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Gifted Children

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OPINION
December 14, 1986
As directors of a school for gifted children, we were appalled by Garry Trudeau's Doonesbury comic strip (Nov. 30). Mother and child seemed quite dismayed that he has tested in the gifted range and the child pleads that they not send him to "nerd school." All Trudeau succeeds in doing is reinforcing the damaging stereotypes that have stigmatized gifted children for many years. These children are indeed not "nerds." They are similar to other children in so many respects, but have this one dimension that needs to be nurtured--for their sakes as well as society as a whole.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2011
Hans Joachim Tiedge West German spy defected to East Germany Hans Joachim Tiedge, 73, a top West German counterintelligence officer who defected to East Germany in 1985, died April 6 at his home near Moscow, according to his German publisher. Tiedge, a Berlin native, led the hunt for East German spies for 19 years from a Cologne office and remained at his post even after his superiors became aware of his increasingly serious drinking problem and mounting debts. Heribert Hellenbroich, the head of West Germany's domestic intelligence agency, was fired shortly after the defection for keeping Tiedge on the job. Tiedge left East Germany for the Soviet Union in 1990, less than two months before German reunification.
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NEWS
December 14, 1986
A memorial service will be held Dec. 27 for John Curtis Gowan, an early authority on gifted children and a member of the founding faculty at California State University, Northridge. Gowan was 74 when he died Dec. 2 in a Woodland Hills hospital after brain surgery. A Cal State Northridge spokesman said Gowan, who lived in Westlake, became interested in gifted children after the Russians gained superiority in space with the 1957 launch of Sputnik. He formed the National Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010
Alberic the Wise And Other Journeys Norton Juster, illustrated by Domenico Gnoli Random House/Yearling, $5.99, ages 8-12 Idiosyncratic tales of adventure in mythic lands from the author of "The Phantom Tollbooth," with lots of curious ideas to chew over. Bats at the Ballgame Brian Lies Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $16.99, ages 3-7 When night falls, bats go to the ballpark ? and they're quite versed in baseball esoterica.
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overwhelmed by the endless books packing the stacks of UC Irvine's library, Amy Locklear didn't know where to begin. A teacher suggested that she look up her Native American tribe, the Lumbee. The 13-year-old North Carolina girl was doubtful, but agreed to check. To her amazement--and teacher Jaymee Kjelland's secret delight--Amy found three books on her little known tribe, which was not officially recognized by Congress until 1956.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1987 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
A bare majority of a bitterly divided San Diego city school board decided Tuesday to restore $230,000 to its gifted children program, which serves 10% of the district's 116,000 students. The vote on the Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) program came despite warnings from two board members that supporters of numerous other educational programs that were cut or eliminated during last spring will be justifiably angry with the board.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1993 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Orange County Chamber Orchestra closed its 10th season Thursday with a concert that revolved around the phenomenon of the child prodigy. The program, titled "Magical Mozart" and given in the Irvine Barclay Theatre, consisted of four works, arguably by the most formidable precocious talent in Western music history, and featured soloists who had been--or are--unusually gifted children. Mozart wrote three of the selections as a teen-ager and produced the fourth, "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik," K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city school board is expected to decide tonight whether to stop testing the district's youngest students to identify those who are especially talented. The proposal to end testing in kindergarten, and possibly in first grade, has raised a furor among parents who support programs for gifted and talented children in the 6,200-student Huntington Beach City School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1997
* Re "Trustees to Discuss Halting Early Exams to Identify Gifted Children," Nov. 18: Why are parents in such a hurry these days? My own children were in gifted programs. I've also taught gifted children for 30 years. And I still believe that we can wait until second or third grade to place our children in a gifted program. Gifted children are also children who are maturing emotionally and physically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE and LORI HAYCOX and DEBRA CANO
Marge Hoctor of the Garden Grove Unified School District has been chosen as president-elect of the California Assn. for the Gifted. Hoctor, the school district's coordinator for K-12 programs, will serve as the association's vice president until July 1997, when she will assume the duties of president. Hoctor, who joined the district in 1970, has worked extensively with gifted children. She taught in the Gifted and Talented Education Program for two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Despite efforts to portray it as an art for the aging, classical music has always been a young person's game. No other form of art or entertainment requires such early training. Kids often learn Bach on the piano long before they get around to mimicking Jimi Hendrix on the guitar. Prodigies, in fact, are classical's business model.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | Debora Vrana, Special to The Times
Being raised to be exceptional can cause exceptional problems; Alissa Quart should know. The 34-year-old author of a new book "Hothouse Kids: The Dilemma of the Gifted Child," Quart read at age 3 and wrote her first novel when she was 7. In her book, she argues that today's parents' need to enrich children with special classes, jammed-packed schedules and learning tools can leave a lasting legacy. And not one the parents had in mind.
HEALTH
September 4, 2006 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Two weeks ago, Kerry and Lee Schmelzer left their Montana dream home and relocated to a rental in Reno. Pulling up stakes wasn't easy, but, they ultimately decided, it had to be done. Their 13-year-old daughter, Emma, needed a new school. For years, the Schmelzers had struggled to challenge Emma academically at their local public schools. Although some years were better than others, they believed Emma wasn't getting what she needed. "She learned a lot of things," says her mom, Kerry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2003 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
Seven-year-old Nicholas Green was killed by bandits nearly a decade ago in Italy, but his spirit lives on in another little boy's heart, a woman's eyes and hundreds of gifted U.S. schoolchildren who have won awards bearing his name. Now Nicholas' legacy has touched Orange County, where Laguna Niguel fourth-grader Magdalena Chau is the most recent winner of the Nicholas Green Distinguished Student Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001 | JOHN CLARK
In the upcoming "Royal Tenenbaums," Royal (Gene Hackman) and Etheline (Anjelica Huston) Tenenbaum preside over a brood of prodigies who grow up to be losers. Richie (Luke Wilson), a junior tennis champion, inexplicably breaks down in the middle of a big match and retires from the game. His sister, Margot (Gwyneth Paltrow), who received a $50,000 playwriting grant while in the ninth grade, now sits in a bathtub and paints her toenails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a cascade of donations, UC Irvine's summer program for gifted students has enough money to take all the children who were accepted but could not afford to go. What's more, the program probably will have enough money for all its scholarship students next year and the year after that. Just three weeks ago, officials from UC Irvine were telling 88 children and their teachers that there would be no financial aid this year because of a drop in corporate donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1991 | MARY LAINE YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Laine Yarber teaches English and journalism at an area high school. Her column appears occasionally in The Times
Some parents have asked me how they can tell whether their children are academically gifted. The short answer is that there is no simple way--there is no foolproof checklist that will enable you to judge your son or daughter. The process by which public schools determine which children are gifted is, in fact, a rather complex and somewhat subjective one. Gone are the days in which a single IQ test was administered to every child and those who scored above a certain number were deemed gifted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scores of donors offering thousands of dollars came forward Thursday so that gifted but impoverished kids could attend a UC Irvine summer program that had lost its scholarship money. Leonard Nimoy, famous for his role as Mr. Spock on the "Star Trek" television show, and his wife, Susan, pledged $10,000 and urged other foundations and donors to match that amount.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine will still hold its programs for gifted middle-school students this summer, but the seven students from Daniel Chen's class in Buena Park--along with close to 100 other bright, hard-working but poor kids--probably won't be there. For the first time in nearly a decade, UC Irvine's program received no corporate sponsorships this year, and will not be able to offer poor students scholarships, said program director Darlene Boyd.
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