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NEWS
December 23, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who, at the beginning of the Yugoslav wars, would have thought that Germany would become the refuge of choice for the shellshocked, homeless Muslims of Bosnia-Herzegovina? Just three years ago, Germany was being pilloried, with critics calling it an abject failure in protecting foreigners already in its midst. Racist skinheads and neo-Nazis were prowling its streets, roughing up Africans, laying siege to Vietnamese workers' hostels, chanting, "Foreigners out!"
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NEWS
February 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nearly half of young Germans believe that there are too many foreigners in the country and one in 10 between the ages of 14 and 17 think that Nazism was a good idea, a survey by the Forsa institute found. The poll of 1,106 Germans between the ages of 14 and 25 found that 46% of those surveyed in the former communist east and 40% in the west believe that there are too many foreigners in the country. The survey also found that 11% between 14 and 17 believe that National Socialism was a good idea.
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NEWS
December 8, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An agreement between Germany's mainstream political parties on how to limit the influx of foreign asylum seekers into the country has the earmarks of an important breakthrough in the fight to reduce the level of right-wing extremism. The accord, which was reached just before midnight Sunday following more than 50 hours of intense, sometimes bitter negotiations spread over two weekends, will effectively end a virtual open-door policy for anyone declaring political asylum in Germany.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 50-year-old lawyer exiled from Iran and the newborn daughter of Turkish immigrants have something unusual in common: Both rushed to take advantage of an eased citizenship law that took effect New Year's Day but that has failed to impress many other potential Germans. Behjat Moaali, a human rights lawyer in Kiel, turned in her papers months ahead to become the first naturalized citizen under the new rules that could put German passports in the hands of half this country's 7.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | Associated Press
More than half a million people took to the streets in cities across Germany on Sunday, hours after arsonists threw firebombs at a refugee shelter in the Baltic coastal city of Greifswald. Police in Greifswald said that about 25 refugees from Romania and several African countries were in the shelter when two firebombs were thrown onto a balcony overnight. Minor damage was reported, but no one was hurt.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
A young neo-Nazi accused of the arson deaths of a Turkish grandmother and two girls tried to kill himself Wednesday by slashing his wrists, authorities said. The suicide attempt came on the same day the government said it was banning the music of several neo-Nazi rock groups, including one that urges Germans to kill Turkish children and rape their mothers.
NEWS
November 30, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a sense of urgency bordering on desperation, German leaders considered new measures Sunday to better combat the revival of right-wing extremism in the country, but the attacks continued unabated, with police reporting firebombings or assaults against foreigners in six cities. There were no deaths in any of Sunday's attacks.
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | Associated Press
Neo-Nazis launched new assaults on refugee homes in at least 10 eastern German cities, police said Saturday. No serious injuries were reported in the overnight attacks, but the violence bolstered calls for tougher laws to fight the unrest. The violence during the night was a continuation of more than two weeks of concerted attacks on refugee homes by gangs of youths in economically depressed eastern Germany.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
While police used riot gear to fight one of the worst weekends of rightist violence in Germany to date, the nation's leaders searched their own arsenal Sunday for weapons to halt the wave of hate. In more than 20 cities, neo-Nazi youths tossed firebombs at refugee homes, smashed windows, burned cars and fought street battles with increasingly larger, more aggressive contingents of riot police. At least 42 people were arrested.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The German Parliament's Domestic Affairs Committee held an emergency meeting Monday to discuss right-wing violence rocking the country's troubled east but was unable to agree on ways to combat the unrest. Government politicians renewed demands that the opposition Social Democratic Party agree to amend the constitution to limit a stream of foreign refugees coming to Germany in search of political asylum.
NEWS
June 28, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The charred shell of a house overlooking the river in this Baltic port city keeps a dirty secret. Somebody, on a winter night a year and a half ago, was filled with enough hate to torch the four-story building that housed asylum-seekers from Africa and the Middle East, along with new immigrants from Poland. Ten people died, some in the smoke and flames, others when they jumped from windows. Thirty-nine more were injured, some critically.
NEWS
January 19, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 10 people, four of them children, were killed in a suspicious fire early Thursday morning at a hostel for foreign asylum-seekers in the northern city of Lubeck. Police took three German men into custody. If the blaze turns out to have been an arson attack, as widely feared, it would be the worst anti-foreigner atrocity in modern German times and would rekindle fading concerns about the safety of foreigners and minorities in this country.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who, at the beginning of the Yugoslav wars, would have thought that Germany would become the refuge of choice for the shellshocked, homeless Muslims of Bosnia-Herzegovina? Just three years ago, Germany was being pilloried, with critics calling it an abject failure in protecting foreigners already in its midst. Racist skinheads and neo-Nazis were prowling its streets, roughing up Africans, laying siege to Vietnamese workers' hostels, chanting, "Foreigners out!"
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of modern Germany's most emotion-laden trials ended Friday in guilty verdicts for four young men accused of fatally firebombing a Turkish family's house in the western city of Solingen. The 1993 arson attack killed five young women and girls and critically injured three other people, including small children.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germans must accept that their country has become a melting pot with at least 6.5 million immigrants, and they must adopt anti-discrimination laws to fight racism, the government's representative for immigrant affairs said Thursday. Despite a number of fatal extreme-rightist attacks on foreigners in recent years, immigrants are moving to Germany in growing numbers and staying longer, Cornelia Schmalz-Jacobson, the representative for the interests of foreigners, told reporters.
NEWS
October 19, 1993 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cornelia Schmalz-Jacobsen was just a young girl in Nazi Germany, but the lessons she learned are guiding her work half a century later. As a child in war-torn Berlin, she watched her parents rescue hundreds of Jews from the Nazi extermination machine, concealing them from authorities and ultimately helping many flee across the border with false papers. Today, as the official advocate for Germany's 6.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl announced dramatic steps Wednesday to fight a deadly surge of racist violence sweeping Germany and promised "fast" reforms of an 80-year-old citizenship law that could offer foreigners equal rights for the first time ever.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As authorities struggled to contain a potentially explosive mood among minority Turks in the western city of Solingen on Monday, police arrested a 15-year-old boy as one of those involved in the arson attack that claimed the lives of five foreigners. Meanwhile, political leaders in Germany and Turkey worked to calm overheated emotions within the 1.7-million-strong Turkish community here, emotions that threaten a serious domestic crisis.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled in the wooded countryside that sprawls south of Berlin, this tiny village has long served as an escape from urban stress. "A quiet spot for people to take a breath," summed up the community's mayor, Ute Preissler.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state government Tuesday ordered an urgent investigation into reports that residents of a small community near Berlin paid right-wing extremists to burn down a youth hostel refurbished to house asylum-seekers. Although the accusations remain unproven, this macabre twist to the problem of attacks against foreigners has sent a shiver through German officialdom. "This case has the highest priority," said Hans-Otto Braeutigam, justice minister for the eastern state of Brandenburg.
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