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October 6, 1996 | Stanley Meisler, Stanley Meisler is a Times staff writer
Georges de La Tour, a masterful painter of foolish innocents cheated by rogues and of quiet, sanctified moments caught in candlelight, died in the duchy of Lorraine in France in 1652, but the world of art did not discover him until the 20th century. His paintings, some unsigned, some signed only in dark, illegible corners, lay in provincial museums and mansions for almost 300 years, often attributed to some other painter or to no one.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1996 | Stanley Meisler, Stanley Meisler is a Times staff writer
Georges de La Tour, a masterful painter of foolish innocents cheated by rogues and of quiet, sanctified moments caught in candlelight, died in the duchy of Lorraine in France in 1652, but the world of art did not discover him until the 20th century. His paintings, some unsigned, some signed only in dark, illegible corners, lay in provincial museums and mansions for almost 300 years, often attributed to some other painter or to no one.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paris' Louvre is asking for donations to help it buy a painting by French 17th-Century artist Georges de la Tour. De la Tour's portrait of St. Thomas, painted between 1625 and 1630, has been put up for sale for $6 million by the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. "It is our duty and not simply a desire to acquire this painting," Louvre Director Michel Laclotte said at a Monday news conference. "We want to do our best to display the great French painters."
BOOKS
April 17, 1994 | Sue Martin
GEORGES DE LA TOUR by Jacques Thuillier (Flammarion: $90; 318 pp). A Lorraine artist, born in France in 1593, Georges de la Tour remains an enigma even though he is thought to have painted some 400-500 canvases. Only a scant 30 or so canvases are signed and another 50 or so canvases are attributed to him, some may be copies of original works by other artists and many are lost.
BOOKS
April 17, 1994 | Sue Martin
GEORGES DE LA TOUR by Jacques Thuillier (Flammarion: $90; 318 pp). A Lorraine artist, born in France in 1593, Georges de la Tour remains an enigma even though he is thought to have painted some 400-500 canvases. Only a scant 30 or so canvases are signed and another 50 or so canvases are attributed to him, some may be copies of original works by other artists and many are lost.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2005 | From Associated Press
Paintings by two famed artists were reported discovered Friday in different European cities. In Germany, an unknown work by Edvard Munch was found after restorers discovered it behind another canvas at the Kunsthalle, the main art museum in Bremen. It shows three mask-like faces looking down toward a naked, seated girl. Restorers discovered it hidden on a second canvas behind the museum's only Munch work, "The Dead Mother," director Wulf Herzogenrath said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Charles Bierer Wrightsman, a retired oil executive turned philanthropist whose homes contained some of the important private art collections in the world, has died at the age of 90. Wrightsman, a benefactor and trustee of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art for three decades, died Tuesday at his Manhattan home. He also maintained homes in London and Palm Beach, Fla., where he often was host to President John F. Kennedy.
MAGAZINE
January 16, 2000 | Mary Melton
What with wax and wicks being a $5-billion-a-year industry, it was perhaps inevitable that the Los Angeles County Museum of Art would offer its very own candle. Included in its nifty "Membership in a Box" package, which sells for $75 in the gift shop, is a one-year membership, coupons and an exclusive Illume 8-ounce "LACMA Aroma" candle that burns for 30 to 35 hours. After ruling out a special deck of cards, the museum's membership development team settled on a candle to spruce up the package.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Not quite a household word in photography but a master of his trade, the late W. Eugene Smith offered a brutal insight into man's highest and lowest moments. His technique could be as flashy and obvious as a calling card ("Empire State Building at Midnight") or tempered to a grainy, blink-of-a-second in time ("Three Men Hugging, Andrea Doria"). Remarkably, these photos--mostly from the '50s--ferret out weighty content in the most everyday places.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | THE SOCIAL CLIMES STAFF
We were pleased to hear that the new Fusion restaurant at the Pacific Design Center came up with a concept other than the now routine cigar-smoking area. Attached to the main bar is a small martini bar offering seven variations on the classic cocktail. They include a Mexican martini (add a bit of tequila and lime juice), an Asian Martini (sake) and a Fusion martini (cranberry and grapefruit juice and a few other things).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paris' Louvre is asking for donations to help it buy a painting by French 17th-Century artist Georges de la Tour. De la Tour's portrait of St. Thomas, painted between 1625 and 1630, has been put up for sale for $6 million by the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. "It is our duty and not simply a desire to acquire this painting," Louvre Director Michel Laclotte said at a Monday news conference. "We want to do our best to display the great French painters."
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | BETTY GOODWIN
THE MOVIE: "Tous les Matins du Monde"("All the Mornings of the World"). THE SETUP: A young viola player, Marin Marais (Guillaume Depardieu and later his dad, Gerard, pictured), becomes the pupil of a reclusive musical genius, Monsier de Saint Colombe (Jean-Pierre Marielle). A tempestuous, though hypothetical, relationship ensues as Marais becomes the darling of the court of Louis XIV and St. Colombe composes in obscurity in 17th-Century France.
OPINION
October 1, 1995
Claude Monet's "Wheatstacks (Snow Effect, Morning)" went on public view last week at the Getty Museum in Malibu, enriching the region's cultural life. The piece is one of a series done by the French Impressionist master in the late 1800s, all of the same subject, haystacks in a field, which Monet painted at different seasons and times of the day. To see this 1891 oil--exhibited only twice before--is to understand the enduring appeal of the Impressionists and our good fortune in having the Getty.
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