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NEWS
June 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Interior Department unveiled plans Friday for a $40-million visitors' complex for the Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania, saying it is the best way to preserve the park's historic resources while accommodating its many visitors. The development plan has been the focus of controversy, with some historians arguing the joint government-commercial venture will detract from the park's historic sites. Local merchants also have complained it will take away business.
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NEWS
June 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Interior Department unveiled plans Friday for a $40-million visitors' complex for the Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania, saying it is the best way to preserve the park's historic resources while accommodating its many visitors. The development plan has been the focus of controversy, with some historians arguing the joint government-commercial venture will detract from the park's historic sites. Local merchants also have complained it will take away business.
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NEWS
September 15, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
For 10 summers millions of Americans have viewed an original draft of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address in a vault at the Gettysburg National Cemetery. But last month, James Billington, the Library of Congress' curator for the rare document, announced that "because of preservation concerns" the Gettysburg Address will no longer be available for public display at Gettysburg. Instead, it will be stored away in a box in the Library's Manuscript Division. "I am extremely disappointed.
NEWS
May 28, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The nation honored its war dead Monday with Memorial Day military pomp and pageantry, along with prayers and hope for the 2,500 persons still missing a decade after the end of the Vietnam War. Army Secretary John O. Marsh Jr. promised at a ceremony near the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to continue the push for a full accounting of those missing in action. Marsh said that learning the fate of Vietnam MIAs is "a matter of the highest national priority."
TRAVEL
October 17, 1993 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
The 13th annual Hawaii International Film Festival runs Nov. 7-13 on Oahu, then travels to Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Kauai and the Big Island, Nov. 14-20. Features, documentaries and shorts from Asia, the Pacific and North America, including 22 world premieres and 41 U.S. premieres, are among the 140 works to be shown. Highlights include five newly restored films of renowned Japanese filmmaker Ozu, a series from Hawaii filmmakers and the first IMAX international film fest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
There's an innate democracy about scandal. It's bad for a few, but sport for the many. Throughout the Watergate era, Mark Russell was licking his chops. So much was revealed and discussed daily that Russell was able to perform two completely different shows nightly at Washington's Shoreham Hotel, where he held forth as comedian-with-portfolio for 20 years, beginning in 1961.
TRAVEL
February 7, 1993 | EILEEN OGINTZ
"It's impossible. The soldiers couldn't have done it that fast," Matt declared, shaking his head. My son Matt and daughter Reggie tried to simulate the way the Civil War soldiers reloaded and fired their cannons during the Battle of Gettysburg, by following our battlefield guide's instructions. The soldiers fired three times a minute but despite their best efforts, Matt and Reggie couldn't come close. Yet this wasn't a lesson in firearms.
MAGAZINE
June 27, 2004 | Mark Rozzo, Mark Rozzo is a freelance writer based in Brooklyn, N.Y., and a regular contributor to The Times' Book Review.
Sitting at the dining-room table of his Silver Lake home, 2,300 miles from the hallowed battlefield where part of his father's legacy is under siege, Los Angeles architect Dion Neutra, still sprightly at 77, allows his voice to escalate in mild exasperation. "There should be a national will to save these buildings," he says. "It shouldn't have to be a one-man crusade." Silence--punctuated by birdsong--fills the home he helped build with his famous father, the late Richard Neutra, in 1950.
TRAVEL
October 1, 2000 | JAMES T. YENCKEL, James T. Yenckel is a veteran travel writer based in Washington, D.C
A humble plank-wood farmhouse stands quietly now on Cemetery Hill, separated by time from the horrors of war that once engulfed i t. It was the home of Abraham Brian, a free black man, and his family, who fled as the Confederate army approached in that steamy summer of 1863.
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