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October 18, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
When the Soviet government sold hundreds of paintings from the State Hermitage Museum in Leningrad in the 1930s, including masterpieces by Rembrandt, Raphael and Velazquez, they ended up working closely with one American art gallery: Knoedler & Company in New York. The gallery abruptly closed last year after more than 160 years in business. Now the Getty Research Institute is acquiring for an undisclosed sum the sales books documenting the Hermitage deals, among other resources that make up Knoedler's vast private archives.
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March 13, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
With investment markets booming, the J. Paul Getty Trust, the world's richest visual art institution, saw its endowment rise to $6.2 billion during 2013, approaching its peak of $6.4 billion in mid-2007 before the Great Recession hit. An audited financial statement posted on the Getty's website reflects investment gains totaling $766.74 million from mid-2012 to mid-2013, enough to cover expenses while socking away about $534 million for the endowment....
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
André Breton, the French writer who founded the Surrealist movement in 1924, is widely known to have been a control freak. The so-called Surrealist Pope was happy to anoint and expel followers based on his autocratic judgment of their fealty to what he regarded as the movement's essential principles. What isn't commonly considered is just how conservative Breton was -- odd for a champion of artistic experimentation. But that's one nugget found in "Farewell to Surrealism: The Dyn Circle in Mexico," a small but engaging gem of an exhibition in the gallery of the Getty Research Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
The Getty Research Institute is absorbing yet another chunk of New York City's experimental-arts patrimony, having recently bought a huge archive of video art, video and audio recordings of live performances, photographs, original posters and other materials documenting the first three decades of work created at the Kitchen, a space in lower Manhattan that since 1971 has tried with frequent success to foster creative breakthroughs in visual art, performance...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
After 20 years at the Getty Research Institute, Wim de Wit, the head of the architecture and contemporary art offerings there and co-curator of the current Pacific Standard Time Presents initiative on modern architecture in Los Angeles, is leaving the institution. De Wit is moving to Stanford University, where he'll be an adjunct curator of architecture and design at the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, GRI director Thomas Gaehtgens announced Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2009 | Liesl Bradner
Russian artist Vasily Kamensky's poem about the clash between rural culture and urban growth conjures an absurd image of farm animals dancing the tango. Originating from this image is the title of the Russian poetry exhibit "Tango With Cows: Book Art of the Russian Avant Garde, 1910-1917" at the Getty Research Institute. On display are 36 books of poetry and a variety of interactive materials that explore the little-known period in Russian history that predates the Russian Revolution of 1917.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
It's fair to assume that Getty trustees will look far and wide in their search for a new president to replace the late James Wood. But will they also consider someone closer to home, a leader already inside the Getty Center's travertine walls? In his three years of running the Getty Research Institute, Thomas Gaehtgens has gained the admiration of his staff for making the institute a more open and collaborative place. His employees even wonder whether trustees are looking at him for the top job once held by Wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Thomas W. Gaehtgens, an internationally recognized scholar who is director of the German Center for the History of Art in Paris, will be the new leader of the Getty Research Institute, sources close to the Getty say. His appointment, expected to be announced today, will end a 10-month search for a successor to Thomas Crow, who left the prestigious position to chair the department of modern art history at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Thomas Crow has taken charge of the Getty Research Institute at a propitious moment. Nine months into his job as director of the J. Paul Getty Trust's art history think tank and research library--with views to die for--he is at the helm of an enterprise that's old enough and rich enough to be a rising star in the international galaxy of cultural resources, but still young enough to be malleable. "It isn't like any other place," Crow says of his new professional home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
The Getty Research Institute is absorbing yet another chunk of New York City's experimental-arts patrimony, having recently bought a huge archive of video art, video and audio recordings of live performances, photographs, original posters and other materials documenting the first three decades of work created at the Kitchen, a space in lower Manhattan that since 1971 has tried with frequent success to foster creative breakthroughs in visual art, performance...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By David Ng
