Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGift Books
IN THE NEWS

Gift Books

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to gift books, I find myself drawn to some unorthodox choices this year. At the head of my list is Joe Sacco's "The Great War" (W.W. Norton, boxed, $35): a single panoramic drawing - 24 feet long, and accordion-folded in a slipcase - that portrays, in graphic intensity, one of the bloodiest events of the 20th century, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. And yet, in its ingenuity, its beauty and (yes) its tactile engagement, it stirs us in a variety of dimensions: the book as objet d'art . This is the secret story of the digital era, that computer production has opened the possibilities of what books are and how we connect with them, not only on screen but also on the page.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
These wine books are sure to fit someone on your list, from the aspiring sommelier to the merely curious . To wrap and put under the tree: a couple of serious reference works, a wine atlas that can also be purchased as an eBook, a guide to newly fashionable sherry and a couple of good reads. The most novel, though, is a Scratch & Sniff introduction to wine from a master sommelier who knows his stuff.  "The Essential Scratch & Sniff Guide to Becoming a Wine Expert" by Richard Betts (Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $19.99)
Advertisement
BOOKS
November 24, 1985 | CHARLES SOLOMON, Solomon's apartment overflows with the research for this article
This has not been a vintage year for gift books. The lavish volumes in the $75 to $125 range that have been a staple of the holiday trade for the last several years have largely been replaced by more modest offerings. Perhaps the publishers of America are cashing in on a marketing trend by offering the gift book lite (everything you've wanted to read about a subject--and less). Or perhaps they're just tired of seeing so many of their Christmas releases on discount tables before Easter.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to gift books, I find myself drawn to some unorthodox choices this year. At the head of my list is Joe Sacco's "The Great War" (W.W. Norton, boxed, $35): a single panoramic drawing - 24 feet long, and accordion-folded in a slipcase - that portrays, in graphic intensity, one of the bloodiest events of the 20th century, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. And yet, in its ingenuity, its beauty and (yes) its tactile engagement, it stirs us in a variety of dimensions: the book as objet d'art . This is the secret story of the digital era, that computer production has opened the possibilities of what books are and how we connect with them, not only on screen but also on the page.
BOOKS
December 5, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, Christopher Reynolds is The Times Travel Writer
The most interesting journeys not only yield up destinations but deliver us into the feeling that we are not only worldlier but wiser. The ambition of most coffee table books--stationery approximates of travel that they are--seems to be the same, but with the order reversed. Of course they're supposed to make us wiser, but all that money spent on four-color reproductions and Hong Kong bindings is probably wasted if we don't come away feeling like we've been somewhere .
BOOKS
November 26, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
On every holiday shopping list there's an Uncle Max, curmudgeonly and impossible to please. This year, try expressing your affection for him with THE PESSIMIST'S JOURNAL (Little, Brown: $9.95), a handy daybook with such cheerless entries as: "Oct. 2: Stores are now decorated for The Holidays, and they've turned that music on."
BOOKS
December 5, 1993 | DEREK SHEARER, Shearer is Director of the International & Public Affairs Center at Occidental College, and a professor of Public Policy. He was an economics advisor to Bill Clinton in the 1992 Presidential campaign, and served briefly as Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce
During the 1992 Presidential campaign, candidate Bill Clinton's battered leather briefcase always bulged with books. As a policy advisor and friend, I frequently added to the briefcase's weight by giving Clinton books on economics and public policy. I also brought on the campaign plane mysteries to read for relaxation, and Clinton would always grab them. Eventually, my sharing of books with Clinton was noticed by the press--and I was dubbed, "the bookmobile."
BOOKS
December 5, 1993 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, Huneven is a frequent contributor to Book Review
This season's books of a religious nature together form a curious assortment of guides to that eternal and boundless realm, the religious imagination. From East and West, on heaven and hell, some fit for coffee tables, others for pockets, these tomes seem intent on revealing how our next-door neighbors and enemies, our ancestors and other predecessors visualize and articulate our mutual theological fascinations. THE LIFE OF THE BUDDHA by Patricia Herbert ( Pomegranate Art Books: $25; 96 pp.
BOOKS
December 6, 1987 | IRINA AVERKIEFF
The popularity of books as gift items has not lessened the fundamental burden of the bestower: The choice should reflect intelligence, sensitivity and cultural awareness as well as the ability to psychologically assess and flatter the recipient. Books become personal statements when they become gifts. Books with lots of photographs inspire less paranoia in both the giver and the recipient than those containing mostly text.
