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George Lundberg

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HEALTH
May 7, 2001
George Lundberg--like almost all medical doctors--misses the big point ("Former JAMA Editor Laments the State of Medical Care," March 26). HMOs, business, etc., were/are involved in health care to reduce outrageous fees charged by doctors (especially those who own interests in "testing" labs) and pharmaceutical costs. Medical doctor fees will be "normalized" only when we switch most initial analysis to reasonably paid registered nurses, aided by computerized symptom analysis. The tough cases will be referred to the fewer medical doctors that exist, and these tough cases will justify the current exorbitant fees applied to all cases.
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HEALTH
May 7, 2001
George Lundberg--like almost all medical doctors--misses the big point ("Former JAMA Editor Laments the State of Medical Care," March 26). HMOs, business, etc., were/are involved in health care to reduce outrageous fees charged by doctors (especially those who own interests in "testing" labs) and pharmaceutical costs. Medical doctor fees will be "normalized" only when we switch most initial analysis to reasonably paid registered nurses, aided by computerized symptom analysis. The tough cases will be referred to the fewer medical doctors that exist, and these tough cases will justify the current exorbitant fees applied to all cases.
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NEWS
May 17, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the American Medical Assn. issued its historic call for universal health insurance this week, few realized that the roots of the stodgy AMA's surprisingly passionate plea go back almost four decades--to a dilapidated charity hospital in Mobile, Ala. There, a part-time orderly named George D. Lundberg seethed at the unjust treatment of blacks.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The American Medical Assn. fired the editor of its flagship journal Thursday for publishing research in the midst of the impeachment trial showing that 60% of college students surveyed in 1991 did not think that engaging in oral sex was "having sex." The editor, Dr. George D. Lundberg, "inappropriately and inexcusably" interjected the Journal of the American Medical Assn. into a "major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine," said AMA Executive Vice President Dr. E.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The American Medical Assn. fired the editor of its flagship journal Thursday for publishing research in the midst of the impeachment trial showing that 60% of college students surveyed in 1991 did not think that engaging in oral sex was "having sex." The editor, Dr. George D. Lundberg, "inappropriately and inexcusably" interjected the Journal of the American Medical Assn. into a "major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine," said AMA Executive Vice President Dr. E.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Lunching at a desert resort, Dr. George Lundberg doesn't look like someone who would provoke a national debate over whether a doctor's killing of a dying cancer patient is an isolated episode or something that, as he said quietly, could occur "in almost any hospital, in almost any community, in the United States."
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two pathologists who conducted the autopsy of President John F. Kennedy broke almost three decades of silence Tuesday to make public their conclusion that he was struck by two bullets from a single high-velocity rifle fired by a lone assassin. In what amounts to a powerful endorsement of the conclusions of the Warren Commission, Drs. James J. Humes and J. Thornton Boswell, who performed the autopsy at the U.S. Naval Center in Bethesda, Md.
NEWS
October 4, 1989
Spurred by concerns about cases of scientific misconduct, a prestigious medical journal will require study authors to sign a pledge that they will let editors examine their raw data if requested, the journal editor said. The journal also will tighten its requirement on disclosing financial interests involved in the research, said George Lundberg of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The steps are among requirements being imposed to protect the credibility of the journal, Lundberg said.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The editors of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. today said they are moving up publication of the weekly magazine by two days, in part to beat rival publications into print with news items. Under the change, the Journal will be issued Wednesday, one day earlier than the rival New England Journal of Medicine, its prime competitor in the United States.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two pathologists who conducted the autopsy of President John F. Kennedy broke almost three decades of silence Tuesday to make public their conclusion that he was struck by two bullets from a single high-velocity rifle fired by a lone assassin. In what amounts to a powerful endorsement of the conclusions of the Warren Commission, Drs. James J. Humes and J. Thornton Boswell, who performed the autopsy at the U.S. Naval Center in Bethesda, Md.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the American Medical Assn. issued its historic call for universal health insurance this week, few realized that the roots of the stodgy AMA's surprisingly passionate plea go back almost four decades--to a dilapidated charity hospital in Mobile, Ala. There, a part-time orderly named George D. Lundberg seethed at the unjust treatment of blacks.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Lunching at a desert resort, Dr. George Lundberg doesn't look like someone who would provoke a national debate over whether a doctor's killing of a dying cancer patient is an isolated episode or something that, as he said quietly, could occur "in almost any hospital, in almost any community, in the United States."
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