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Gestational Diabetes

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NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Having diabetes during pregnancy raises the odds of having diabetes later in life, studies have repeatedly shown. But new research on ethnic variations finds the connection is especially true for African American women. A study of more than 77,000 women from researchers at Kaiser Permanente showed that black women -- although they are less likely to develop gestational diabetes than women in other racial and ethnic groups -- have a much higher risk of having the disease later in life if they experienced the condition during pregnancy.
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NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Diabetes prevalence rates jumped dramatically across the nation between 1995 and 2010, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported in Friday's edition of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report . Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, an annual phone survey of adults 18 and older, the investigators found that overall, the median prevalence of diagnosed diabetes went up from 4.5% in 1995 to 8.2% in...
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SCIENCE
October 1, 2009 | Shari Roan
To improve the health of both mother and baby, even women with mild gestational diabetes should receive treatment, researchers now say -- helping resolve a long-standing dilemma in obstetrics. Rates of gestational diabetes have been increasing as more U.S. women enter pregnancy overweight. Moderate to severe cases of the condition have long been treated, but doctors have been uncertain whether women with mild increases in blood-sugar levels warrant additional care. "Health care providers do not wish to over-treat women or unnecessarily alarm them, nor do they wish to impose extra costs, including self-glucose monitoring," said Dr. Mark Landon, the lead investigator and interim chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Ohio State University Medical Center.
HEALTH
April 8, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Pregnant women might now have one more good reason to watch their diet and exercise: A new study links autism and developmental delays in young children to metabolic conditions, like obesity and diabetes, in their mothers. The findings, published in Monday's edition of the journal Pediatrics, found that women who had diabetes or hypertension or were obese were 1.61 times as likely as healthy women to have children with autism spectrum disorders. They also were 2.35 times as likely to have children with developmental delays.
SCIENCE
February 23, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein
Women have long been told that gaining weight before becoming pregnant or being overweight at the start of pregnancy puts them at higher risk for gestational diabetes. But a new study finds that the first trimester is the most crucial time for weight gain that can increase the danger of developing the condition. The study, released Monday in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, looked at data from an ethnically diverse group of women who had babies between 1996 and 1998; 345 women had gestational diabetes, and 800 who had not developed the disease served as a control group.
NEWS
June 14, 1985 | PETER BENNETT, Bennett is a Pasadena free-lance writer. and
At 5:16 p.m. last Sept. 16, Megan Sinclair (not her real name) gave birth to an 11-pound, 23-inch-long boy at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena. "I had to blink and look twice," Sinclair, a petite woman who gained 40 pounds during pregnancy, said. "I thought he'd be big, but not that big." Her normally reserved husband couldn't restrain his pride and joked with the hospital staff that he had fathered the next middle linebacker for the Los Angeles Rams.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Gestational diabetes--a form of diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy--may not be caused by pregnancy as previously believed, according to study results released Thursday by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The condition more likely may be a precursor for the development of adult diabetes in some women, regardless of whether they become pregnant, the institute said.
NEWS
December 16, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Diabetes is a major problem. If you don't think so, consider the latest statistic from the federal government. One in 16 U.S. women who give birth -- more than 250,000 each year -- has diabetes.   Diabetes used to be thought of as a disease of older age. Not anymore. The obesity epidemic has led to more cases of diabetes among children, adolescents and young adults. The new analysis, from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, analyzed data from 2008. Diabetes was defined as either pre-existing disease or gestational diabetes.
HEALTH
March 8, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Increasing obesity rates may have contributed to a 35% rise in pregnancy-related diabetes among California women during the 1990s. Scientists knew that obesity was driving up overall rates of diabetes, but didn't know whether that was also happening with gestational diabetes, which arises in pregnancy, most often in older mothers and African American, Asian, Latina and Native American women.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
The birth in Texas of 16-pound, 1-ounce JaMichael Brown, possibly the largest newborn the Lone Star state has ever seen, raises a few questions. For one, how can babies get so big? According to reports, JaMichael’s size may stem in part from his 39-year-old mother’s gestational diabetes, the type diagnosed during pregnancy. Such mothers tend to have larger babies. Here’s why, from an explainer by the American Diabetes Assn. : “When you have gestational diabetes, your pancreas works overtime to produce insulin, but the insulin does not lower your blood glucose levels.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Having diabetes during pregnancy raises the odds of having diabetes later in life, studies have repeatedly shown. But new research on ethnic variations finds the connection is especially true for African American women. A study of more than 77,000 women from researchers at Kaiser Permanente showed that black women -- although they are less likely to develop gestational diabetes than women in other racial and ethnic groups -- have a much higher risk of having the disease later in life if they experienced the condition during pregnancy.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
In a move hailed by planned-parenting groups and opposed by some religious organizations, health insurance companies will be required to provide women free birth control, in keeping with new Obama administration guidelines. The rules, called "historic" by the Department of Health and Human Services, also say that insurance companies must provide women with other preventive services free of charge. Monday's new quidelines follow the recent advice from an independent panel of doctors and health experts at the Institute of Medicine, which recommended last month that all approved contraception methods -- including the "morning-after pill" -- be provided without requiring co-pays.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
The birth in Texas of 16-pound, 1-ounce JaMichael Brown, possibly the largest newborn the Lone Star state has ever seen, raises a few questions. For one, how can babies get so big? According to reports, JaMichael’s size may stem in part from his 39-year-old mother’s gestational diabetes, the type diagnosed during pregnancy. Such mothers tend to have larger babies. Here’s why, from an explainer by the American Diabetes Assn. : “When you have gestational diabetes, your pancreas works overtime to produce insulin, but the insulin does not lower your blood glucose levels.
