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NEWS
December 24, 1993 | STEVE GUTTERMAN, TIMES MOSCOW BUREAU
Is post-election Russia the equivalent of Germany's hapless Weimar Republic? Comparisons by Russian and Westerners have run so rampant that many now are simply nit-picking over exactly which Weimar year today's Russia resembles most. Is Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, the neo-fascist whose party showed surprising strength in recent parliamentary elections, the Adolf Hitler of 1924, 1929 or 1932? Even Boris N.
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SPORTS
November 4, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL
The German government on Wednesday officially condemned an attack on American luge athletes training in Germany and demanded that the offenders be prosecuted "to the full extent of the law." The statement, read to reporters by a government spokesman in Bonn, came after the incident, apparently racially motivated, was discussed at Chancellor Helmut Kohl's weekly Cabinet meeting.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | From Times Wires Services
The first democratic all-German Parliament in 57 years convened in the historic Reichstag building Thursday, and its senior legislator, Willy Brandt, called on the united nation to shoulder greater global responsibilities. In a keynote speech to the new Bundestag, the policy-making lower house, the 77-year-old former chancellor said that modernizing the former East Germany will be a huge task but must not detract from growing German duties around the world.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With their decisive electoral mandate, voters Sunday propelled Chancellor Helmut Kohl into a new chapter of German history, one filled with challenges far different from those that accompanied unification. He must deal with a series of divisive, potentially explosive issues in both domestic and foreign policy affairs that will require a new level of political courage.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid growing controversy and scandal, the former East German Communist Party on Sunday promised to give up 80% of its vast holdings, estimated at well over $1 billion. "The less there is, the less can be manipulated," the party's beleaguered chairman, Gregor Gysi, told a news conference. The move comes just three weeks before the first free all-German elections in nearly 60 years.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chancellor Helmut Kohl and the opposition Social Democrats agreed to an urgent program of cooperation to help rescue eastern Germany from economic collapse. Kohl and Social Democratic Chairman Hans-Jochen Vogel, meeting amid talk of a possible national unity government to tackle the crisis, set up two working groups to thrash out a joint approach. One group will consider how to deal with the dearth of administrators in eastern Germany and questions about property rights.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | From Reuters
This city, which lost out to Berlin as united Germany's seat of government, was handed a consolation prize Friday when the upper house of Parliament voted, as expected, to stay here for the time being. The small but influential Bundesrat--made up of representatives of Germany's 16 states--voted 38-30 in favor of remaining in this quiet Rhineside town. The powerful lower house, the Bundestag, voted on June 20 to move itself and the government from Bonn to Berlin by the end of the century.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dust had barely settled over the Persian Gulf War battlefields when Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government began laying the groundwork for constitutional changes that would permit German forces to play a future role in such United Nations-approved military operations.
NEWS
January 25, 1991
Iraqi President SADDAM HUSSEIN has responded to a papal peace appeal, saying he shares POPE JOHN PAUL II's concerns for justice and peace, the Vatican said. Spokesman Joaquin Navarro said the Vatican received a reply to the letter the Pope sent Jan. 15. Navarro said Hussein "thanked the Pope for his appeals to avert war and assured him he shares his concerns for justice and peace." . . .
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
Germans celebrated a low-key first birthday as a united nation Thursday, with concern over growing unemployment and neo-Nazism replacing the champagne-swigging euphoria that marked Communist East Germany's dissolution a year ago. Political leaders praised the achievements made in rebuilding the eastern region, which was left in a state of collapse by 40 years of Communist central-planning. Restructuring the economy has left 1 million people in the east jobless.
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