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Gertrude Stein

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Robert Bartlett Haas, a longtime UCLA educator who spent years immersed in the writings of Gertrude Stein, has died. He was 94. Haas died April 20 in a hospital in Nuertingen, Germany, after a brief illness, said his son, Peter. He had spent most of his retirement years in Germany. Haas' interest in Stein, the experimental American writer and poet, dated to his years as an undergraduate student at UC Berkeley. They started corresponding and finally met in 1946, shortly before her death in France at age 72. Haas "was one of the young men who sought out Gertrude Stein as a mentor and was rewarded with years of encouragement and friendship and who, in turn, devoted a measure of his academic life to bolstering Stein's reputation," Timothy Young, curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts at Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, told The Times in an e-mail.
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NATIONAL
March 23, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Juan Gris, recipient of a Google Doodle on the 125th anniversary of his birth, was a Cubist painter who was a legend in his own right. But he seems to have rubbed another legend -- Pablo Picasso -- the wrong way. Gris was a minor player in the art world before he went to France. He was an engineering student in Madrid, took painting lessons and created humorous drawings for local newspapers. But in 1906, he left the country for a French tenement -- a "gloomy heap" that was in the midst of a transformation into an artists enclave.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nobody performs Gertrude Stein these days, and it's fair to wonder if anyone reads her either. Once the seminal voice of the American-in-Paris avant garde of the 1920s, Stein has long been reduced in pop culture to being Alice B. Toklas' companion and to a single line, her patented dismissal of Oakland: "There is no there there." But even if you know only that line, you already have a grasp of Stein's unique way with English.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Before they vote in November, Americans are likely to be asked a $787-billion question: Has the country gotten much benefit from the economic stimulus plan President Obama and Congressional Democrats pushed through last year? Pundits, politicians and party functionaries surely will be putting in their own two cents, if they haven't already. Angelenos, however, have an invitation starting Thursday to see one very tangible outgrowth of the federal spending meant to create jobs amid a frightening economy: a play.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A title is a title is a title. And as titles go, "Prepare for Saints" fills the bill like a rose to a vase. Steven Watson has written an admirable behind-the-scenes Baedeker to the seven years of preparation leading to the smash 1934 Broadway opening of the opera "Four Saints in Three Acts." With libretto by Gertrude Stein, score by Virgil Thomson, stage direction by John Houseman, choreography by Frederick Ashton and featuring an all-black cast playing St. Theresa of Avila, St.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Works of art that take artists as their subject can be risky propositions. All too often it seems they become self-referential to the point of self-reverence, leaving broader appeal by the wayside. This is a particularly common trap in stage biographies, which can easily succumb to precious idolatry if they're not handled carefully.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A younger American composer once described the late Virgil Thomson's music as "enduring, hard, and polished as the Methodist church pew upon which his forebears must have sat." Attending a performance of Thomson's opera "The Mother of Us All" adds another meaning to the "hard church pew" characterization. This tribute to suffragette leader Susan B. Anthony seen through the feminist ideology and quirky prose of librettist Gertrude Stein calls for the patience of well-practiced pew-sitting.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1998 | Robin Rauzi, Robin Rauzi is a Times staff writer
Lamont Johnson first directed Gertrude Stein's play "Yes Is for a Very Young Man" in 1949 in New York. The players? Some unknowns named Bea Arthur, Gene Saks and Kim Stanley. Brooks Atkinson, reviewing the production for the New York Times, wrote, "The Off Broadway actors are not quite that sublime at the moment, and Lamont Johnson, the director, has not found the way to weave Miss Stein's random, prolix remarks into a flowing pattern."