NEWS
December 16, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Diabetes is a major problem. If you don't think so, consider the latest statistic from the federal government. One in 16 U.S. women who give birth -- more than 250,000 each year -- has diabetes.   Diabetes used to be thought of as a disease of older age. Not anymore. The obesity epidemic has led to more cases of diabetes among children, adolescents and young adults. The new analysis, from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, analyzed data from 2008. Diabetes was defined as either pre-existing disease or gestational diabetes.
SCIENCE
February 23, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein
Women have long been told that gaining weight before becoming pregnant or being overweight at the start of pregnancy puts them at higher risk for gestational diabetes. But a new study finds that the first trimester is the most crucial time for weight gain that can increase the danger of developing the condition. The study, released Monday in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, looked at data from an ethnically diverse group of women who had babies between 1996 and 1998; 345 women had gestational diabetes, and 800 who had not developed the disease served as a control group.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2009 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
To improve the health of both mother and baby, even women with mild gestational diabetes should receive treatment, researchers say -- helping resolve a long-standing dilemma in obstetrics. Rates of gestational diabetes have been increasing as more U.S. women enter pregnancy overweight. Moderate to severe cases of the condition have long been treated, but doctors have been uncertain whether women with mild increases in blood-sugar levels warrant additional care. "Healthcare providers do not wish to over-treat women or unnecessarily alarm them, nor do they wish to impose extra costs, including self-glucose monitoring," said Dr. Mark Landon, the lead investigator and interim chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Ohio State University Medical Center.
HEALTH
September 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Treating pregnant women for diabetes can help lower the chances their children will be obese, researchers found. Untreated gestational diabetes raises a woman's blood sugar during pregnancy and almost doubles the child's risk of becoming obese by ages 5 to 7. Researchers examined the records of 9,439 mother-child pairs in Oregon, Washington and Hawaii. The women gave birth between 1995 and 2000.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2009 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
To improve the health of both mother and baby, even women with mild gestational diabetes should receive treatment, researchers say -- helping resolve a long-standing dilemma in obstetrics. Rates of gestational diabetes have been increasing as more U.S. women enter pregnancy overweight. Moderate to severe cases of the condition have long been treated, but doctors have been uncertain whether women with mild increases in blood-sugar levels warrant additional care. "Healthcare providers do not wish to over-treat women or unnecessarily alarm them, nor do they wish to impose extra costs, including self-glucose monitoring," said Dr. Mark Landon, the lead investigator and interim chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Ohio State University Medical Center.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2009 | Shari Roan
To improve the health of both mother and baby, even women with mild gestational diabetes should receive treatment, researchers now say -- helping resolve a long-standing dilemma in obstetrics. Rates of gestational diabetes have been increasing as more U.S. women enter pregnancy overweight. Moderate to severe cases of the condition have long been treated, but doctors have been uncertain whether women with mild increases in blood-sugar levels warrant additional care. "Health care providers do not wish to over-treat women or unnecessarily alarm them, nor do they wish to impose extra costs, including self-glucose monitoring," said Dr. Mark Landon, the lead investigator and interim chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Ohio State University Medical Center.
HEALTH
September 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Treating pregnant women for diabetes can help lower the chances their children will be obese, researchers found. Untreated gestational diabetes raises a woman's blood sugar during pregnancy and almost doubles the child's risk of becoming obese by ages 5 to 7. Researchers examined the records of 9,439 mother-child pairs in Oregon, Washington and Hawaii. The women gave birth between 1995 and 2000.
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