Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGerman Democratic Republic
IN THE NEWS

German Democratic Republic

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1989
As one of many U.S. citizens filled with hope over the destruction of the Berlin Wall, I believe it is time for our own government to take a stand equally committed to personal liberty, the essence of democracy. The United States should end its restrictions on travel to Cuba. It is hypocritical for President Bush to cheer the actions of the German Democratic Republic while he denies to his own people the right to move freely across political boundaries. ROSALIE SCHWARTZ, San Diego
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It takes a lot of confidence, not to mention nerve, for a small German film to arrive in theaters in the heart of the holiday season and face off against the formidable behemoths of Hollywood. "Barbara," however, has a secret weapon: It's one terrific film, as smart, thoughtful and emotionally involving as just about anything that's out there. Winner of the Berlin Film Festival's Silver Bear for writer-director Christian Petzold and starring a luminous Nina Hoss, Petzold's frequent collaborator and one of Germany's top actresses, "Barbara" has another advantage: its Soviet-era, behind-the-Iron Curtain setting allows it to investigate the kinds of complex and compelling moral dilemmas endemic to that time and place.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
December 31, 1995
In his Nov. 19 letter to the editor ("Difficult Drive"), R.J. Warren cited difficult road conditions in the former East Germany. Last summer, my wife and I took an extended trip through France, Germany and the Czech Republic. In the former German Democratic Republic, we visited Potsdam (as beautiful as Versailles), Berlin, Leipzig and Dresden--all historic cities with rich heritages that go back to the 12th century, all beautifully rebuilt. There was a lot of road renovation throughout Germany, as well as in France and the Czech Republic, and we also found the same kind of traffic detours that exist here in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
A totalitarian state with a Kafkaesque bureaucracy, East Germany was a nation suffused with fear and suspicion. Yet it was also a society in which utopian ideals motivated individual sacrifices in the name of building a better way of life. The new film "Barbara" examines the contradictions of the former German Democratic Republic, transforming the everyday paranoia under the socialist regime into a quietly gripping thriller. "Barbara" won the Silver Bear prize for director and co-writer Christian Petzold at the Berlin International Film Festival and is Germany's submission for the foreign-language Academy Award.
TRAVEL
November 19, 1995
I read "Das Train" (Oct. 22) with great interest because we recently visited Germany. In your article, there was no mention of driving through the former German Democratic Republic. That was wise. The former East Germany is a land of wonderful people, beautiful countryside and absolute disaster when it comes to travel by automobile. At best, there are two-lane roads in most parts of the country. At worst there are no roads at all. The new unified German government is trying diligently to undo 40 years of deterioration.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It takes a lot of confidence, not to mention nerve, for a small German film to arrive in theaters in the heart of the holiday season and face off against the formidable behemoths of Hollywood. "Barbara," however, has a secret weapon: It's one terrific film, as smart, thoughtful and emotionally involving as just about anything that's out there. Winner of the Berlin Film Festival's Silver Bear for writer-director Christian Petzold and starring a luminous Nina Hoss, Petzold's frequent collaborator and one of Germany's top actresses, "Barbara" has another advantage: its Soviet-era, behind-the-Iron Curtain setting allows it to investigate the kinds of complex and compelling moral dilemmas endemic to that time and place.
OPINION
September 10, 2005
SAY THIS ABOUT CHANCELLOR Gerhard Schroeder: He is a strong closer. Long written off as a sure loser in the Sept. 18 election, Germany's leader is now inching up in the polls, hoping to pull off an upset victory akin to his come-from-behind 2002 win. At the very least, he'd like to deny the conservative Christian Democratic Union an outright victory and force it into a coalition government.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
A totalitarian state with a Kafkaesque bureaucracy, East Germany was a nation suffused with fear and suspicion. Yet it was also a society in which utopian ideals motivated individual sacrifices in the name of building a better way of life. The new film "Barbara" examines the contradictions of the former German Democratic Republic, transforming the everyday paranoia under the socialist regime into a quietly gripping thriller. "Barbara" won the Silver Bear prize for director and co-writer Christian Petzold at the Berlin International Film Festival and is Germany's submission for the foreign-language Academy Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Don't expect to see a segment on China in Patrick Watson's 10-part series "The Struggle for Democracy," coming to public television stations next month. The rumblings that led to the massive student uprisings in Beijing caught the TV journalist and documentary film maker, like a lot of other people, by surprise. For that matter, don't expect more than a minute or two of news clips from the Philippines, where Corazon Aquino's democratic revolution took place just before Watson began filming in the spring of 1986.
