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George Kessinger

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
George Kessinger's quest to carry out God's will brought him to Goodwill, where he has spent nearly 30 years helping some of the neediest members of society find dignity through work. Kessinger joined Goodwill Industries after completing his master's of divinity at Drew University Theological School in Madison, N.J. His father had been a Methodist minister in small towns throughout Missouri, but he was more interested in "shirt-sleeve" or "down-on-the-street" religion, as he calls it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2001 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To understand how an Ozarks boy like George Kessinger made it to the top of Goodwill Industries International requires all of an hour. First, there's his Dagwood Bumstead charm, which sneaks up slowly as he unfurls his life story. His birth in a tar-paper shack in Neosho, Mo., no heat or bathroom, the family sleeping clothed to keep warm. His first job at 11, digging up earthworms for a penny each to save up for a ham radio.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2001 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To understand how an Ozarks boy like George Kessinger made it to the top of Goodwill Industries International requires all of an hour. First, there's his Dagwood Bumstead charm, which sneaks up slowly as he unfurls his life story. His birth in a tar-paper shack in Neosho, Mo., no heat or bathroom, the family sleeping clothed to keep warm. His first job at 11, digging up earthworms for a penny each to save up for a ham radio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2001 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To understand how an Ozarks boy like George Kessinger made it to the top of Goodwill Industries International requires all of an hour. First, there's his Dagwood Bumstead charm, which sneaks up slowly as he unfurls his life story: His birth in a tar paper shack in Neosho, Mo., with no heat or bathroom. His first job at 11, digging up earthworms for a penny each to save for a ham radio. Working his way through college and divinity school and being ordained as a Methodist minister.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2001 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To understand how an Ozarks boy like George Kessinger made it to the top of Goodwill Industries International requires all of an hour. First, there's his Dagwood Bumstead charm, which sneaks up slowly as he unfurls his life story: His birth in a tar paper shack in Neosho, Mo., with no heat or bathroom. His first job at 11, digging up earthworms for a penny each to save for a ham radio. Working his way through college and divinity school and being ordained as a Methodist minister.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George W. Kessinger, president of Goodwill Industries International's Orange County operations for a decade, was appointed Wednesday as president and chief executive of the organization worldwide, officials said. Kessinger "puts Goodwill's mission into action every day," Carl Hansen, chairman of the headquarters' board, said in a prepared statement. The new chief executive, who begins his job June 1, could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1987
George W. Kessinger, president of Goodwill Industries of Orange County, has been appointed to the Executive Council of Goodwill Industries of America Inc., Conference of Executives. Kessinger has been with Goodwill since 1969. He has served as president of Goodwill's agencies in Charleston, W. Va., and Kansas City, Mo., and has been with the Santa Ana-based Orange County agency for the last 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1990
Goodwill Industries is making recycling even easier by opening a new drop-off station in Yorba Linda that will serve as both a collection center for usable clothing and as a certified recycling center for household containers. The new donation center, located next to Stater Bros. at the corner of Yorba Linda Boulevard and Lakeview Street, is now open from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. seven days a week.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The board of the Orange County Chamber of Commerce has elected Thomas Wilck, president of an Irvine public relations firm, as its 1993 chairman. Wilck, who will act as head of one of the county's oldest and largest trade organizations, said he wants to work to improve the business climate. "Too often, we disassociate businesses and jobs. We need to remember, and remind the public that the only place jobs come from is (through) businesses," Wilck said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1985 | Don Smith
Howard Gensler of Huntington Beach, former assistant dean of the Northrop University School of Law in Inglewood, has been appointed dean of the school, succeeding Carl Sederholm. The new dean received his law degree from UC Berkeley, has a master's degree in public policy from Berkeley and five undergraduate degrees from UC Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George W. Kessinger, president of Goodwill Industries International's Orange County operations for a decade, was appointed Wednesday as president and chief executive of the organization worldwide, officials said. Kessinger "puts Goodwill's mission into action every day," Carl Hansen, chairman of the headquarters' board, said in a prepared statement. The new chief executive, who begins his job June 1, could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
George Kessinger's quest to carry out God's will brought him to Goodwill, where he has spent nearly 30 years helping some of the neediest members of society find dignity through work. Kessinger joined Goodwill Industries after completing his master's of divinity at Drew University Theological School in Madison, N.J. His father had been a Methodist minister in small towns throughout Missouri, but he was more interested in "shirt-sleeve" or "down-on-the-street" religion, as he calls it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1988 | MARK LANDSBAUM
In Orange County, a land of affluence where the median family income is $44,000, the average household donates a mere $182, or 0.4% of its annual income, to charitable causes, according to the 1988 Orange County Annual Survey released Monday. This is even less than the $262, or 0.6% of annual income, reported in 1987, which paled by comparison with the national average found in two recent surveys. A study entitled "Giving U.S.A.," a 1987 annual report on philanthropy by the American Assn.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Business Journal is about to gain 500 subscribers in one swoop. Beginning March 8, the business publication will add a two-page monthly supplement written and paid for by the Orange County Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Called The Business Agenda, the supplement is intended to serve as the chamber's newsletter. The chamber will also pay to have the Business Journal delivered each week to about 500 of its members who do not already subscribe.
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