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NEWS
May 7, 1986 | From Reuters
A damaged U.S. nuclear-powered submarine, which limped into Gibraltar last week, left the British base Monday night, military sources said Tuesday. They would not say where the submarine, believed to have suffered damage to a fuel tank and sonar device, was bound.
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TRAVEL
December 22, 2013 | By Catherine Watson
MÁLAGA, Spain - When I was 8 years old, I wanted to run away to sea and be a cabin boy on a clipper ship. Sixty years later - gender, age and vocation notwithstanding - I finally got the chance. As I packed to meet the Star Flyer on the southern coast of Spain in October, my one worry was whether this modern clipper would live up to my childhood dreams. Live up to? Oh, my. It trumped them all, starting at the moment I saw it. The Flyer was tied up at a palm-shaded pier in Málaga - long, slim white hull; four tall masts gleaming in late-day sun; sails furled and waiting.
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WORLD
September 20, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Spain and Britain have reached a deal to resolve side issues stemming from their 300-year-old dispute over Gibraltar but sidestepped the main one -- their claims to sovereignty over the Rock at Spain's southern tip. A key aspect in the accord will open Gibraltar to commercial flights from Spain and the rest of Europe. An Anglo-Dutch fleet captured Gibraltar in 1704, and Spain ceded sovereignty to Britain in 1713 but has persistently sought its return.
WORLD
August 12, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON-- In an escalating spat with Spain over Gibraltar, the tiny British-ruled promontory at the tip of the Iberian peninsula, Britain is considering legal action to confirm its sovereignty over the territory known as The Rock. A spokesman for Prime Minister David Cameron told reporters Monday that the British leader was disappointed following talks last week with his Spanish counterpart, Mariano Rajoy, and diplomatic exchanges between the two countries' foreign ministers. According to reports of the daily briefing to parliamentary correspondents, Cameron was “disappointed by the failure of the Spanish to remove the additional border checks this weekend, and we are now considering what legal action is open to us. This would be an unprecedented step; we want to consider it carefully before making a decision to pursue.” The row has resuscitated long-standing rancor over what many Spaniards see as a vestige of colonialism, though British sovereignty was recognized by the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht.
NEWS
March 27, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
The remains of Capt. Thomas Norman, Royal Marines, who was fatally wounded in the epic battle off Trafalgar in 1805, lie in a tiny cemetery at the foot of Main Street. Nearby, the Barbary Ape Take Away advertises fast food: breaded haddock and Spanish omelets. The apes themselves still gambol, under government subsidy, on the limestone cliffs thrusting, defiantly British, out of the blue Mediterranean Sea. Gibraltar's fortress image lingers, but the Rock is shifting.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher today ruled out the return of Gibraltar to Spain unless the colony agrees. Answering a question in Parliament following an appeal before the body from Spanish King Juan Carlos on Wednesday, Thatcher said Britain was well aware of Spain's view that the tiny Mediterranean colony should be returned to Spanish sovereignty but would not change its policy.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1987 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
The 12-nation European Economic Community suffered two major setbacks Tuesday when the heads of government failed to agree on guidelines to bring a $6-billion budget deficit under control and a major civil aviation agreement fell apart because Spain objected to including Britain's airport at Gibraltar. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was the lone holdout at the end of two days of intensive--sometimes acrimonious--budget talks at the semiannual summit meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1994
The difference between Sen. Bob Dole and the Rock of Gibraltar is that the rock gives a little. YALE BUDIN Beverly Hills
NEWS
January 31, 1989
Britain confirmed that it will withdraw some troops from Gibraltar but denied it is abandoning the strategic area. Defense Secretary George Younger said the move is part of a cost-cutting drive and that the troops are needed elsewhere. He said Britain's commitment to the colony is "absolute and very clear. As long as the people of Gibraltar wish it, they will remain under the British flag." Government sources said that about 650 soldiers will be pulled out over two years' time.
