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Germany Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
April 20, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soot-stained windows, derelict cranes and an olfactory sting from lingering coal dust would hardly seem the stuff of civic pride and nostalgia. But here in Germany's rust belt, the Ruhr River valley known as the Ruhrgebiet, one person's reminder of pollution and oppressed labor is another's monument to those whose sweat and blisters brought about an age of industrial prowess.
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NEWS
July 12, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the 16 million Germans caught on the wrong side of the Cold War divide, man's home was never intended to be his castle. Home, during the Communist era, was the human toolbox. It was the space where workers were stored overnight, the containers that held them until their brains or brawn were needed in the morning. The architects of the classless society perfected the art of cutting construction corners.
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NEWS
February 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government announced an immediate $3.4 billion in aid to the former East Germany, and Economics Minister Juergen Moellemann outlined a $7-billion plan to help the five eastern German states. Kohl called on industry and society to join forces to support those states, where 2.6 million workers are jobless or underemployed.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soot-stained windows, derelict cranes and an olfactory sting from lingering coal dust would hardly seem the stuff of civic pride and nostalgia. But here in Germany's rust belt, the Ruhr River valley known as the Ruhrgebiet, one person's reminder of pollution and oppressed labor is another's monument to those whose sweat and blisters brought about an age of industrial prowess.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Construction cranes, dotting the horizon of Berlin as Germany builds its once and future capital, reflect the confidence that is rising throughout Europe these days. As the Continent moves toward the January introduction of a single currency--the euro--experts are counting the superlatives. Having all the stock markets trade in a single currency "will create the world's second-largest equity market after the U.S.," says a research paper from the Deutsche Bank.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three and a half years ago, this agreeably situated village of 243, tucked beneath pine forests southeast of Berlin, was held up to the world as a symbol of Germany at its xenophobic worst. In August 1993, Dolgenbrodt's residents were reported to have paid neo-Nazis to firebomb a local youth hostel, just in time to keep the state government of Brandenburg from settling a group of African asylum-seekers there.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the 16 million Germans caught on the wrong side of the Cold War divide, man's home was never intended to be his castle. Home, during the Communist era, was the human toolbox. It was the space where workers were stored overnight, the containers that held them until their brains or brawn were needed in the morning. The architects of the classless society perfected the art of cutting construction corners.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the decades, the pine forest has edged in along the fringes of Test Pad 7, and grass now covers much of its cracked, weathered concrete apron. But the substructure--the exhaust ducts, the observation gangways and the gantry tracks--remain clearly identifiable as the place where a team headed by a 30-year-old German scientist named Wernher von Braun presided over the birth of the Space Age nearly half a century ago. Here, on Oct.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By midweek, the young editor and his fledgling 10-member staff would be working through the night to get the newspaper out. But now it was only Monday and he had time--a little--to talk. "We've had to learn a lot in a very short time and, by some miracle, we've done it," said Jan Peter, 21, the editor in chief of a precocious new weekly called Leipzig's Other Newspaper. "We've learned very fast; I'm not sure we've learned well," Peter added.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his fashionable suit and Pepsodent smile, attorney Juerg Brickwedde seems as though he could easily step into an episode of "L.A. Law," a confident, young professional with BMWs to buy and tropical vacations to plan. But in truth, Brickwedde has been living for the last four months in a tiny bedroom behind his office, bathing in the cellar sink two floors below and eating hot-plate suppers--"scrambled eggs, mostly. Cereal, if I don't want to cook."
TRAVEL
March 28, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
We're surrounded. We stand on an observation deck above the Potsdamer Platz, once among the liveliest intersections in Europe, then one of the deadliest, now a hard-hat zone. Builders' cranes rise on all sides, like skeletal dinosaurs. Dozens of pink and blue pipes suck ground water from the damp earth and snake through the area like extension cords of the gods.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Construction cranes, dotting the horizon of Berlin as Germany builds its once and future capital, reflect the confidence that is rising throughout Europe these days. As the Continent moves toward the January introduction of a single currency--the euro--experts are counting the superlatives. Having all the stock markets trade in a single currency "will create the world's second-largest equity market after the U.S.," says a research paper from the Deutsche Bank.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three and a half years ago, this agreeably situated village of 243, tucked beneath pine forests southeast of Berlin, was held up to the world as a symbol of Germany at its xenophobic worst. In August 1993, Dolgenbrodt's residents were reported to have paid neo-Nazis to firebomb a local youth hostel, just in time to keep the state government of Brandenburg from settling a group of African asylum-seekers there.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his fashionable suit and Pepsodent smile, attorney Juerg Brickwedde seems as though he could easily step into an episode of "L.A. Law," a confident, young professional with BMWs to buy and tropical vacations to plan. But in truth, Brickwedde has been living for the last four months in a tiny bedroom behind his office, bathing in the cellar sink two floors below and eating hot-plate suppers--"scrambled eggs, mostly. Cereal, if I don't want to cook."
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Strewn across an open field as far as the eye can see near this little farming community lie pieces of the old Berlin Wall, as broken and useless as the idea the infamous structure vainly tried to protect.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the decades, the pine forest has edged in along the fringes of Test Pad 7, and grass now covers much of its cracked, weathered concrete apron. But the substructure--the exhaust ducts, the observation gangways and the gantry tracks--remain clearly identifiable as the place where a team headed by a 30-year-old German scientist named Wernher von Braun presided over the birth of the Space Age nearly half a century ago. Here, on Oct.
TRAVEL
March 28, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
We're surrounded. We stand on an observation deck above the Potsdamer Platz, once among the liveliest intersections in Europe, then one of the deadliest, now a hard-hat zone. Builders' cranes rise on all sides, like skeletal dinosaurs. Dozens of pink and blue pipes suck ground water from the damp earth and snake through the area like extension cords of the gods.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Strewn across an open field as far as the eye can see near this little farming community lie pieces of the old Berlin Wall, as broken and useless as the idea the infamous structure vainly tried to protect.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government announced an immediate $3.4 billion in aid to the former East Germany, and Economics Minister Juergen Moellemann outlined a $7-billion plan to help the five eastern German states. Kohl called on industry and society to join forces to support those states, where 2.6 million workers are jobless or underemployed.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By midweek, the young editor and his fledgling 10-member staff would be working through the night to get the newspaper out. But now it was only Monday and he had time--a little--to talk. "We've had to learn a lot in a very short time and, by some miracle, we've done it," said Jan Peter, 21, the editor in chief of a precocious new weekly called Leipzig's Other Newspaper. "We've learned very fast; I'm not sure we've learned well," Peter added.
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