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Geraldine Knatz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2005 | Deborah Schoch, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa passed over the city's top port executives Wednesday to nominate an outsider to head the nation's largest seaport, calling it "a new day for the Port of Los Angeles." Villaraigosa named Geraldine Knatz, managing director of development at the Port of Long Beach -- the Los Angeles port's biggest rival -- to oversee the sprawling San Pedro seaport with 58 berths and a budget of $693.5 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By David Zahniser
The Los Angeles City Council signed off Tuesday on major changes to a harbor construction project whose cost doubled in four years, with lawmakers criticizing port executives for failing to consult the council sooner. Councilman Joe Buscaino, whose district includes the port, said he was "blindsided" by the rising cost of the upgrade to the TraPac terminal in Wilmington, which soared to $510 million from $245 million in 2009. Councilman Mike Bonin said he and his colleagues should have been included in the port's decision to convert the terminal to an automated crane system, a move that triggered a major portion of the cost overruns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Geraldine Knatz was unanimously approved as the executive director of the Port of Los Angeles by the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday. Knatz was previously the managing director of development at the Port of Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser
The price tag for a major container terminal upgrade at the Port of Los Angeles has more than doubled over the last four years, caused in large part by major design changes OKd without the approval of city elected officials. The construction budget for the 173-acre terminal development has soared to $510 million, up from the $245-million estimated cost when City Council members authorized the project in 2009, according to a new report by city budget analysts. On Tuesday, the council is scheduled to discuss the increased outlays for the project, which is located north of the Vincent Thomas Bridge.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2009
Regarding "Port's clean-rig program is running on empty," Jan. 27: The Times is correct that the Port of Los Angeles' 2007 Compliant Incentive Program has had unprecedented success in bringing an early infusion of clean trucks into port service. However, the article suggests that the port can't fulfill its commitment to the trucking companies that have purchased and put into port service hundreds of 2007 EPA-compliant trucks. We do have enough funds to pay each of the approved program applicants the $20,000-per-truck incentive for every qualifying truck they put into port service.
OPINION
December 24, 2005
Re "Toward cleaner ports," editorial, Dec. 18 You mischaracterized the maritime industry's reaction to the appointment of Geraldine Knatz as new head of the Port of Los Angeles, as well as its continuing support for balanced and effective environmental programs. Our organization praised the appointment of Knatz, who is committed to improving air quality while ensuring Southern California remains a center of international trade. Ocean carriers are using and testing various technologies to lower emissions; marine terminals are making enormous investments in environment-friendly cargo-handling equipment; and terminals are working collaboratively to keep the ports open at nights and on weekends.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
The nation's busiest container seaport shrugged off an eight-day strike and a very slow December to post its third-best year for cargo volume, port officials said. The Port of Los Angeles handled just 588,154 containers in December, down 9.4% from December 2011. But over the course of 2012, the port handled just under 8.1 million containers. Those containers carried imports, mostly from Asia, as well as U.S. exports headed overseas and empties that were also headed back across the Pacific.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
The Port of Los Angeles set a new standard for exports in 2011, becoming the first harbor in the nation to ship more than 2 million containers carrying U.S. goods to customers overseas, according to year-end statistics released by port officials Tuesday. The nation's busiest seaport moved 176,531 export containers in December, enough to kick its 2011 total up to 2.11 million. That broke the port's old record of 1.84 million export containers, set in 2010. No other U.S. harbor has ever moved more export containers.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2010 | By Ronald D. White
The nation's two busiest cargo container ports -- Los Angeles and Long Beach -- ended a terrible year in international trade with strong December numbers that might signal the beginning of a long-awaited economic rebound. The Port of Los Angeles, which ranks first in the U.S., handled 562,990 cargo containers last month, a tiny increase of 0.35% over the 561,033 recorded in the same month a year earlier. The increase was driven by a huge 40.2% increase in exports, which climbed to 153,836 containers from 109,704 a year earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Catherine Saillant and Dan Weikel
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday that the top executive at the Port of Los Angeles will leave at the end of the year, the first department head to announce a departure during Garcetti's review of high-level managers. Geraldine Knatz, who has been running the nation's busiest port since 2006, will retire at the end of the year. Garcetti also announced that Gary Lee Moore, currently the city engineer, will serve as acting general manager at the harbor until a permanent replacement is found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By David Zahniser and Dan Weikel
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday that the top executive at the Port of Los Angeles will retire at the end of the year, the first department head to announce a departure during Garcetti's review of high-level managers. Geraldine Knatz, who has been running the nation's busiest port since 2006, will leave her post in November but stay on until the end of December. Garcetti thanked Knatz for her service and said Gary Lee Moore, now the city engineer, will be acting general manager at the harbor department until a permanent replacement is found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Catherine Saillant and Dan Weikel
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday that the top executive at the Port of Los Angeles will leave at the end of the year, the first department head to announce a departure during Garcetti's review of high-level managers. Geraldine Knatz, who has been running the nation's busiest port since 2006, will retire at the end of the year. Garcetti also announced that Gary Lee Moore, currently the city engineer, will serve as acting general manager at the harbor until a permanent replacement is found.
