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Gerhard Richter

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May 15, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Barnett Newman set an artist record at auction on Tuesday, selling for $43.8 million in New York. Sotheby's had expected "Onement VI," an abstract work in dark blue, to go for between $30 million and $40 million. The sale was part of a larger auction of contemporary art that brought in a total of $293.6 million, on the low end of expectations. The sale included an auction record for Gerhard Richter. The artist's photo-painting "Domplatz, Mailand" brought in $37.1 million. A Yves Klein piece, "Untitled Blue Sponge Sculpture," sold for $22 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
The rich coal deposits at Bergwerk Prosper-Haniel mines in Germany's Ruhr Valley are what lurk beneath the industrial towers shown in many of Bernd and Hilla Becher's classic Minimalist photographs from the late 1960s and '70s. For his most recent series of photographs, Miles Coolidge went down into those mine shafts. Four large, luxurious inkjet prints of the coal seams are at Acme Gallery. At first the images are difficult to make out, the sooty blackness yielding a velvety surface flecked with spots of white.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By David Ng
A painting by German artist Gerhard Richter has broken the record for the most paid at auction for a work by a living artist, according to Sotheby's. The work, titled "Abstaktes Bild" (804-9), sold for 21.3 million pounds ($34.2 million) on Friday in London. Sotheby's said the 1994 painting belonged to guitarist Eric Clapton and was sold to an anonymous buyer. The auction house had estimated the painting between 9 million to 12 million pounds.   The all-time top record-holder for a painting at auction was set last year with Cezanne's "The Card Players," which sold for more than $250 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Claude Monet fetched $30.8 million at a Sotheby's auction in London on Wednesday after a bidding battle jacked up the selling price of the work. The auction of Impressionist and Modern art brought in a total of $165.9 million. Monet's "Le Palais Contarini" depicts a Venetian palazzo and was created in 1908. The painting was the subject of a four-way bidding skirmish that caused the selling price to rise slightly above Sotheby's high-end estimate of $30.2 million. The painting belonged to the Nahmad family of art dealers, who had purchased the work for $4.2 million in 1996 at a Christie's auction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
Things are not what they seem. Take Gerhard Richter. When you travel to West Germany his paintings are as much a staple of museums' contemporary galleries as, say, Andy Warhol or Frank Stella. The difference is that whether you are in Dusseldorf or Cologne, Stuttgart or Hanover you always recognize the Warhols, Stellas and other products of the brotherhood of the international art franchise. Art museums' contemporary galleries are as homogenized as Burger Kings. Gerhard Richter is different.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerhard Richter's modest 1962 painting "Table" is one of the earliest works in the German artist's enormous retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, and it's also one of the strangest. The canvas might look odd, but actually it's composed with an astringent logic. "Table" sets up certain parameters that Richter, 70, has spent the past 40 years exploring in diverse ways. We don't ordinarily think of paint and brush strokes as objects, or things that are capable of being seen and touched.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A popular art installation in Hong Kong's Victoria Harbor is no longer making waves. A 54-foot rubber duck, designed by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, started deflating Tuesday, and by Wednesday, the piece looked like a flattened yellow pancake bobbing on the water. “Rubber Duck” was installed May 2 and has since spawned serenades from city officials, choreographed dances by local groups and brisk sales of du ck-related goods. Officials were slow to report that the piece was deflated as part of a planned tuneup, leaving onlookers to wonder if the bird had been a victim of “fowl” play.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1990
Regarding "Powerful Works on the Richter Scale" by Christopher Knight, Jan. 14: If indeed Knight believes that artist Gerhard Richter ". . . does not politically eulogize terrorism in this suite," one can only wonder if the ghost of "the shyly smiling, self-reflective terrorist Gudrun Ensslin" would bypass torching a building housing Richter's paintings of the Red Army Faction. N. TORII Bakersfield
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Wassily Kandinsky has sold for $21.2 million at a Christie's auction of Impressionist and Modern works of art in London. The auction on Tuesday brought in a hefty total of $100.4 million, but the sale lacked any major surprises.  Kandinsky's "Study for Improvisation 3," created in 1909, was the top seller of the evening. The price was in the middle of the auction house's expectation range. The brightly colored landscape painting sold for $16.8 million in 2008. Tuesday's auction also featured Picasso's 1960 painting "Woman Seated in an Armchair," which sold for $9.6 million, slightly surpassing expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Claude Monet fetched $30.8 million at a Sotheby's auction in London on Wednesday after a bidding battle jacked up the selling price of the work. The auction of Impressionist and Modern art brought in a total of $165.9 million. Monet's "Le Palais Contarini" depicts a Venetian palazzo and was created in 1908. The painting was the subject of a four-way bidding skirmish that caused the selling price to rise slightly above Sotheby's high-end estimate of $30.2 million. The painting belonged to the Nahmad family of art dealers, who had purchased the work for $4.2 million in 1996 at a Christie's auction.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Wassily Kandinsky has sold for $21.2 million at a Christie's auction of Impressionist and Modern works of art in London. The auction on Tuesday brought in a hefty total of $100.4 million, but the sale lacked any major surprises.  Kandinsky's "Study for Improvisation 3," created in 1909, was the top seller of the evening. The price was in the middle of the auction house's expectation range. The brightly colored landscape painting sold for $16.8 million in 2008. Tuesday's auction also featured Picasso's 1960 painting "Woman Seated in an Armchair," which sold for $9.6 million, slightly surpassing expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By David Ng