A trove of 200,000 photographic items from the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation is being donated to five institutions around the world, including the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the National Gallery of Art in Washington. The collection of photographic material was shot by the late Harry Shunk and Janos Kender, and dates from approximately 1958 to 1973. The two other recipients of the donation are the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Tate in Britain. The Shunk-Kender trove depicts notable artists and other cultural types in the act of creation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By David Ng
The Getty is making a wide selection of art-related images in its digital database available for public use and at no cost. The announcement, which was made on Monday, is part of a Getty-wide move toward open content, according to James Cuno, the organization's president and chief executive officer. Images that fall under the new unrestricted-use guidelines either belong to the Getty or are already in the public domain. Previously, the J. Paul Getty Museum made images available upon request and for a fee, with certain restrictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
After 20 years at the Getty Research Institute, Wim de Wit, the head of the architecture and contemporary art offerings there and co-curator of the current Pacific Standard Time Presents initiative on modern architecture in Los Angeles, is leaving the institution. De Wit is moving to Stanford University, where he'll be an adjunct curator of architecture and design at the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, GRI director Thomas Gaehtgens announced Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Scott Timberg
Much of the time Los Angeles can feel like a huge, messy jigsaw puzzle, with pieces left out - a city that evolved by accident. Parts of it don't work, parts of it seem newly broken, parts are truly luminous - but hidden - and they all seem to have nothing to do with each other. But Christopher Alexander sees things differently. "There was this desire, this strategy, this intent to have Los Angeles evolve in a manner that was unlike any other city," says one of the curators behind the Getty's new Pacific Standard Time architecture initiative.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
André Breton, the French writer who founded the Surrealist movement in 1924, is widely known to have been a control freak. The so-called Surrealist Pope was happy to anoint and expel followers based on his autocratic judgment of their fealty to what he regarded as the movement's essential principles. What isn't commonly considered is just how conservative Breton was -- odd for a champion of artistic experimentation. But that's one nugget found in "Farewell to Surrealism: The Dyn Circle in Mexico," a small but engaging gem of an exhibition in the gallery of the Getty Research Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Kelly Scott
In Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne's full obituary of the pioneering and influential critic Ada Louise Huxtable, he expands upon the news Monday that the Getty Research Institute has acquired her archives. Along with her papers, the Getty will receive those of her husband, industrial designer L. Garth Huxtable, who died in 1989. In addition to the written materials, Huxtable also donated her entire estate to the Getty, including her New York City apartment and a house in Marblehead, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999
I enjoyed Mark Swed's wonderful article about Dick Higgins ("Tribute to Fluxus Founder Has Jarring Effect on Bach Concerto," Dec. 25). I would like to mention that not only does the Getty Research Institute collect Fluxus material, but the Getty also has a large portion of Higgins' papers. The finding aid for the collection can be viewed online at http://www.getty.edu/gri/research/findaids.htm. LYNDA BUNTING Getty Research Institute for the History of Art and the Humanities, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
Ada Louise Huxtable, the architecture critic who in two decades of writing for the New York Times became a powerful force in shaping New York City and was better known than many of the architects she was covering and certainly more feared, has died. She was 91. Huxtable, who in 1970 won the first Pulitzer Prize awarded for criticism, died Monday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, said her lawyer, Robert N. Shapiro. The Getty Center announced Monday that it had acquired her papers, along with those of her husband, industrial designer L. Garth Huxtable, who died in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
Guerrilla Girls, the anonymous women's political art collective that often appears in gorilla masks, has lent its talents  to the bid to defeat a proposed amendment that would write a ban on same-sex marriage into Minnesota's state constitution. Its artwork for the cause is a 14-foot-high by 40-foot-wide billboard image of Minnesota's conservative Republican congresswoman Michele Bachmann, no friend to the gay rights movement. The sign, high above a busy intersection in downtown Minneapolis, deploys a fragmentary quote from Bachmann - “we all have the same civil rights” - to unwillingly enlist her as a spokeswoman for the side she opposes.
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