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Gerald Bull

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NEWS
April 7, 1990
Gerald Bull, 62, a Canadian-born arms dealer and weapons designer, once described as Canada's boy genius of rocket science by Maclean's magazine. He was the youngest person, at 22, to earn a doctorate from the University of Toronto. Bull was convicted in Vermont in 1980 on charges of smuggling arms to South Africa. He also had extensive business dealings with China, the Canadian news agency Southam News reported.
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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's most-prized weapon lay concealed on a mountaintop in northern Iraq, where it was not discovered until well after the Persian Gulf War. The 165-foot-long cannon, capable of firing projectiles armed with nuclear devices and lethal chemicals at targets more than 100 miles away, had been tested and was nearly operational. The cannon was one of several "super-guns" that Hussein planned to acquire as part of his ill-fated drive toward military dominance in the Persian Gulf.
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NEWS
March 11, 1992 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gerald Bull was a genuine visionary with a bizarre obsession, a gifted inventor who devoted his life and work to proving that artillery pieces are preferable to ballistic missiles or "smart" bombs. But he also was a murder victim, killed by one of the machines he labored so long to support.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration approved export licenses for computers and software that helped design Iraq's notorious supergun and a ballistic missile capable of reaching Israel and other Middle East countries, according to documents and congressional investigators. The export license for the computers was granted in the fall of 1989 to a Maryland company controlled by artillery wizard Gerald Bull, who was assassinated six months later outside his apartment in Belgium.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration approved export licenses for computers and software that helped design Iraq's notorious supergun and a ballistic missile capable of reaching Israel and other Middle East countries, according to documents and congressional investigators. The export license for the computers was granted in the fall of 1989 to a Maryland company controlled by artillery wizard Gerald Bull, who was assassinated six months later outside his apartment in Belgium.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's most-prized weapon lay concealed on a mountaintop in northern Iraq, where it was not discovered until well after the Persian Gulf War. The 165-foot-long cannon, capable of firing projectiles armed with nuclear devices and lethal chemicals at targets more than 100 miles away, had been tested and was nearly operational. The cannon was one of several "super-guns" that Hussein planned to acquire as part of his ill-fated drive toward military dominance in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | Jon Matsumoto
Full of real-life mystery and shady government dealings, this 1994 HBO production revolves around Canadian arms designer and dealer Gerald Bull, who was assassinated in 1990 while building a "super gun" for Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. Had it been completed, the gun, with its nearly 200-yard-long barrel, would have been the largest weapon of its kind. Frank Langella (pictured) is transfixing as the naive, single-minded Bull.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Set against the murky backdrop of arms research, espionage and military strategy, an inquiry into the murder of a weapons engineer poses chilling moral dilemmas in the West Coast premiere of promising Canadian playwright Jason Sherman's "Three in the Back, Two in the Head."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Full of real-life mystery, intrigue and shady government dealings, HBO's "Doomsday Gun" is the type of intricately woven thriller that demands the viewer's undivided attention. This politically trenchant film revolves around Canadian arms designer and dealer Gerald Bull, who was assassinated in 1990 while building a "super gun" for Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee asked President Clinton on Friday to provide the panel with documents withheld by the George Bush Administration concerning illegal U.S. loans to Iraq. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.) had spearheaded congressional attacks on the Bush Administration's support of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein before the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gerald Bull was a genuine visionary with a bizarre obsession, a gifted inventor who devoted his life and work to proving that artillery pieces are preferable to ballistic missiles or "smart" bombs. But he also was a murder victim, killed by one of the machines he labored so long to support.
NEWS
April 7, 1990
Gerald Bull, 62, a Canadian-born arms dealer and weapons designer, once described as Canada's boy genius of rocket science by Maclean's magazine. He was the youngest person, at 22, to earn a doctorate from the University of Toronto. Bull was convicted in Vermont in 1980 on charges of smuggling arms to South Africa. He also had extensive business dealings with China, the Canadian news agency Southam News reported.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A British intelligence official, testifying from behind a screen, told a London court Friday that details of Iraq's secret arms-buying effort were shared with other Western intelligence agencies as early as 1987. The official, identified only as "Officer B" of the MI5 security service, did not specifically say the CIA received the intelligence reports. However, a U.S.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | From Reuters
A South African-made gun, produced to match modern Western weapons denied to Pretoria by an anti-apartheid arms embargo, will pack a powerful punch for Iraq in Persian Gulf war land battles. The G-5 155-millimeter howitzer, regarded as one of the best weapons in Iraq's arsenal, can deliver a nuclear, chemical or conventional warhead up to 25 miles with great accuracy. The International Institute for Strategic Studies says the Iraqi army has 100 South African-built G-5s.
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