[ Updated ] Jimmy Kimmel took to Twitter late Friday to deny that he was the buyer of John Currin's nude Bea Arthur painting, contradicting an earlier tweet confirming that he was. He also denied that he had given the painting to fellow comedian Jeffrey Ross. Kimmel wrote on his official Twitter account: "Contrary to 'news' reports, I didn't buy the Bea Arthur painting - not even for @realjeffreyross - but I did buy the Mona Lisa Lampanelli. " Earlier on Friday, the comedian confirmed on Twitter that he was the person who spent $1.9 million on a 1991 nude portrait of Arthur by artist John Currin, and that he has given the painting to fellow comedian Jeff Ross.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By David Ng
Did it come with a card attached that says, "Thank you for being a friend"? A 1991 painting depicting a topless Bea Arthur that was created by artist John Currin has sold at an auction Wednesday for $1.9 million. The sale was part of a larger Christie's auction in New York of post-war and contemporary art that brought in a total of $495 million -- a record figure for any art auction. The Christie's sale featured 72 items by many of the most coveted names in 20th century art. Works by Jackson Pollock, Roy Lichtenstein and Jean-Michel Basquiat brought in record auction amounts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By David Ng
A painting by Barnett Newman set an artist record at auction on Tuesday, selling for $43.8 million in New York. Sotheby's had expected "Onement VI," an abstract work in dark blue, to go for between $30 million and $40 million. The sale was part of a larger auction of contemporary art that brought in a total of $293.6 million, on the low end of expectations. The sale included an auction record for Gerhard Richter. The artist's photo-painting "Domplatz, Mailand" brought in $37.1 million. A Yves Klein piece, "Untitled Blue Sponge Sculpture," sold for $22 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A popular art installation in Hong Kong's Victoria Harbor is no longer making waves. A 54-foot rubber duck, designed by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, started deflating Tuesday, and by Wednesday, the piece looked like a flattened yellow pancake bobbing on the water. “Rubber Duck” was installed May 2 and has since spawned serenades from city officials, choreographed dances by local groups and brisk sales of du ck-related goods. Officials were slow to report that the piece was deflated as part of a planned tuneup, leaving onlookers to wonder if the bird had been a victim of “fowl” play.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Seven new paintings by Martin Durazo at Luis de Jesus Gallery elaborate on his slightly earlier graffiti-inspired work, while the pleasure-palace installation in the back room removes pretty much any doubt about the paintings' intentions. The large, abstract canvases are covered with big, brushy strokes and gritty squeegee-scrapings of paint, but they aren't engaged in a drama of existential doubt that might follow a trajectory from Willem De Kooning in the 1950s to Gerhard Richter now. Instead, Durazo's robust abstractions function as a kind of mise-en-scène for social interaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By David Ng
[ Updated ] Jimmy Kimmel took to Twitter late Friday to deny that he was the buyer of John Currin's nude Bea Arthur painting, contradicting an earlier tweet confirming that he was. He also denied that he had given the painting to fellow comedian Jeffrey Ross. Kimmel wrote on his official Twitter account: "Contrary to 'news' reports, I didn't buy the Bea Arthur painting - not even for @realjeffreyross - but I did buy the Mona Lisa Lampanelli. " Earlier on Friday, the comedian confirmed on Twitter that he was the person who spent $1.9 million on a 1991 nude portrait of Arthur by artist John Currin, and that he has given the painting to fellow comedian Jeff Ross.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Seven new paintings by Martin Durazo at Luis de Jesus Gallery elaborate on his slightly earlier graffiti-inspired work, while the pleasure-palace installation in the back room removes pretty much any doubt about the paintings' intentions. The large, abstract canvases are covered with big, brushy strokes and gritty squeegee-scrapings of paint, but they aren't engaged in a drama of existential doubt that might follow a trajectory from Willem De Kooning in the 1950s to Gerhard Richter now. Instead, Durazo's robust abstractions function as a kind of mise-en-scène for social interaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By David Ng
A painting by German artist Gerhard Richter has broken the record for the most paid at auction for a work by a living artist, according to Sotheby's. The work, titled "Abstaktes Bild" (804-9), sold for 21.3 million pounds ($34.2 million) on Friday in London. Sotheby's said the 1994 painting belonged to guitarist Eric Clapton and was sold to an anonymous buyer. The auction house had estimated the painting between 9 million to 12 million pounds.   The all-time top record-holder for a painting at auction was set last year with Cezanne's "The Card Players," which sold for more than $250 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Damsels in Distress Sony, $30.99; Blu-ray, $35.99 Available on VOD beginning Sept. 25 Writer-director Whit Stillman's first film since 1998's "The Last Days of Disco" is a loopy campus comedy, starring Greta Gerwig as an idealistic upperclassman who leads a group of young women with strict rules about dating and cleanliness. Even those who've enjoyed the arch language and intricate social tribalism of Stillman's "Metropolitan" and "Barcelona" might be put off by the cartoony absurdism here.
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