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June 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
George Nakashima, the master woodworker who drew on what he called "the intrinsic spirit of the Japanese people" and his own reverence for trees to craft a rich legacy in furniture, has died at age 85. Nakashima, who was born in Spokane, Wash., died Friday at his home here after what his family said was a brief illness. He was known for working with untrimmed slabs of wood, especially black walnut and redwood.
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NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA), which sold 86% of the nearly 400 lots offered in its Sunday sale, reported the highest total in its 22-year history Monday, realizing $5.12 million in sales, including commissions. The surprise of the show was the sale of the intricate multi-lobed wire hanging sculpture "Untitled S. 437" by Ruth Asawa, shown above, which was expected to fetch between $300,000 and $400,000. The sculpture set a new LAMA record for a single work, going for $1.43 million and tying the world auction record for the sculptor who died last year.
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HOME & GARDEN
October 21, 2004 | Barbara King, Times Staff Writer
Even played against the twilight drama of the Pacific Ocean rushing and roaring as if aimed directly at the glass wall of this redwood living room in Malibu, the small, solitary chair has a commanding presence, serene and reassuring as the rosy horizon turns to gray, and gray turns abruptly to black -- the black void of an infinite coastal sky. The chair looks just right in its far corner facing this untamable force of nature.
HOME & GARDEN
October 28, 2004
RE "Rhapsody in Wood" [Oct. 21]: I can't tell you how much I enjoyed Barbara King's article on George Nakashima. You clearly show that Mr. Nakashima let the spirit of the wood speak through him. Jon Bruce Los Angeles The article about George Nakashima's "woodsmithing" was written in the tradition of true poetry. Barbara King gave genuine homage to the artist and his work and life, which warranted no less than her words describing the ageless and generational beauty of his passion.
HOME & GARDEN
October 28, 2004
RE "Rhapsody in Wood" [Oct. 21]: I can't tell you how much I enjoyed Barbara King's article on George Nakashima. You clearly show that Mr. Nakashima let the spirit of the wood speak through him. Jon Bruce Los Angeles The article about George Nakashima's "woodsmithing" was written in the tradition of true poetry. Barbara King gave genuine homage to the artist and his work and life, which warranted no less than her words describing the ageless and generational beauty of his passion.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
Los Angeles Modern Auctions (LAMA), which sold 86% of the nearly 400 lots offered in its Sunday sale, reported the highest total in its 22-year history Monday, realizing $5.12 million in sales, including commissions. The surprise of the show was the sale of the intricate multi-lobed wire hanging sculpture "Untitled S. 437" by Ruth Asawa, shown above, which was expected to fetch between $300,000 and $400,000. The sculpture set a new LAMA record for a single work, going for $1.43 million and tying the world auction record for the sculptor who died last year.
HOME & GARDEN
May 15, 2008
In 1995, the interior design team of Elizabeth Garouste and Mattia Bonetti furnished a London residence with their visualizations of natural objects in luxurious materials. Sunday, the Wright auction house will offer 15 pieces from the commission, including this three-bulb chandelier, estimated to sell for $20,000 to $30,000. "The drama and magic of these pieces represent the best of the neo-Baroque design from the end of the 20th century," says Richard Wright, owner of the Chicago firm.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | From Times wire services
More than 100 pieces of woodwork and furniture made by craftsman George Nakashima were destroyed in a house fire, authorities said today. "Everything's gone, a total loss," said Fire Chief Mark Freda. "The house and everything in it was destroyed." Nakashima, 83, is considered by many to be the elder statesman of American crafts. Only two pieces of the collection, owned by Dr. Arthur and Evelyn Krosnick, survived, the New York Times reported. A picture frame and a boardroom table were on loan for an exhibit of Nakashima's work at the American Craft Museum in New York.
HOME & GARDEN
April 10, 2008 | David A. Keeps
Working in welded steel with copper, silver and gold, Paul Evans (1931-87) was a prolific artisan whose output from the 1960s has risen substantially in value. In November, Sotheby's sold a small but rare 1960 Evans cabinet for more than $150,000. With 60-plus Evans pieces in its Saturday sale, many from the collection of Evans' metal fabricator, Dorsey Reading, Sollo Rago Modern Auction expects some pieces to sell in the high five figures. There are, however, more affordable buys.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Craig Nakano
What to do when you've got a beloved family coffee table that's just too small for your space? If you're designer Darryl Carter, you build a second table around it. In Carter's new "The Collected Home: Rooms With Style, Grace, and History," co-written with Trish Donnally and released Tuesday by Clarkson Potter, the designer recalls a client whose father had made a small table under the tutelage of the great George Nakashima. When the table was pulled out of storage, Carter says, it was clearly not the right scale for its intended new home.
HOME & GARDEN
October 21, 2004 | Barbara King, Times Staff Writer
Even played against the twilight drama of the Pacific Ocean rushing and roaring as if aimed directly at the glass wall of this redwood living room in Malibu, the small, solitary chair has a commanding presence, serene and reassuring as the rosy horizon turns to gray, and gray turns abruptly to black -- the black void of an infinite coastal sky. The chair looks just right in its far corner facing this untamable force of nature.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
George Nakashima, the master woodworker who drew on what he called "the intrinsic spirit of the Japanese people" and his own reverence for trees to craft a rich legacy in furniture, has died at age 85. Nakashima, who was born in Spokane, Wash., died Friday at his home here after what his family said was a brief illness. He was known for working with untrimmed slabs of wood, especially black walnut and redwood.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | CONNIE KOENENN
A molded plywood chair designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen will be auctioned as part of an "Icons of 20th Century Design" sale Sunday in Beverly Hills. It's a centerpiece for more than 500 items of furniture, glass, pottery and decorative arts to be sold by Los Angeles Modern Auctions at leased space in the Chait Gallery, 9330 Civic Center Drive. The "Conversation" armchair, a major influence on 20th century design, was part of the only Eames-Saarinen collaboration.
HOME & GARDEN
January 19, 2006 | Nancy Yoshihara
Homeowners pulling up stakes in California and heading for new pads in Montana, Wyoming and other parts of the West may want to bone up on Western design. There is rustic and then there is refined rustic. You'll appreciate the difference once you see and study works by Thomas Molesworth, a leading Western furniture designer who died in 1977. His adroit use of woods and master craftsmanship rival, as the author points out, Gustav Stickley, George Nakashima and Charles and Henry Greene.
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