OPINION
April 29, 2013 | Jim Newton
It's fun for mayoral candidates to imagine eliminating potholes or building new trains to link the Valley to the Westside. It's not hard to support a spiffed-up LAX (really, what's hard to believe is that it's taken this long) or legions of new police officers making Los Angeles safe. What you don't often hear from these candidates, however, is a thoughtful vision for the Port of Los Angeles. The port can seem far away, but it's crucial to the city's life. Every year, more than $250 billion worth of cargo passes through its 7,500 acres of docks and cranes.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
The nation's busiest container seaport shrugged off an eight-day strike and a very slow December to post its third-best year for cargo volume, port officials said. The Port of Los Angeles handled just 588,154 containers in December, down 9.4% from December 2011. But over the course of 2012, the port handled just under 8.1 million containers. Those containers carried imports, mostly from Asia, as well as U.S. exports headed overseas and empties that were also headed back across the Pacific.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer and Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
For eight long days, the usual lunch crowd was missing from Marcos Medina's restaurant. The eatery, called Isaac's Cafe, is located just a few blocks from the Port of Los Angeles. The longshoremen and others who make their living working at the massive seaport weren't coming through the glass doors of the family-run business. "I have to be honest - our business runs off of them," said Medina, 42. But on Wednesday, the port sprang to life. Medina was back hustling and taking food orders from a long line of customers at the tiny Mexican food joint his parents opened in 1977.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By Ronald D. White
The Port of Los Angeles set a new standard for exports in 2011, becoming the first harbor in the nation to ship more than 2 million containers carrying U.S. goods to customers overseas, according to year-end statistics released by port officials Tuesday. The nation's busiest seaport moved 176,531 export containers in December, enough to kick its 2011 total up to 2.11 million. That broke the port's old record of 1.84 million export containers, set in 2010. No other U.S. harbor has ever moved more export containers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser
The price tag for a major container terminal upgrade at the Port of Los Angeles has more than doubled over the last four years, caused in large part by major design changes OKd without the approval of city elected officials. The construction budget for the 173-acre terminal development has soared to $510 million, up from the $245-million estimated cost when City Council members authorized the project in 2009, according to a new report by city budget analysts. On Tuesday, the council is scheduled to discuss the increased outlays for the project, which is located north of the Vincent Thomas Bridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2008 | Ronald D. White and Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writers
The Federal Maritime Commission on Friday raised several questions about the Los Angeles-Long Beach port complex's landmark clean-trucks program that appear likely to delay the plan's Oct. 1 start. The two ports, which make up the nation's busiest container cargo operation, received a voluminous set of questions about their plans to ban pre-1989 trucks in favor of newer, cleaner models. The agency could go to federal court to block implementation if it doesn't like the answers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday threw out a key provision of a program aimed at reducing diesel emissions from trucks hauling containers from the Port of Los Angeles. The three-judge panel based in San Francisco eliminated a so-called employee provision from the port's effort to replace older, heavily polluting drayage trucks with lower-emission models. The rule would have effectively ended trucking companies' use of independent contractors to haul containers and forced the companies to shoulder responsibility for replacing, properly operating and maintaining trucks.
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