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NEWS
January 11, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A running battle between German government officials and the Church of Scientology escalated this week, with 34 prominent Americans from the entertainment industry denouncing Germany for allegedly treating Scientologists as it treated the Jews in 1936, and the German foreign minister accusing the celebrities of "falsifying history."
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NEWS
October 3, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL and TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To the strains of a national anthem that once made the world shiver, a new European era began today: Germany reunited. In several cities but especially here in the old and future capital, Berlin, Germans turned out to celebrate. In front of the famed Reichstag, seat of the last all-German Parliament, a crowd estimated at several hundred thousand turned out to cheer the moment of unity.
NEWS
August 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder was welcomed to his new office in Berlin, marking the first time Germany has been governed from its traditional capital since World War II. "This is a historic moment," Schroeder said as the chancellery was ceremonially transferred to Berlin from its home of 50 years in Bonn. "A dozen years ago, anyone who would have predicted this would have been dismissed as crazy."
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | Reuters
The German government began the long-awaited move from its provisional postwar capital of Bonn to its new home in Berlin on Saturday as the first Cabinet minister and his team made the 380-mile journey eastward. Construction Minister Franz Muentefering, who is also in charge of the move, led the way to Berlin. By the end of the summer, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's government, the 669-member Parliament and 15 ministries will have moved from the Rhine River town of Bonn to Berlin.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The German Parliament bid an emotional goodbye to Bonn after 50 years while saying hello to the country's eighth postwar president, Johannes Rau, and looking forward to the government's return to Berlin. Rau received a warm welcome from thousands of Bonn residents who braved stormy weather to stand in the city's central market square.
NEWS
March 15, 1999 | From Reuters
Oskar Lafontaine on Sunday ended three days of silence over the reason for his abrupt resignation as finance minister by criticizing Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's government for its "poor teamwork." Lafontaine, who quit without a word on Thursday after a power struggle with Schroeder, had refused to explain why he resigned as finance minister and chairman of the ruling Social Democrats.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
With its Nazi past, Germany must take care not to go too far in the fight against terror, President Johannes Rau warned Sunday at the opening of a new exhibit on Nazism. The Nazi era showed how easy it is for a society to abandon its democratic principles, Rau said in Nuremberg, the favored parade grounds for Adolf Hitler's National Socialists.
NEWS
September 14, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In electing a regional parliament Sunday, voters in Germany's most prosperous state gave a decisive victory to Bavaria's conservative Christian Social Union and with it a tail wind to Chancellor Helmut Kohl as he enters the final two weeks of his own reelection battle. With most of the vote counted, CSU, the sister party of Kohl's Christian Democratic Union, had nearly 53% of the vote--the outright majority needed by the party to retain popular Gov.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will Germany's leading newspaper succeed in stopping Big Brother from imposing a confusing language reform on the common people? Will Germans lose respect for the precision and nuance of the written word if official documents spell Schifffahrt--the word for "shipping"--with two Fs instead of three?
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An outbreak of right-wing violence in recent weeks has increased pressure on the government to ban political parties harboring known extremists, but political leaders and law enforcement authorities lamented Wednesday that such a crackdown would only make martyrs of the troublemakers and force them underground.
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