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April 10, 2010
World Cup 2010: GERMANY FIFA ranking: 6 Overall World Cup record: 37-12-9 Coach: Joachim Low Best performance: Winner, 1954, 1974, 1990 Overview: It will be difficult for Low and his team to recapture the magical summer of 2006, when Germany, playing at home, finished third after a series of better-than-expected performances that won over the fans. The team has no out-and-out star, but it was unbeaten at 8-0-2 in qualifying and has reached at least the quarterfinals of every World Cup since 1982.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Like most kids growing up in Brazil, Roberto Gurgel dreamed of being on the field for a World Cup. That never happened. So this summer, Gurgel is settling for the next-best thing by helping to build five of the fields that will be used for the first World Cup in his native country in 64 years. Gurgel is executive director of research for Sod Solutions, a South Carolina-based company that develops and licenses varieties of grass. One of those varieties, a deep blue-green Bermuda called Celebration, will be used in five of the 12 World Cup venues this summer.
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OPINION
March 15, 2010 | By Thomas Meaney and Harris Mylonas
Why did it take four months for Europe's parent nations -- Germany and France -- to prop up the continent's prodigal son, Greece? And what can the European Union do when it comes to coping with such behavior with its other children? There is little doubt Greece needs to face up to the part it played in its current financial mess -- in which its ballooning deficit threatened the stability of the nation and the euro. But it now appears that in the case of Germany, at least, the slow response was more than meets the eye. Chancellor Angela Merkel was not simply pandering to her fragile coalition and frustrated electorate.
SPORTS
April 22, 2014 | By Vincent Bevins and Kevin Baxter
RIO DE JANEIRO - In 50 days the best athletes in the world's most popular sport will convene in Brazil, one of soccer's sacred spiritual homes, for the game's most important tournament. It will be a powerful, uplifting tribute to the "beautiful game" that Brazilians have shaped for decades and the new status of a confident, rising global power in Latin America. Locals and foreigners will marvel at shiny new stadiums and glide across the continent-sized country on upgraded infrastructure.
TRAVEL
June 6, 2010 | By Susan Spano
THE BEST WAY TO OBERAMMERGAU From LAX, Lufthansa flies nonstop to Munich. Air France, United, British, Delta, US Airways and KLM offer connecting service (change of planes). Restricted round-trip fares begin at $1,040. WHERE TO STAY During Passion play summer, most hotel rooms in the village are sold as part of packages by the town of Oberammergau. THE PLAY The Passion play, 9a Eugen-Papst St., 82487 Oberammergau, Germany, http://www.oberammergau-passion.com, is performed on Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday through Oct. 3. The performance begins at 2:30 pm and lasts for six hours, with a three-hour break for dinner.
TRAVEL
October 15, 2010
If you go THE BEST WAY TO ELMAU, GERMANY From LAX, Lufthansa offers nonstop service, and United, Lufthansa, KLM, Air France and British offer connecting service (change of planes) to Munich. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $416. The spa is about 80 miles southwest of Munich via the A95 highway. Schloss Elmau Luxury Spa & Cultural Hideaway , 82493 Elmau/Oberbayern; (49) 8823-180, http://www.schloss-elmau.de/english/index.html. It has three swimming pools, six restaurants, two concert halls, a spa and a range of summer and winter sports.
OPINION
January 25, 2013
Re "Author inspired by Haley," Obituary, Jan 23 Author and magazine editor Hans Massaquoi, the son of a German mother and a Liberian father, believed that he was spared the fate of German Jews because "blacks were so few in number that they were relegated to low-priority status on the Nazi lineup for extermination. " This may be partly true, because blacks in Germany were indeed rare at the time. But to the typical German under Nazi rule, a black man would be considered something akin to viewing a circus attraction, strange but not primarily an "inferior" non-Aryan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990
A unified Germany after only 45 years. Who will tell the dead? MRS. W. SHUGART La Habra Heights
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994
Re "Germany Asks for Poland's Forgiveness," Aug. 2: As a former Polish citizen and "a victim of the war," I would rather see German President Roman Herzog's apology accompanied by Germany's intense pursuit of still unpunished Nazi criminals and a forceful crackdown on the rise of neo-Nazis in Germany today. Perhaps then his plea "for forgiveness for what has been done to you by Germans" would have more credibility. IRVING FELD Encino
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1991
How can President Bush declare a curb on arms sales to the Middle East (front page, May 30) and hold only the United States, the Soviet Union, China, Great Britain and France responsible as "the major suppliers" of such weapons? How can he leave out Germany? Who built Hussein's poison gas plants? Who modernized his Scud missiles to reach Israel and Saudi Arabia? Who supplied Iraq with the components to build the gas centrifuges needed to separate uranium-238 from uranium-235, a key step in producing weapons-grade nuclear material?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By David Ng
Cornelius Gurlitt , the German man who had been hiding more than 1,000 works of art -- some believed to have been looted during World War II -- has reached an agreement with German officials regarding his secret stash. The two sides issued a statement Monday saying that Gurlitt would cooperate with authorities to determine which of the pieces he's holding had been seized by Nazi forces. Gurlitt has agreed to return art that is linked to Nazi looting and will keep pieces that are not. A copy of the announcement was posted Monday on Gurlitt 's official website.
