Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGermans Russia
IN THE NEWS

Germans Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | From Associated Press
Russia and Germany signed a treaty Friday allowing ethnic Germans to resettle on the Volga River, where an autonomous German republic existed until dictator Josef Stalin destroyed it during World War II. The treaty will re-establish an autonomous region open to all ethnic Germans in the former Soviet Union. It was signed by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Valery Makharadze, Nationality Policy Minister Valery Tishkov and Bonn's special envoy for ethnic Germans, Horst Waffenschmidt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 25, 1997 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's Catherine the Great can take credit for an intriguing, little-known facet of California's ethnic cookery. During her reign (1762 to 1796), the former German princess was determined to civilize the lower Volga region, which was overrun with robbers and ruffians, so she opened the doors to German immigrants. She offered land, religious freedom and other incentives for them to settle in the Volga villages. Thousands responded, and all went well for about 100 years.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a decree Monday that will allow ethnic Germans to settle in two regions along the Volga River where their predecessors lived decades ago. The Novosti news agency said the move was the first in a step-by-step rehabilitation of German people who in 1941 were deported by dictator Josef Stalin from their homes along the river to Siberia, Central Asia and Kazakhstan.
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | From Associated Press
Russia and Germany signed a treaty Friday allowing ethnic Germans to resettle on the Volga River, where an autonomous German republic existed until dictator Josef Stalin destroyed it during World War II. The treaty will re-establish an autonomous region open to all ethnic Germans in the former Soviet Union. It was signed by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Valery Makharadze, Nationality Policy Minister Valery Tishkov and Bonn's special envoy for ethnic Germans, Horst Waffenschmidt.
FOOD
June 25, 1997 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's Catherine the Great can take credit for an intriguing, little-known facet of California's ethnic cookery. During her reign (1762 to 1796), the former German princess was determined to civilize the lower Volga region, which was overrun with robbers and ruffians, so she opened the doors to German immigrants. She offered land, religious freedom and other incentives for them to settle in the Volga villages. Thousands responded, and all went well for about 100 years.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | MYRA VANDERPOOL GORMLEY
Question: Where can I find information about an ancestor who was a wagon master? He worked out of either Independence or St. Louis, Mo., and led wagon trains to California. Answer: Check with Society of California Pioneers, 456 McAllister St., San Francisco 94102 to see if they have any biographical material pertaining to him in their Overland Records collection. The State Historical Society of Missouri, 1020 Lowry St., Columbia, Mo.
FOOD
August 13, 1997
I want to thank you for the wonderful article on German cooking ("Children of Catherine the Great: the Germans From Russia," June 25). What a surprise to suddenly see a recipe for beerocks. It was so exciting to read another family's history so similar; my family's origin was from White Russia also. They traveled to settlements in South America and Canada and then finally settled in Oregon and Washington around 1910. My German grandmother passed away several years ago, and as with other families, the recipes were lost with her. I had tried on several occasions when I was a girl to get her to recite to me everything she did and added to the bowl, but when trying to cook from my old notes with a pinch of this and that, not much turns out right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fritz Hirschberger, 91, a Holocaust survivor who in retirement depicted his memories of Nazi Germany in stark, angry paintings, died Jan. 8 in San Francisco of natural causes. When Hirschberger exhibited his work at Los Angeles' Heritage Gallery in 1988, a Times critic commented that the artist's "figuration is built from supple Teutonic dark lines that describe hollow eyes or resigned grimaces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996 | Jerry Hicks
It was 10 years ago that Carole Elliott's close friend and roommate, Robert Frazier, died of AIDS. She'd been living in a house in Huntington Beach with Frazier and two other gay men. "We were all just devastated," she recalls. One week he was found to have bronchitis, and two weeks later he was dead. Soon after that Elliott ran into a friend, Elizabeth Dorn Parker, who was about to begin duties as the one-woman staff for a fledgling group called AIDS Walk Orange County.
BOOKS
September 5, 2004 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Dark Voyage A Novel Alan Furst Random House: 260 pp., $24.95 * The Society A Novel Michael Palmer Bantam: 368 pp., $25 * Semiautomatic A Novel Robert Reuland Random House: 256 pp., $24.95 * Deadline in Athens An Inspector Costas Haritos Mystery Petros Markaris Translated from the Greek by David Connolly Grove Press: 296 pp., $23 * "No man will be a sailor," quoth Dr.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin signed a decree Monday that will allow ethnic Germans to settle in two regions along the Volga River where their predecessors lived decades ago. The Novosti news agency said the move was the first in a step-by-step rehabilitation of German people who in 1941 were deported by dictator Josef Stalin from their homes along the river to Siberia, Central Asia and Kazakhstan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a modern corporate face, the oil industry, the world's largest business, has always operated in an arena of adventure, global power and human eccentricity. Now, the latest blockbuster series from public television makes the industry accessible to everyone in eight hours of spellbinding TV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Cathedral of the Plains is a remarkable testament to the piety of 19th-century immigrants and the hardy missionary friars who came to the Kansas plains to minister to them. This Catholic church is officially called St. Fidelis Church, and it is not officially a cathedral, which is a bishop's church. But the imposing structure, visible for miles from nearby Interstate 70, is one of the state's most-recognized buildings and attracts more than 10,000 visitors a year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|