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Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili

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OPINION
August 12, 2008
Re "U.S. asks: How far will Russia go?," Aug. 11 Here we go again. The Russians are coming, blasting their way south through South Ossetia. According to Russian U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin, Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili "must go" because he has become "an obstacle." "Regime change," Churkin says, is an "American expression." Why then doesn't the Russian government urge the residents of South Ossetia to undertake a nonviolent, mass effort to remove Saakashvili from office and elect a responsible leader?
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 5, 2008 | Alexandra Jinjikhashvili, Special to The Times
Appearing alongside beleaguered Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday criticized Russia's conduct in its short war with Georgia and pledged to continue American support for reconstruction and humanitarian aid. Cheney's visit to Tbilisi was the highlight of a quick swing through the Western-friendly nations of Azerbaijan, Georgia and Ukraine, all former Soviet republics. The trip apparently was designed to shore up the morale of national leaders rattled by Russia's rout of U.S.-trained Georgian forces.
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WORLD
August 19, 2008 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on Monday condemned Russia for what she said was a growing reliance on military power as she headed for Europe to increase allied pressure for Moscow to withdraw its forces from Georgia. Rice, in her toughest criticism of the Kremlin to date, said Russia's incursion into Georgia was part of a pattern in which the government has increasingly turned to its military to assert its influence. She cited Russia's increasing practice of sending long-range bombers on patrol near U.S. and allied coastlines, and its dispute with the British over the alleged poisoning of a former KGB agent in London.
WORLD
August 25, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
In this historic hub of expansion and empire, Russia's military victory over U.S.-backed Georgia was cheered as evidence that Moscow has regained its global dominance -- and proof that the rest of the world can't risk standing in its way. As Russian soldiers poured into neighboring Georgia this month and Russian warplanes bombed fleeing, ill-equipped Georgian troops, U.S. and European officials condemned Moscow. But the image of Russia that appeared over and over in media here was that of a country rising from its knees.
WORLD
September 5, 2008 | Alexandra Jinjikhashvili, Special to The Times
Appearing alongside beleaguered Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday criticized Russia's conduct in its short war with Georgia and pledged to continue American support for reconstruction and humanitarian aid. Cheney's visit to Tbilisi was the highlight of a quick swing through the Western-friendly nations of Azerbaijan, Georgia and Ukraine, all former Soviet republics. The trip apparently was designed to shore up the morale of national leaders rattled by Russia's rout of U.S.-trained Georgian forces.
WORLD
August 20, 2008 | Matea Gold, Tracy Wilkinson and Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writers
He is the leader of a small country that was, until recently, not on the radar of most Americans. But it's been hard to turn on a news channel this month without encountering the angry, brooding glare of Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, railing against the Russian troops pouring across his country's borders, doing his best to turn a military disaster into a media victory. There he is on CNN -- again. On the CBS morning program "The Early Show" and on the evening news talking to Katie Couric.
NEWS
August 17, 2008 | Tim Judah, Tim Judah covers the Balkans for the Economist. He is the author of "The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia" and the forthcoming "Kosovo: What Everyone Needs to Know."
Afew months ago, I traveled to Sukhumi, a balmy, war-wrecked seaside resort that is the capital of Abkhazia. Abkhazia and South Ossetia, as anyone who has followed the news of the last week cannot fail to know, are the two breakaway regions of Georgia. In pelting rain, I crossed the Inguri River from Georgia proper into Abkhazia and noticed that the Georgians had erected a giant sculpture on their side. It was of a pistol pointing at Abkhazia, but the barrel of the gun had been tied in a knot.
WORLD
August 30, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
The upper part of Georgia's Kodori Gorge is a 25-mile stretch of narrow river valley, with steep slopes rising to snowcapped peaks. It boasts a few scattered villages and a population of about 4,000. In winter, snow cuts off the road to the Georgian capital. So it might seem a strange place for the headquarters of a regional government.
WORLD
August 25, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
In this historic hub of expansion and empire, Russia's military victory over U.S.-backed Georgia was cheered as evidence that Moscow has regained its global dominance -- and proof that the rest of the world can't risk standing in its way. As Russian soldiers poured into neighboring Georgia this month and Russian warplanes bombed fleeing, ill-equipped Georgian troops, U.S. and European officials condemned Moscow. But the image of Russia that appeared over and over in media here was that of a country rising from its knees.
WORLD
March 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Georgia's blockade of its rebel Adzharia region took hold as rail cargo stopped reaching the Black Sea port of Batumi and a nighttime curfew was declared. Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili seeks to bring pro-Moscow Adzharia under central control before the March 28 parliamentary elections.
WORLD
August 20, 2008 | Matea Gold, Tracy Wilkinson and Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writers
He is the leader of a small country that was, until recently, not on the radar of most Americans. But it's been hard to turn on a news channel this month without encountering the angry, brooding glare of Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, railing against the Russian troops pouring across his country's borders, doing his best to turn a military disaster into a media victory. There he is on CNN -- again. On the CBS morning program "The Early Show" and on the evening news talking to Katie Couric.
WORLD
August 19, 2008 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on Monday condemned Russia for what she said was a growing reliance on military power as she headed for Europe to increase allied pressure for Moscow to withdraw its forces from Georgia. Rice, in her toughest criticism of the Kremlin to date, said Russia's incursion into Georgia was part of a pattern in which the government has increasingly turned to its military to assert its influence. She cited Russia's increasing practice of sending long-range bombers on patrol near U.S. and allied coastlines, and its dispute with the British over the alleged poisoning of a former KGB agent in London.
NEWS
August 17, 2008 | Tim Judah, Tim Judah covers the Balkans for the Economist. He is the author of "The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia" and the forthcoming "Kosovo: What Everyone Needs to Know."
Afew months ago, I traveled to Sukhumi, a balmy, war-wrecked seaside resort that is the capital of Abkhazia. Abkhazia and South Ossetia, as anyone who has followed the news of the last week cannot fail to know, are the two breakaway regions of Georgia. In pelting rain, I crossed the Inguri River from Georgia proper into Abkhazia and noticed that the Georgians had erected a giant sculpture on their side. It was of a pistol pointing at Abkhazia, but the barrel of the gun had been tied in a knot.
OPINION
August 12, 2008
Re "U.S. asks: How far will Russia go?," Aug. 11 Here we go again. The Russians are coming, blasting their way south through South Ossetia. According to Russian U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin, Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili "must go" because he has become "an obstacle." "Regime change," Churkin says, is an "American expression." Why then doesn't the Russian government urge the residents of South Ossetia to undertake a nonviolent, mass effort to remove Saakashvili from office and elect a responsible leader?
WORLD
August 30, 2006 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
The upper part of Georgia's Kodori Gorge is a 25-mile stretch of narrow river valley, with steep slopes rising to snowcapped peaks. It boasts a few scattered villages and a population of about 4,000. In winter, snow cuts off the road to the Georgian capital. So it might seem a strange place for the headquarters of a regional government.
WORLD
April 8, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili said the attempted assassination of a Russian general in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital, was intended to derail improving relations with Moscow. Russia, which has two Soviet-era military bases in Georgia, called for an investigation after the commander of its southern Caucasus forces was slightly wounded by a bomb Tuesday.
WORLD
January 12, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A court convicted a man of trying to assassinate President Bush and Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili by throwing a grenade at them during a rally May 10, and it sentenced him to life in prison. Vladimir Arutyunian also was convicted of killing a policeman before his arrest. The grenade landed about 100 feet from the leaders and did not explode.
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