WORLD
November 8, 2009 | By Henry Chu
Valentin Geissler has no memory of the wall. He was just 10 months old when it fell, and most of its traces have by now disappeared. But it still hovers over the city like a ghostly presence. "Sometimes I can see in the city where the wall was. . . . I don't remember specifically when I was told [about it]. I guess I kind of grew up with this knowledge." But the wall didn't play a big role in his childhood, not the way it had loomed over the lives of his parents. The restrictions, privations and other hardships of life in the former East Berlin are an alien concept.
WORLD
November 8, 2009 | By Henry Chu
Valentin Geissler has no memory of the wall. He was just 10 months old when it fell, and most of its traces have by now disappeared. But it still hovers over the city like a ghostly presence. "Sometimes I can see in the city where the wall was. . . . I don't remember specifically when I was told [about it]. I guess I kind of grew up with this knowledge." But the wall didn't play a big role in his childhood, not the way it had loomed over the lives of his parents. The restrictions, privations and other hardships of life in the former East Berlin are an alien concept.
OPINION
September 10, 2005
SAY THIS ABOUT CHANCELLOR Gerhard Schroeder: He is a strong closer. Long written off as a sure loser in the Sept. 18 election, Germany's leader is now inching up in the polls, hoping to pull off an upset victory akin to his come-from-behind 2002 win. At the very least, he'd like to deny the conservative Christian Democratic Union an outright victory and force it into a coalition government.
TRAVEL
December 31, 1995
In his Nov. 19 letter to the editor ("Difficult Drive"), R.J. Warren cited difficult road conditions in the former East Germany. Last summer, my wife and I took an extended trip through France, Germany and the Czech Republic. In the former German Democratic Republic, we visited Potsdam (as beautiful as Versailles), Berlin, Leipzig and Dresden--all historic cities with rich heritages that go back to the 12th century, all beautifully rebuilt. There was a lot of road renovation throughout Germany, as well as in France and the Czech Republic, and we also found the same kind of traffic detours that exist here in California.
TRAVEL
November 19, 1995
I read "Das Train" (Oct. 22) with great interest because we recently visited Germany. In your article, there was no mention of driving through the former German Democratic Republic. That was wise. The former East Germany is a land of wonderful people, beautiful countryside and absolute disaster when it comes to travel by automobile. At best, there are two-lane roads in most parts of the country. At worst there are no roads at all. The new unified German government is trying diligently to undo 40 years of deterioration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1989
As one of many U.S. citizens filled with hope over the destruction of the Berlin Wall, I believe it is time for our own government to take a stand equally committed to personal liberty, the essence of democracy. The United States should end its restrictions on travel to Cuba. It is hypocritical for President Bush to cheer the actions of the German Democratic Republic while he denies to his own people the right to move freely across political boundaries. ROSALIE SCHWARTZ, San Diego
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1989 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Don't expect to see a segment on China in Patrick Watson's 10-part series "The Struggle for Democracy," coming to public television stations next month. The rumblings that led to the massive student uprisings in Beijing caught the TV journalist and documentary film maker, like a lot of other people, by surprise. For that matter, don't expect more than a minute or two of news clips from the Philippines, where Corazon Aquino's democratic revolution took place just before Watson began filming in the spring of 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Hit Show: "Secrets, Dialogues, Revelations: The Art of Betye and Alison Saar," the first joint exhibition by the Los Angeles veteran artist Betye and her now New York-based daughter Alison, looks to be one of UCLA Wight Art Gallery's best attended shows in recent years. According to figures released Tuesday, 2,266 attended the show in its first week. Already, attendance at the Saar show has equalled "Twelve Artists From the German Democratic Republic," which has been on view at UCLA since Dec.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | Associated Press
Nutrition experts in East Germany are rallying behind one of the capitalist world's favorite foods--the hamburger. A government nutrition newspaper said those who consider hamburgers "frightful clumps of meat" or the "most insipid product on the face of the Earth" are mistaken. Nutrition Research, in an edition obtained Saturday, pointed out that hamburgers are popular around the world and that the trend "will not stop at the borders of the German Democratic Republic."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|