversees two-thirds of the department and is involved in developing crime-fighting strategies. Paysinger, who currently heads the South Bureau, is taking over for Assistant Chief George Gascon, who is leaving to join the Mesa, Ariz., Police Department.
June 15, 2012 | Lee Romney and Maria L. La Ganga
Attorneys for the San Francisco couple are calling it "every parent's nightmare. " Barry Laprell Gilton and Lupe Mercado watched, dismayed and helpless, as their 17-year-old daughter was lured away from home by a known Compton gang member, who became her pimp. The couple tried to persuade the teenager to break ties with 22-year-old Calvin Sneed. They sought help from law enforcement -- to no avail -- and later added the girl to several missing and exploited children registries, according to their lawyers.
June 17, 2009 | Associated Press
Mayor Gavin Newsom says he has chosen Mesa, Ariz., Police Chief George Gascon as the city's next chief of police. Newsom told the San Francisco Chronicle on Tuesday that Gascon, a former LAPD assistant police chief, is a "nuts-and-bolts-type of chief, a cop's cop and very active in community policing." Gascon, 55, has been Mesa's police chief since 2006. In L.A., Gascon was instrumental in helping Chief William J. Bratton devise a scientific crime-fighting strategy that many credit with the city's drop in crime over the last few years.
January 13, 2005 | Richard Winton and Natasha Lee, Times Staff Writers
In a week when winter storms caused widespread devastation, there was one bright spot: The rains seem to have put a damper on crime. Violent crime last week -- when it rained for four of seven days -- was down 23% in Los Angeles and property crime dropped by a quarter compared to the same week last year. Police and social scientists were not surprised, saying that they have long known that weather affects criminal behavior.
An Altadena neighborhood group has won a state award for community organization against crime. The California Stop Crime Coalition, whose members are appointed by the governor, selected the Royce Street Neighborhood Watch for a Governor's Crime Prevention Award. Sheriff's Lt. John Samuel told the Altadena Town Council on Tuesday that the West Altadena street has come a long way. "A year ago," Samuel said, "Royce Street was ridden with crime and blatant drug dealing.
August 30, 1997
Daude Sherrills, one of the architects of the 1992 Watts gang peace treaty, was released from jail Friday after his arrest for battery on a police officer during a ruckus at the Jordan Downs public housing project sparked when a woman got a parking ticket. The Wednesday afternoon incident began when a woman, Tasha Barrett, loudly objected to getting a ticket for illegally parking her car on the front lawn of her apartment building, residents and police said.
June 21, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday endorsed the creation of a unit to ensure that new buildings in Los Angeles are designed to help prevent crime, including, in some cases, the use of extensive lighting and surveillance cameras. Assistant Chief George Gascon said the proposal, which requires City Council approval, reflects a recognition that new approaches are needed to sustain the large reductions in crime that Los Angeles has experienced in recent years.
March 8, 2003 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton has fired a high-ranking deputy, fueling speculation that more dismissals could follow. Roger Ham, commanding officer of the Los Angeles Police Department's Information and Communications Service Bureau, is a civilian who served at the level of deputy chief. Ham's dismissal was not because of his performance, said Deputy Chief George Gascon. Rather, "it indicates the organization is going in a different direction," Gascon said.
September 26, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Another top advisor to Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton has quit: This time Deputy Chief Michael Berkow has accepted the job as chief of the Savannah-Chatham Police Department in Georgia, officials announced Monday. Berkow, who heads the Los Angeles Police Department's Professional Standards Bureau, announced his departure a month after Assistant Chief George Gascon left to head the police department in Mesa, Ariz.
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