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George Kiseda

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2007 | Mark Heisler, Times Staff Writer
George Kiseda, a cult figure in sports journalism who helped make it possible to put the words "crusading" and "sportswriter" in the same sentence, died early Sunday at an Alzheimer's care facility in San Juan Capistrano. He was 80. Kiseda had been in failing health for some time with a degenerative illness called Lewy body disease, said Liz Pataki, a longtime friend.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2007 | Mark Heisler, Times Staff Writer
George Kiseda, a cult figure in sports journalism who helped make it possible to put the words "crusading" and "sportswriter" in the same sentence, died early Sunday at an Alzheimer's care facility in San Juan Capistrano. He was 80. Kiseda had been in failing health for some time with a degenerative illness called Lewy body disease, said Liz Pataki, a longtime friend.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1999
Alan Greenspan can't stand to see workers get a raise. He would have loved the Depression. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2000
I think I've found an inexpensive antidote for the e-mail virus. It's called a stamp. Costs only 33 cents. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1986
They sell insurance at airports. When are they going to start selling insurance at RTD bus stops? GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2000
I think I've found an inexpensive antidote for the e-mail virus. It's called a stamp. Costs only 33 cents. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991
Headline of April 22: "Violence Over the Weekend Takes 15 Lives." Headline of April 26: "L.A. a Safe City, Bradley Assures Japanese." On his way to the Hall of Fame for Frequent Flyers, how would Mayor Bradley know whether the streets of Los Angeles are safe? GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
SPORTS
October 23, 1985
Nobody could say the Galloping Gaels were without rhyme or reason. I remember them coming to Pittsburgh to play Duquesne. One year they featured a hotshot halfback, Presto Podesto from Modesto. The next year they featured another hotshot halfback, Gonzalo Morales from Nogales. I kid you not. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996
I haven't heard a peep recently from the experts who were telling us it would be a good idea to invest Social Security Trust Fund revenues in the stock market. I wonder why. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997
F. Sherwood Rowland (Oct. 20) won a Nobel Prize for research demonstrating that aerosol shaving cans were destroying the ozone. If that is so, maybe somebody else can win a Nobel Prize by showing how it is that the biggest hole in the ozone is over Antarctica. Who were all those people standing outside their igloos while they shaved? It's enough to give anybody the shivers. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1999
Alan Greenspan can't stand to see workers get a raise. He would have loved the Depression. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
BUSINESS
November 29, 1998
According to "Russian Budget Is Beyond 'Deficit' " [Nov. 21], the shortfall is so serious that the word "deficit" is no longer adequate. Their chief economic guru says they need a new word. Haven't they learned anything from us? You call it a surplus. That's what Congress (with White House acquiescence) does. They borrow (steal?) from the Social Security trust fund and--presto--no more deficit. You say the Russians don't have a Social Security trust fund? Well, don't tell anybody, but neither do we. The money is gone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997
F. Sherwood Rowland (Oct. 20) won a Nobel Prize for research demonstrating that aerosol shaving cans were destroying the ozone. If that is so, maybe somebody else can win a Nobel Prize by showing how it is that the biggest hole in the ozone is over Antarctica. Who were all those people standing outside their igloos while they shaved? It's enough to give anybody the shivers. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996
I haven't heard a peep recently from the experts who were telling us it would be a good idea to invest Social Security Trust Fund revenues in the stock market. I wonder why. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
NEWS
November 3, 1995
In "Purgatory" (Oct. 20), the theologians seem to have overlooked the obvious. Isn't it just possible that this is Purgatory? That we're in Purgatory? Right now. Today. Every day. How else can you explain car alarms at 2 a.m., boomboxes, Howard Stern, lawyers, Congress, the National Rifle Assn., tattoos, Jerry Springer, anchorperson chitchat, TV weatherpeople, recorded messages with the menu delivered in 13 languages, those wackos crawling around in the woods with greasepaint on their faces, those wackos walking around with rings in their noses . . . ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991
Headline of April 22: "Violence Over the Weekend Takes 15 Lives." Headline of April 26: "L.A. a Safe City, Bradley Assures Japanese." On his way to the Hall of Fame for Frequent Flyers, how would Mayor Bradley know whether the streets of Los Angeles are safe? GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1986
Let me sort this out: Ronald Reagan didn't know. Donald Regan didn't know. William Casey didn't know. Once upon a time, in the middle of the last century, there was a political party known as the Know Nothings--because they professed to know nothing about unseemly activities attributed to them. Who could have guessed that the Know Nothings would be running this country in 1986? GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
NEWS
November 3, 1995
In "Purgatory" (Oct. 20), the theologians seem to have overlooked the obvious. Isn't it just possible that this is Purgatory? That we're in Purgatory? Right now. Today. Every day. How else can you explain car alarms at 2 a.m., boomboxes, Howard Stern, lawyers, Congress, the National Rifle Assn., tattoos, Jerry Springer, anchorperson chitchat, TV weatherpeople, recorded messages with the menu delivered in 13 languages, those wackos crawling around in the woods with greasepaint on their faces, those wackos walking around with rings in their noses . . . ?
SPORTS
February 24, 1990
The bozos who run boxing have never been known for creative thinking, but maybe somebody can get a message through to them. Will somebody tell them about an invention that came out recently? It's called a clock. You put a 10-second clock on the apron or overhead. When a fighter hits the canvas, an official at ringside hits a button. The clock starts. At 10 seconds, a buzzer sounds; the fight is over. What if the fighter who has been knocked down can't read the clock? Hey, if he can't read the clock, stop the fight and call the paramedics.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
A lot of people thought it was a gimmick when owner Bill Veeck of the Cleveland Indians signed 42-year-old Satchel Paige during the 1948 season, but player-manager Lou Boudreau found out differently, and it didn't take long. "It was 8 o'clock in the morning at Municipal Stadium," Boudreau told Bill Parrillo of the Providence Journal. "I met Satch and told him, 'OK, you can do a little running to get loose.' He just shook his head and said, 'No need to run, Mr. Lou'--he always called me Mr. Lou--'I'm ready now.' "I stepped into the cage," said Boudreau, who batted .355 that season, "and Satch must have thrown maybe 15-20 pitches.
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