BOOKS
December 18, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON, A frequent contributor to Book Review, Solomon reads the gift books stacked all over his Santa Monica apartment
Choosing gift books must pose as grave a problem for Santa as it does for holiday shoppers. It's not hard to find something for people who've been naughty--not with all those copies of "Prime Time" on the shelves. But finding the right book for someone who's been nice may require checking the list (and the stores) twice or more. Anyone who liked the film "Never Cry Wolf" would appreciate The Arctic Wolf: Living With the Pack by L. David Mech (Voyageur: $24.95 until Dec. 31, $27.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2009 | Alex Pham
Will digital books catch fire this holiday? According to an online survey, 1 in 5 shoppers said they planned to buy an electronic book reader such as a Sony Reader or Amazon Kindle this year. When asked what they would like to get as a gift, about 1 in 10 cited a digital book reader. Portable music players, once the hot holiday ticket, got just 3.4% of the vote, while game consoles came in at 6%, according to the survey commissioned by Retrevo, a gadget review website. Likely buyers tend to be men under 35 years old who are living in the Northeast, where more people use public transportation, with an average annual household income of more than $100,000, according to the survey of 771 respondents.
FOOD
December 19, 2007 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
WALK into the cookbook section of a good bookstore these days and it's what you don't see that's the biggest gift of the season. Instead of the miles of aisles of Food Network-packaged slickness, the interchangeable Paula/Rachael/Giadas that have been so inescapable all year, there are small piles of serious recipe collections from serious cooks. And some big piles, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Holiday gift books run the gamut for TV lovers (a guide to the world of "Ally McBeal"), art aficionados (a new biography on Diego Rivera) and film fans (a personal look at the life of Gary Cooper by his daughter). Television "ALLY McBEAL: THE OFFICIAL GUIDE," by Tim Appelo, HarperEntertainment ($18.
BOOKS
September 12, 1999 | JANIE JARVIS and RICHARD JARVIS, Janie and Richard Jarvis are the authors of "The Magic Bookshelf: A Parent's Guide to Showing Growing Minds the Path to the Best Children's Literature," from which this series is adapted. "The Magic Bookshelf" can be ordered by calling Books America at (800) 929-7889
Editor's Note: As part of the Times' Reading by 9 initiative, Book Review is publishing a monthly series on how parents can introduce kids to the best children's literature. * Ask children how they choose a book, and they will tell you, not surprisingly, by the cover. Children are attracted to flashy, colorful objects, and books are no exception. Parents of children who read picture books know this first hand; attractive art can lure a child to a well-conceived, well-written picture book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER and HOPE HAMASHIGE
Two dozen Whittier Elementary School students went on a shopping spree recently and spent $500 on new books for the library. The money was a gift from Helen Feinberg, whose husband, Charles, was a volunteer at the school on the west side of Costa Mesa. The books will be added to the library's collection, known as the Charles Feinberg collection, which was established by the Feinberg family.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1996 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No sooner are the Thanksgiving leftovers wrapped in foil than we start planning and shopping for the children-centered holidays of Hanukkah and Christmas. At this gift-giving season, may I respectfully suggest that books be high on the list. Yes, I can still recall my childhood delight at receiving a pair of red slippers trimmed with white fur at Christmas. But the greatest joy was getting books because it meant my parents would have to read to me.
BOOKS
December 19, 1993 | GEORGIA JONES-DAVIS, Georgia Jones-Davis is an assistant book editor
People lost more than houses in the great Laguna and Malibu fires. If they escaped with their lives and animals, they are no doubt grateful. But it is no small thing to loose "everything"--especially the furnishings of your spiritual and emotional life--a journal, treasures brought home from travels, a dead nephew's favorite toy, photographs. Material objects are sometimes a silver thread, the only link, connecting us to the most spiritual or emotional experience of our lives.
BOOKS
December 19, 1993 | ELAINE KENDALL
Flourishing behind towering hedges, revealed only at the end of winding private drives, Montecito's most spectacular gardens were virtually invisible until the publication of MONTECITO GARDENS: California's Garden Paradise by Elizabeth E. Vogt, Steve Eltinge, Mario E. Quintana. (M.I.P. Publishing: $50; 274 pp.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|