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Gifted Students

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996 | MIGUEL HELFT
Bright Ojai students could begin attending classes at a special magnet school for the gifted by next fall. A group called the Parents Alliance for Magnet Education has proposed a voluntary program in which students in the top 12% of their class would attend full-time classes at a special school site. "We proposed a pilot program with a combined third and fourth, and fifth and sixth grades," said Chris Westphal, a member of the alliance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
San Diego State University is getting a $20-million donation -- the largest single gift in the school's history -- to create several endowed student scholarships, officials announced Wednesday. The gift comes from San Diego developer and philanthropist Conrad Prebys. In recognition, the university's new student union will be named the Conrad Prebys Aztec Student Union. The donation will support at least 150 scholarships annually for student veterans, those pursuing biomedical research and creative and performing arts, former foster youth, entrepreneurs, student government leaders and honors students.
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NEWS
November 5, 1993 | From The Washington Post
Hundreds of thousands of bright American students sit bored in classes where the teacher rehashes lessons they already know, according to the first Education Department study on gifted children in two decades. As a result of not being forced to work hard, America's best students fare poorly against the best students in other countries. Education Secretary Richard W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
It's not easy to go up against the College Board, the powerful administrator of the SAT. But that's exactly what Elizabeth Stone did — and she won. In April, the San Mateo independent college counselor learned about a partnership between the company and a summer institute for gifted students. For $4,500, the students in the program would spend three weeks in a dorm at Amherst College in Massachusetts, take challenging courses and meet like-minded students from around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1997
At 5 our son, Alex, demanded to be taught about percentages so he could better understand the Times Business section. Due to stories such as the ones presented in "Struggling to Teach the Very Brightest" (Oct. 17), we avoided L.A. Unified and used a private school. We quickly learned that for Alex, school was for day care, social interaction and play. Academics for our son happened in the evenings and on weekends. After the birth of our daughter, Melissa (who is also unusually bright)
OPINION
May 15, 2010
Too good to ignore Re "L.A. schools seek — and find — gifted students," May 9 How many times must we learn that if the bar is set high, students will strive to reach it? The late Jaime Escalante showed this country that students from East L.A. could pass the AP math exam. Yet we still let minority students in the poor areas of L.A. go unchallenged. When students are bored, they will find something to do, and it usually involves trouble of some kind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1994 | MAIA DAVIS
Ventura County parents of gifted students who want tips on how to nurture their children's intelligence will be able to attend a March 19 conference in Ventura. And they can bring their children too. In addition to featuring separate meetings for parents and teachers of gifted children, the conference, which is sponsored by state and local associations for the gifted, will include workshops for the students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Danny Hidalgo and Philip Lee usually spend their weekdays at the Los Angeles Zoo, up to their elbows in science experiments for their North Hollywood High School Zoo Magnet program. But the two highly gifted students exchanged their lab coats for business attire recently when they attended the National Young Leaders Conference in Washington, D.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Second-grader Emariye Louden would debate just about anything with his mother from the time he could talk. At 4, he knew his letters, spelled his name and memorized birthdays and phone numbers. His mother figured he was smart, but odds are that until recently no one at his school would have singled him out for special attention. Few students were being recognized as academically gifted at 99th Street Elementary in South Los Angeles, a common scenario at campuses that enroll low-income minority students in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | JILL LEOVY
Parents of children who attend a highly gifted magnet program at San Jose Street Elementary School are mounting a protest against next year's shifting of San Jose's sixth-graders to Portola Junior High School, part of a districtwide reconfiguration. The parents say the shift, which is expected to reduce the small magnet program's enrollment by more than half, will weaken the program, make it more vulnerable to cutbacks, and increase pressure to admit students with lower levels of aptitude.
OPINION
May 15, 2010
Too good to ignore Re "L.A. schools seek — and find — gifted students," May 9 How many times must we learn that if the bar is set high, students will strive to reach it? The late Jaime Escalante showed this country that students from East L.A. could pass the AP math exam. Yet we still let minority students in the poor areas of L.A. go unchallenged. When students are bored, they will find something to do, and it usually involves trouble of some kind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Second-grader Emariye Louden would debate just about anything with his mother from the time he could talk. At 4, he knew his letters, spelled his name and memorized birthdays and phone numbers. His mother figured he was smart, but odds are that until recently no one at his school would have singled him out for special attention. Few students were being recognized as academically gifted at 99th Street Elementary in South Los Angeles, a common scenario at campuses that enroll low-income minority students in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
OPINION
May 15, 2008
Re "Are gifted students getting left out?" May 12 Sadly, this article is right on the mark. Why the pervasive problem? Without allocation of sufficient resources at the national, state and local levels, the needs of gifted students will continue to go unmet, especially those students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. I hope this article serves as a wake-up call to policymakers at all levels and spurs an investment in gifted education. While No Child Left Behind has focused attention on remedial reading and math, our nation has failed to develop the much-needed talent of our brightest students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
If you reviewed Dalton Sargent's report cards, you'd know only half his story. The 15-year-old Altadena junior has lousy grades in many subjects. He has blown off assignments and been dissatisfied with many of his teachers. It would be accurate to call him a problematic student. But he is also gifted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2007 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
As an alpha nerd, Harper Robertson naturally thinks her high school is kickwump -- a word her class coined. She wouldn't be prouder if it had the top-ranked football team on planet Earth, which it most decidedly doesn't and never will. "I knew I was going to a nerdy high school when I realized that the only elective was Java programming," she said. If you could set foot on Harper's campus -- you can't -- you'd see what she loves about it.
OPINION
March 28, 2007
CREDIT THE No Child Left Behind Act for this: It helped to reveal how little learning was going on in many classrooms, especially those with poor and minority students. As a result, educators are working to change that. This is no small accomplishment. Still, the law has not yet achieved its key goals: improvement in student scores and a narrowing of the achievement gap between white, middle-class children and their poor, minority counterparts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2007 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
U.S. immigration officials announced Friday that they would drop efforts to deport the illegal immigrant parents of an academically gifted American child, ending a nine-year battle over whether exceptional educational needs can avert deportation. Benjamin and Londy Cabrera, who illegally emigrated from Mexico and Guatemala, respectively, in the 1980s, argued that deportation would cause "exceptional and extremely unusual hardship" to their two American daughters, both Los Angeles natives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2006 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
Finding the perfect gift to express the holiday spirit is never easy, but students and their parents have been known to bestow on favorite teachers tokens both weird and lavish. They have included the practical -- homemade bread, body lotions and pricey gift certificates; the eclectic -- handmade noodles from a father who owns a noodle factory and custom-made CDs recorded at one family's home; and the plain eccentric -- a ceramic urn engraved with the phrase "teacher's ashes."
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