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Gerhard Schroeder

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NEWS
March 2, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germany's "eternal chancellor," Helmut Kohl, suddenly acquired a powerful opponent Sunday, as the popular Gerhard Schroeder led his Social Democratic Party to its strongest showing since World War II in state elections in Lower Saxony. During his campaign to be reelected head of the state government, the 53-year-old Schroeder has been saying for months that if he did well in Sunday's election, he should be nominated to run against Kohl when Germany holds federal elections this fall.
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WORLD
November 13, 2005 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
A leader of sporadic ambition and unfulfilled promise, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder appears to be on his way to a political afterlife of memoir writing and high-priced speeches. Schroeder is set to leave office this month after seven years of leadership that failed to reinvent the welfare state but restored Germans' confidence in their country's handling of world affairs, most notably through his vigorous opposition to the Iraq war.
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NEWS
September 17, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the election strategy of Gerhard Schroeder could be synthesized into one slogan, that rallying cry would be: "I'm not Helmut Kohl." The jovial, even roguish, cigar-puffing governor of Lower Saxony, who aspires to unseat Europe's longest-serving elected leader, has fashioned his campaign almost exclusively around voter fatigue with the portly, charisma-challenged incumbent.
WORLD
October 13, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, who has led Germany since 1998, told an audience of union members in his home city of Hanover that he would not play a role in the next government. Schroeder was speaking two days after his Social Democrats said he was ready to allow conservative Angela Merkel to lead a power-sharing government of their two parties.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his first visit to the United States since being elected Germany's next chancellor, Gerhard Schroeder on Friday appeared to indicate support for NATO airstrikes to ease the humanitarian crisis in Kosovo.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doling out high-profile posts in a coalition government is always fraught with hard bargaining and hurt feelings. But Chancellor-elect Gerhard Schroeder of Germany probably never expected to hear the loudest squabbling from his closest allies. Contrary to expectations that Schroeder would be tangling with the environmentalist Greens party, with which he is negotiating to form a new government, the power plays grabbing headlines here are being waged by his fellow Social Democrats.
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerhard Schroeder, the suave and media-savvy governor of Lower Saxony, ousted German Chancellor Helmut Kohl in a splintered federal election Sunday, sending Europe's longest-serving leader into retirement and ending an era that witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall and German reunification.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's late afternoon, and the cultural center of this northwest German manufacturing city is filling up fast. The stairway entrance is decorated with depressing unemployment statistics, but the mood in the ballroom is upbeat: A pianist is belting out amplified big band favorites, the tables are decked with bottles of on-the-house beer, and people are waving banners with slogans like "It's About Jobs." The lights go down.
WORLD
October 13, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, who has led Germany since 1998, told an audience of union members in his home city of Hanover that he would not play a role in the next government. Schroeder was speaking two days after his Social Democrats said he was ready to allow conservative Angela Merkel to lead a power-sharing government of their two parties.
WORLD
September 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and conservative leader Angela Merkel met for the first time since Sunday's election but showed no signs of settling a bitter standoff over who won the vote and who should lead Germany if their parties are forced into a coalition. Merkel's party won 27.8%, and the Christian Social Union won 7.4%, giving their alliance 35.2%. Schroeder's party won 34.3%.
WORLD
September 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and conservative leader Angela Merkel met for the first time since Sunday's election but showed no signs of settling a bitter standoff over who won the vote and who should lead Germany if their parties are forced into a coalition. Merkel's party won 27.8%, and the Christian Social Union won 7.4%, giving their alliance 35.2%. Schroeder's party won 34.3%.
WORLD
September 20, 2005 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
And the new chancellor is: Nobody knows. Germany was in political disarray Monday as Mercedes caravans carrying party leaders raced through the capital's streets and backroom whisperings were later finessed into sound bites. But it may take liberals and conservatives weeks to form a coalition government following a Sunday election that jolted the nation into uncertainty by giving no party a mandate.
WORLD
July 2, 2005 | Christian Retzlaff, Times Staff Writer
Facing high unemployment and an inability to reform the welfare state, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder deliberately lost a confidence vote in Parliament on Friday, opening the way for early elections that are expected to push his liberal coalition from power. Schroeder called for the vote after a series of political defeats and widening divisions within his Social Democratic Party over how to reform one of Europe's most generous welfare systems.
WORLD
January 13, 2005 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
The politics of disaster can be tricky, but German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's passionate and decisive responses to the tsunami tragedy are boosting him in the polls at a time when his domestic programs are under attack. Schroeder has blended deep emotion with political pragmatism in what is viewed in government circles here as an attempt to accomplish two goals. The first is to comfort his nation, which has at least 60 dead and hundreds missing in the southern Asian tsunami.
WORLD
February 7, 2004 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Christian Retzlaff, Times Staff Writers
In a sign of how much his economic reforms have angered the liberal core of his party, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder surprised the nation Friday by taking a political gamble and resigning as leader of the Social Democratic Party. The abrupt move marked the widening divide between one of Europe's oldest political parties and Schroeder's attempts to overhaul the nation's generous welfare state.
WORLD
January 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder will become the first German leader to attend a commemoration of the 1944 D-day landings in June, after being invited by France. Ten years ago, Paris did not ask Chancellor Helmut Kohl to the high-profile 50th anniversary. French President Jacques Chirac's invitation marks a gesture of reconciliation contrasting with that apparent snub. "Mr.
WORLD
January 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder will become the first German leader to attend a commemoration of the 1944 D-day landings in June, after being invited by France. Ten years ago, Paris did not ask Chancellor Helmut Kohl to the high-profile 50th anniversary. French President Jacques Chirac's invitation marks a gesture of reconciliation contrasting with that apparent snub. "Mr.
NEWS
May 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Far-right Austrian politician Joerg Haider lashed out at German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, accusing him of behaving like a "19th century feudal lord" during a weekend visit to Vienna. Schroeder avoided officials from Haider's Freedom Party when he visited Austria on Friday and Saturday. And he said he didn't believe that the European Union had erred when it imposed sanctions on Austria last year after the Freedom Party joined the national government.
WORLD
October 18, 2003 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder claimed a symbolic victory Friday when German lawmakers approved tax cuts worth about $21 billion and agreed to begin overhauling an entrenched welfare state that many say has weakened the world's third-largest economy. The votes by the lower house of Parliament were a boost to Schroeder's politically dangerous plan to scale back Europe's most generous welfare system.
WORLD
May 17, 2003 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Robin Wright, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell met Friday with German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder in an effort to repair a battered transatlantic relationship and reach an agreement on Washington's desire to end 12 years of international economic sanctions against Iraq. On a windy day in a capitol clattering with construction, Schroeder -- whose opposition to the Iraq war drew the ire of the Bush administration -- indicated that he supports the quick dismantling of the United Nations sanctions.
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