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They were an odd couple. When Gertrude Stein met Thornton Wilder during her U.S. lecture tour in 1934, she was 60, yet a newcomer to public acclaim. Wilder, at 37, chafed at the demands of celebrity but had grown adept at handling the business aspects of authorship since the success of his Pulitzer Prize-winning 1927 novel, "The Bridge of San Luis Rey." Stein, for 30 years a resident of France, had influenced a generation of expatriate American writers, including Ernest Hemingway.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Before they vote in November, Americans are likely to be asked a $787-billion question: Has the country gotten much benefit from the economic stimulus plan President Obama and Congressional Democrats pushed through last year? Pundits, politicians and party functionaries surely will be putting in their own two cents, if they haven't already. Angelenos, however, have an invitation starting Thursday to see one very tangible outgrowth of the federal spending meant to create jobs amid a frightening economy: a play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Robert Bartlett Haas, a longtime UCLA educator who spent years immersed in the writings of Gertrude Stein, has died. He was 94. Haas died April 20 in a hospital in Nuertingen, Germany, after a brief illness, said his son, Peter. He had spent most of his retirement years in Germany. Haas' interest in Stein, the experimental American writer and poet, dated to his years as an undergraduate student at UC Berkeley. They started corresponding and finally met in 1946, shortly before her death in France at age 72. Haas "was one of the young men who sought out Gertrude Stein as a mentor and was rewarded with years of encouragement and friendship and who, in turn, devoted a measure of his academic life to bolstering Stein's reputation," Timothy Young, curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts at Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, told The Times in an e-mail.
TRAVEL
December 7, 2008
There's just no accounting for taste. When we asked readers to talk about the places they visited but thought were overrated, the results amazed us. Can someone really dislike the Grand Canyon? Yes. In fact, two readers did. Others registered their displeasure with Italy; Santa Fe, N.M.; and Washington, D.C. For the complete list of comments, go to latimes.com/overrated . And if you disagree, please leave your comments there. Place: Bali Last visited: 2000 My perspective: It was the ending port of our cruise from Hong Kong to Bali.
BOOKS
October 14, 2007 | Nicholas Delbanco, Nicholas Delbanco is the Robert Frost Distinguished University professor at the University of Michigan. His most recent novel is "Spring and Fall."
I want to start with the title. The "two lives" referred to are those of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, and the author presumes a kind of familiarity, using only their first names. Neither Stein nor Toklas would have welcomed this. In a tip of the cap to Stein's title "Three Lives," the absent third person here is the author herself. The second word in the opening of "Two Lives" is the first-person pronoun, and "I" figures largely throughout.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2006 | From Associated Press
The actors were getting tongue-tied as they struggled to learn the lyrics of a new musical about author Gertrude Stein. One by one, they stumbled and stuttered over lines drawn from Stein's own idiosyncratic works: "And to in and in and six and another." But director Frank Galati and composer Stephen Flaherty have experience in tackling tough material. After all, they helped turn E.L. Doctorow's sprawling novel, "Ragtime," into a Tony Award-winning musical in 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000
Someone should tell distinguished Pomona College alumna Lynda Obst (May 31) that when Gertrude Stein said, "There's no there there," she was speaking of Oakland, not L.A. GORDON COHN Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"The Mother of Us All" is, but for one problem, the ideal candidate for America's national opera. Written in 1945 and 1946 in the glow of World War II victory, it is about suffragette Susan B. Anthony, about battles won and hope for a just American future. It waves flags but not unrealistically. It has, in fact, a subtly wistful tone; its words are Gertrude Stein's last--she died of cancer just as she completed the libretto. Her language is pure American dialect but artfully assembled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000
Someone should tell distinguished Pomona College alumna Lynda Obst (May 31) that when Gertrude Stein said, "There's no there there," she was speaking of Oakland, not L.A. GORDON COHN Long Beach
BOOKS
October 4, 1992
Regarding the photo accompanying the review of "The Continual Pilgrimage" (Sept. 6), has anyone else noticed how much Darryl Gates, left, looks like Gertrude Stein? A cop is a cop is a cop . . . BILL LOVELADY, SAN JACINTO
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nobody performs Gertrude Stein these days, and it's fair to wonder if anyone reads her either. Once the seminal voice of the American-in-Paris avant garde of the 1920s, Stein has long been reduced in pop culture to being Alice B. Toklas' companion and to a single line, her patented dismissal of Oakland: "There is no there there." But even if you know only that line, you already have a grasp of Stein's unique way with English.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A title is a title is a title. And as titles go, "Prepare for Saints" fills the bill like a rose to a vase. Steven Watson has written an admirable behind-the-scenes Baedeker to the seven years of preparation leading to the smash 1934 Broadway opening of the opera "Four Saints in Three Acts." With libretto by Gertrude Stein, score by Virgil Thomson, stage direction by John Houseman, choreography by Frederick Ashton and featuring an all-black cast playing St. Theresa of Avila, St.
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