WORLD
April 2, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - It was a German-born Russian empress, Catherine the Great, who first annexed Crimea more than two centuries ago. Can another strong-willed German woman - who keeps a portrait of Catherine in her Berlin office as a symbol of visionary leadership - loosen Russia's renewed grip on the peninsula? Many in the West are pinning their hopes on Angela Merkel, Germany's long-serving chancellor, to stand at the forefront of a potent, united response by Europe to Russia's seizure of Crimea from Ukraine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
MARCH 28-AUG. 25 'In the Land of Snow: Buddhist Art of the Himalayas' Pasadena's Norton Simon Museum is well-known for having the most impressive collection of European Old Master and early Modern paintings in Los Angeles. Less familiar is the museum's exceptional Indian, Nepalese and Tibetan art. This show will chronicle the movement of Buddhism from India to the Himalayas more than a thousand years ago, bringing numerous important loans together with superlative examples of painting, sculpture, ritual and decorative arts from the Simon's own collection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
In a speech to Jewish leaders in Los Angeles on Thursday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drew parallels between Nazi Germany and Iran, warning of dire consequences if anti-Jewish rhetoric is allowed to go unchecked. "There is a regime today that calls daily for our annihilation, openly and unabashedly," Netanyahu told a crowd of several hundred people gathered at the Museum of Tolerance, which houses Holocaust-related materials. "Our principal lesson in history is that when someone says they're going to annihilate you, take them seriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Dismayed at how German authorities have handled a ballyhooed seizure of suspected Nazi-looted art, an 88-year-old Holocaust survivor from New York City is suing them for the return of a painting he says was stolen in the late 1930s from his great uncle in Germany. David Toren's suit in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., alleges that the Federal Republic of Germany and the Free State of Bavaria have "perpetuate[d] the persecution of Nazi victims" by not expeditiously returning artworks they seized in 2012 from Cornelius Gurlitt, the elderly son of an art expert who was known for acquiring looted art for Adolf Hitler.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
When plans for a Holocaust memorial in Berlin were announced years ago, German writer Martin Walser wondered how many monuments to shame his country would have to build. It was a telling sentiment for a nation that could not cleanse the past yet wanted its young freed from the stain of their Nazi ancestors. The ruin of World War II - bones of the fallen are still occasionally dug up in forests outside Berlin - led to decades of national silence, anger, reparation and collective guilt.
TRAVEL
August 15, 2010 | From The Los Angeles Times
We were fortunate to stay at a bed-and-breakfast called Pension Haus Weller. The place is very comfortable, and the owners are some of the finest people one comes across in life. White wines from the region are superb. The three days we spent in the region will remain in our memory for a long time to come. Pension Haus Weller, 1 Ritter-Schwalbach-Strasse, Boppard on the Rhein, Germany; 011-49-6742-2436, http://www.haus-weller.de . Doubles from $66. Mohan Ratwani, Rolling Hills Estates
SPORTS
February 22, 2014 | By Stacy St. Clair
SOCHI, Russia - U.S. bobsled pilot Steven Holcomb planned to sleep well Saturday night, but he wouldn't say the same for his German competitors. Holcomb's four-man crew sits in fourth place after the first day of competition, just one-hundredth of a second behind Germany's top sled. It's not the placement that the defending Olympic champion wanted, but he insisted he still liked his team's chances. "We're not upset," Holcomb said after his first two runs Saturday. "We're a hundredth out of third place.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Stacy St. Clair
SOCHI, Russia - There are few bigger honors for an Olympian than being asked to carry your nation's flag in the opening ceremony - especially when your country is playing host. Still, two-time Olympic medalist Alexander Zubkov, Russia's top bobsled driver, nearly refused the job. "I said I wanted to think it over, consult my family and especially my wife," he said. "I also talked to the boys on my team. Some of them are superstitious and there is a belief that if you carry the flag you won't win. " FRAMEWORK: Best images from Sochi In the end and with his team's blessing, Zubkov accepted the honor.
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