Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGeorge Mckenna
IN THE NEWS

George Mckenna

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1993 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Hollywood version, the George J. McKenna story ended in triumph, with the hero turning a troubled inner-city school into a premier educational institution. The real-life ending might be murkier. McKenna, whose days as crusader principal of Washington Preparatory High School in Los Angeles were celebrated in a 1986 television movie, is trying to save his career as superintendent of the Inglewood schools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2012 | Sandy Banks
George McKenna has been called many things in his long career as an educator: dictator, egomaniac, tyrant, insufferably old-school. He can be blunt, impatient and unyielding. But one thing he's never been called is a quitter. He has always relished a challenge. That's why I was surprised to learn that he is retiring from the Los Angeles Unified School District, where he spent most of the last 50 years trying to stir things up in struggling inner-city schools. His swan song was last week's graduation at beleaguered Fremont High, which had failed for more than a decade to meet federal standards for academic improvement.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1988
George McKenna, the Los Angeles principal whose tough-but-compassionate approach to inner-city education inspired a movie and recognition from President Reagan, has been offered the job of superintendent of the Inglewood Unified School District. Inglewood school board members announced Monday night that they had selected McKenna, 47, from among nine finalists. McKenna, principal of Washington Preparatory High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District, was an early favorite for the post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1993 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Hollywood version, the George J. McKenna story ended in triumph, with the hero turning a troubled inner-city school into a premier educational institution. The real-life ending might be murkier. McKenna, whose days as crusader principal of Washington Preparatory High School in Los Angeles were celebrated in a 1986 television movie, is trying to save his career as superintendent of the Inglewood schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
One day after NBC presented the story of Maude DeVictor in "Unnatural Causes," CBS tonight serves up another TV movie about a contemporary black notable--George McKenna, the principal at George Washington High School in Southwest Los Angeles. McKenna is credited as the catalyst in transforming the school from a violent, drug-plagued campus of low-achieving students to an institution where instruction is the daily order of business and a majorityof graduates continue their education in some form.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
With his casket draped in the American flag--and later with flowers provided by off-duty exotic dancers--reputed Los Angeles vice lord Horace Joseph McKenna was laid to rest Tuesday after a memorial service in which a Catholic priest admonished, "Judgment is not mine, judgment is not yours." More than 250 people attended services for "Big Mac"--a man who attracted little public notice until his mob-style murder Thursday. They were an unusual mix.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1988
High school principal George McKenna comes out strongly on the affirmative side of one of the most critical questions in modern education ("Teachers of Children Must Never Give Up," Op-Ed Page, Jan. 19). Does the public school have the legal and ethical responsibility to keep certain students in regular classes in which their persistently negative behavior obviously makes it extremely difficult for their classmates to learn? McKenna says, yes, "we must never give up on them." Highly disruptive students thus must be retained in their classes so as to receive "liberative and compassionate" therapy from their teachers, he insists, even if in the interim the educational progress of a large majority of their classmates suffers drastically as a result.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | MARC LACEY, Times Staff Writer
Inglewood High School Principal Lawrence Freeman was ordered off campus Tuesday after he was accused of injuring the basketball coach in an argument. It is the second time this year that Supt. George McKenna has told Freeman to leave the school. Freeman, who has won both praise and criticism for his tough leadership style since becoming principal in 1984, angrily disputed Coach Vincent Combs' charges and called the suspension an indignity that may push him towards retirement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993
Board Votes Not to Rehire McKenna as Schools Chief George J. McKenna III, whose life as principal of a Los Angeles high school became the subject of a TV movie, is losing his job as Inglewood schools chief after failing to reverse academic decline and worsening fiscal conditions. The Inglewood Unified School Board announced this week that it would not renew the superintendent's contract when it expires in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1993 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George J. McKenna III, a nationally known educator whose life as principal of a Los Angeles high school was chronicled in a TV movie, is losing his job as Inglewood schools chief amid academic decline and worsening fiscal conditions. The Inglewood Unified School District board announced at its meeting Wednesday that it had decided not to renew the contract of the 53-year-old superintendent, who is known as an advocate for urban schools. The contract expires in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1989 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of those on the selection committee for Inglewood's new school superintendent still remember when George J. McKenna III--fresh from a television movie and White House visit--first entered the interview room last summer. "When he walked in I could see the mouths drop open," said Terry Coleman, one of those present. "He was debonair. He was dressed to kill. People looked at him like he was the Messiah."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989 | JAMES RAINEY, Times Staff Writer
Inglewood police are investigating allegations by Vincent Combs, Inglewood High School boys basketball coach, that he was battered by Principal Lawrence Freeman during an argument in Freeman's office Tuesday. Combs told police Tuesday that his arm and shoulder were repeatedly slammed into a door by Freeman, causing several bruises. Police Sgt. Harold Moret said the marks on Combs' left shoulder and right forearm are consistent with the coach's report to police that Freeman trapped him in an office doorway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | MARC LACEY, Times Staff Writer
Inglewood High School Principal Lawrence Freeman was ordered off campus Tuesday after he was accused of injuring the basketball coach in an argument. It is the second time this year that Supt. George McKenna has told Freeman to leave the school. Freeman, who has won both praise and criticism for his tough leadership style since becoming principal in 1984, angrily disputed Coach Vincent Combs' charges and called the suspension an indignity that may push him towards retirement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1989 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
With his casket draped in the American flag--and later with flowers provided by off-duty exotic dancers--reputed Los Angeles vice lord Horace Joseph McKenna was laid to rest Tuesday after a memorial service in which a Catholic priest admonished, "Judgment is not mine, judgment is not yours." More than 250 people attended services for "Big Mac"--a man who attracted little public notice until his mob-style murder Thursday. They were an unusual mix.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1993 | MICHELE FUETSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George J. McKenna III, a nationally known educator whose life as principal of a Los Angeles high school was chronicled in a TV movie, is losing his job as Inglewood schools chief amid academic decline and worsening fiscal conditions. The Inglewood Unified School District board announced at its meeting Wednesday that it had decided not to renew the contract of the 53-year-old superintendent, who is known as an advocate for urban schools. The contract expires in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989 | JAMES RAINEY, Times Staff Writer
Inglewood police are investigating allegations by Vincent Combs, Inglewood High School boys basketball coach, that he was battered by Principal Lawrence Freeman during an argument in Freeman's office Tuesday. Combs told police Tuesday that his arm and shoulder were repeatedly slammed into a door by Freeman, causing several bruises. Police Sgt. Harold Moret said the marks on Combs' left shoulder and right forearm are consistent with the coach's report to police that Freeman trapped him in an office doorway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1988
George McKenna, the Los Angeles principal whose tough-but-compassionate approach to inner-city education inspired a movie and recognition from President Reagan, has been offered the job of superintendent of the Inglewood Unified School District. Inglewood school board members announced Monday night that they had selected McKenna, 47, from among nine finalists. McKenna, principal of Washington Preparatory High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District, was an early favorite for the post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1988
High school principal George McKenna comes out strongly on the affirmative side of one of the most critical questions in modern education ("Teachers of Children Must Never Give Up," Op-Ed Page, Jan. 19). Does the public school have the legal and ethical responsibility to keep certain students in regular classes in which their persistently negative behavior obviously makes it extremely difficult for their classmates to learn? McKenna says, yes, "we must never give up on them." Highly disruptive students thus must be retained in their classes so as to receive "liberative and compassionate" therapy from their teachers, he insists, even if in the interim the educational progress of a large majority of their classmates suffers drastically as a result.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|