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George Trofimoff

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March 27, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Russian secret service has ordered a former Soviet KGB spymaster now living in Washington to return immediately to Moscow to face charges, reportedly for his role in helping U.S. authorities identify and convict a former Soviet spy in Florida. A Russian Embassy consular official in Washington hand-delivered a subpoena Monday to Oleg Kalugin, who directed KGB foreign intelligence operations at the height of the Cold War.
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NEWS
March 27, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Russian secret service has ordered a former Soviet KGB spymaster now living in Washington to return immediately to Moscow to face charges, reportedly for his role in helping U.S. authorities identify and convict a former Soviet spy in Florida. A Russian Embassy consular official in Washington hand-delivered a subpoena Monday to Oleg Kalugin, who directed KGB foreign intelligence operations at the height of the Cold War.
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NEWS
June 27, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury in Tampa took only two hours Tuesday to find a 74-year-old Florida man guilty of espionage for smuggling thousands of pages of U.S. classified documents to the KGB. George Trofimoff, the German-born son of Russian immigrants and a retired colonel from the U.S. Army Reserve, could face a life term in prison. According to testimony at his trial, he was one of the Kremlin's most prized undercover assets during the Cold War, earning a Soviet medal for valor.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury in Tampa took only two hours Tuesday to find a 74-year-old Florida man guilty of espionage for smuggling thousands of pages of U.S. classified documents to the KGB. George Trofimoff, the German-born son of Russian immigrants and a retired colonel from the U.S. Army Reserve, could face a life term in prison. According to testimony at his trial, he was one of the Kremlin's most prized undercover assets during the Cold War, earning a Soviet medal for valor.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the 14th floor of the federal courthouse here, a strange coda to the Cold War is playing out, its unwilling protagonist a Florida retiree who, until last year, was bagging groceries at a supermarket to help make ends meet. Frail and nearly bald, 74-year-old George Trofimoff would seem much more at home on a sun-dappled shuffleboard court than sitting in the chair of an accused criminal. But according to U.S.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The highest-ranking U.S. military officer ever arrested on spying charges went on trial in Tampa, with a prosecutor saying the defendant was once No. 1 on the Kremlin's list of intelligence sources during the Cold War. In Army Reserve Col. George Trofimoff's espionage trial, federal prosecutor Walter Furr said Trofimoff, 74, delivered documents to the KGB over 25 years. The information he is accused of providing includes details on U.S. battle plans and briefs of chemical and biological
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | Associated Press
A retired Army reserve colonel believed to be the highest-ranking military officer ever arrested for espionage pleaded innocent to the charge Wednesday. George Trofimoff, 73, said nothing during a brief court appearance. His attorney, Daniel Hernandez, spoke for him. Trofimoff is a former civilian chief of the U.S. Army Element of the Joint Interrogation Center in Nuremberg, Germany. U.S. Magistrate Judge Elizabeth A. Jenkins set a tentative trial date for Aug. 7.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Reuters
A former U.S. intelligence agent accused of spying for the Soviet Union during the Cold War was denied bail Tuesday by a federal judge in Florida. George Trofimoff was arrested last week in Tampa on charges of selling secrets to the Soviet KGB while he worked as a civilian at the U.S. Army's Joint Interrogation Center in Nuremberg, Germany, from 1969 to 1994. Trofimoff, 73, retired from his intelligence job in 1995 and moved to Melbourne on Florida's east coast. U.S.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
* George Trofimoff, a retired Army Reserve colonel, was arrested in Florida and charged last year with spying for the former Soviet Union and Russia for 25 years. He is the highest-ranking U.S. military officer ever charged with espionage. A civilian worker in Army intelligence in Germany, he allegedly was recruited into the KGB in 1969. He is accused of photographing U.S. documents and passed the film to KGB agents, and was later recruited into the KGB.
WORLD
June 27, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years after he left his homeland to write about espionage, hobnob with ex-CIA officials and live in the Washington area--where he once was the acting KGB chief--retired Russian Maj. Gen. Oleg Kalugin was convicted of treason here Wednesday and sentenced in absentia to 15 years in prison.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the 14th floor of the federal courthouse here, a strange coda to the Cold War is playing out, its unwilling protagonist a Florida retiree who, until last year, was bagging groceries at a supermarket to help make ends meet. Frail and nearly bald, 74-year-old George Trofimoff would seem much more at home on a sun-dappled shuffleboard court than sitting in the chair of an accused criminal. But according to U.S.
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