WORLD
November 8, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Gibraltarians overwhelmingly rejected a British-Spanish plan to share sovereignty of the colony, dealing a setback to London and Madrid's attempts to heal a centuries-old dispute. Nearly 99% of those who voted opposed the idea of Britain giving Spain a share of sovereignty over its colony attached to Spain's southern coast. Gibraltar's chief minister, Peter Caruana, called the referendum after Britain indicated it was in favor of sharing sovereignty.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2013
A worldwide travel alert issued Aug. 2 by the U.S. State Department warns Americans to be alert to "the continued potential for terrorist attacks, particularly in the Middle East and North Africa, and possibly occurring in or emanating from the Arabian Peninsula. " On July 25, the State Department issued a travel warning for Saudi Arabia, telling Americans "to fully consider the risks of traveling" to that country, citing security threats because of terrorist groups, "some affiliated with Al Qaeda, who may target Western interests.
WORLD
August 5, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Spain and Britain are launched into a new battle over Gibraltar following the Spanish foreign minister's threat to impose a hefty border-crossing fee on all vehicles entering or leaving the iconic British promontory at Spain's southern tip. The two European Union member states have engaged in wars of words and tit-for-tat provocations for decades. Spain claims as its own the territory affectionately known as "The Rock," despite the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht that recognizes British sovereignty.
SPORTS
June 27, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
Actually thought it couldn't get any worse did you? Silly. Snowballs pick up size and speed heading downhill, and right now the Dodgers are falling like Gibraltar is tied to their ankles. It's not bad enough that the Dodgers are in freefall in the National League West and can't hit Dee Gordon's weight. Now they are a team without a star position player. Because now Andre Ethier is out, and he figures to be for awhile. Ethier somehow strained his left oblique in the first inning Wednesday in San Francisco, left the game and will likely be placed on the disabled list Thursday.
NEWS
April 22, 2007 | Daniel Woolls, Associated Press
Engineers have dreamt of it for a quarter-century: linking Europe and Africa across a strip of choppy water where the Atlantic flows into the Mediterranean. Now, after seemingly endless studies that turned up more than one nasty geological surprise, a project for a high-speed rail tunnel connecting the two very different continents is gathering momentum, raising the prospect of an engineering marvel on par with the Panama Canal or the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France.
NEWS
October 22, 2006 | Mar Roman, Associated Press Writer
As vacationing Europeans were baking on their southern beaches in August, Said Maarouf and a companion boarded a jet ski on the African side of the Strait of Gibraltar. They were dreaming of a new life in Spain, just half an hour away across the choppy water. He came back to his Moroccan hometown in a coffin. Mohammed, his friend and fellow migrant, is still missing at sea. A third man on the jet ski, an immigrant smuggler acting as their guide, also has disappeared.
WORLD
September 20, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Spain and Britain have reached a deal to resolve side issues stemming from their 300-year-old dispute over Gibraltar but sidestepped the main one -- their claims to sovereignty over the Rock at Spain's southern tip. A key aspect in the accord will open Gibraltar to commercial flights from Spain and the rest of Europe. An Anglo-Dutch fleet captured Gibraltar in 1704, and Spain ceded sovereignty to Britain in 1713 but has persistently sought its return.
NEWS
April 29, 1988 | Reuters
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher today attacked a televised documentary that suggested three unarmed Irish guerrillas, killed by British soldiers in Gibraltar last month, were shot in cold blood. Thatcher stepped into a growing controversy over the documentary, which was shown by commercial network Thames Television on Thursday despite a government plea for it to be postponed until after a Gibraltar inquest is held. "The place to have trials is a court of law.
SCIENCE
April 30, 2005 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Scientists have used DNA to figure out the origin of Gibraltar's Barbary macaques, which may have played a small part in winning World War II. The macaques have long been figures of Gibraltar lore. As the story goes, when they are gone, the disputed British colony will return to Spanish rule. In 1942, a handful of the monkeys remained. Gibraltar was militarily important, and any jolt to morale had to be avoided.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Federal authorities said Friday that more than 100 terrorist attacks planned against the United States and its allies have been thwarted since Sept. 11, 2001, due in large part to the continuing interrogation of enemy combatants and other captives ensnared in the war on terrorism. Although authorities would not officially disclose the nature of the planned attacks, government sources said they included threats against American embassies on three continents, a U.S.
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