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Gilbert Hyatt

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BUSINESS
October 21, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1968, much of the world was in turmoil. Thousands died in the bloody Tet offensive in Vietnam. Russian tanks rumbled into Czechoslovakia. Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. fell to assassin's bullets. Police clashed with demonstrators in Chicago. But Gilbert P. Hyatt distanced himself from the turbulence. He was not interested in politics or protests.
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BUSINESS
June 2, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ex-wife of the inventor of the microprocessor, which revolutionized the computer industry two decades ago, lost a bid Tuesday to renegotiate her 1975 divorce settlement to give her a share of the former Orange County man's nearly $90 million in newfound royalty payments. A Los Angeles Superior Court judge dismissed a motion filed in January by Priscilla Maystead of Chatsworth, who sought to reopen the terms of her divorce from Gilbert P. Hyatt.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Hyatt, who is belatedly gaining recognition as the inventor of the microprocessor, said Monday that he has signed patent-license agreements with six major Japanese electronics manufacturers, including NEC, Sharp and Sony. Hyatt declined to identify three other Japanese firms that he said have signed licensing agreements for several of his patents, including a 1990 patent for the invention of the computer on a chip--or the microprocessor.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For inventor Gilbert P. Hyatt, the future of personal computer technology lies in computer graphics. Hyatt, who was awarded a patent in 1990, decades after he invented the first microprocessor--or computer on a chip--in the 1960s, said he is now working to improve computer graphics and display technology to make computers easier and more compelling to use. Hyatt found a receptive audience Monday at the National Computer Graphics Assn.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's startling news that a previously unknown La Palma engineer was awarded a broad U.S. patent for microprocessor technology has reopened the question of who actually invented the "computer on a chip"--arguably one of the most important devices created in decades. The answer, on which a market valued last year at $7 billion potentially hinges, won't be easy and won't come quickly, patent attorneys, semiconductor company officials and market analysts said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1968, much of the world was in turmoil. Thousands died in the Tet offensive in Vietnam. Russian tanks rumbled into Czechoslovakia. Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. fell to assassins' bullets. Police clashed with demonstrators in Chicago. But Gilbert P. Hyatt distanced himself from the turbulence. The 30-year-old electrical engineer was absorbed with another matter: Designing a computer to fit on a silicon microchip no bigger than a fingernail.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reversal of a decision last July, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has decided to review whether a controversial patent that credited a La Palma engineer with inventing the computer on a chip should instead be granted to a former Texas Instruments engineer. The agency proceeding, officially known as an interference, will focus on who was the first to invent the computer on a chip, the brain of all electronic equipment from microwave ovens to pocket calculators.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Hyatt, the La Palma inventor who last July won a 20-year legal battle to be recognized as the inventor of the computer on a chip, is now facing litigation from another front: his brother. Michael A. Hyatt, a 50-year-old Cerritos resident, is suing his older brother, Gilbert, for allegedly failing to turn over property that belongs to him. Like his brother, Michael Hyatt also has achieved some degree of fame. In 1986, the former engineer for Northrop Corp.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chip Inventor Signs Accords: Gilbert P. Hyatt, the La Palma inventor who is gaining recognition as the inventor of the microprocessor widely used in computers and other electronics products, said he has signed patent-license agreements with six major Japanese electronics manufacturers, including NEC, Sharp and Sony. Hyatt declined to identify three of the Japanese companies or to provide financial details of the license agreements.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chip Inventor Signs Accords: Gilbert P. Hyatt, the La Palma inventor who is gaining recognition as the inventor of the microprocessor widely used in computers and other electronics products, said he has signed patent-license agreements with six major Japanese electronics manufacturers, including NEC, Sharp and Sony. Hyatt declined to identify three of the Japanese companies or to provide financial details of the license agreements.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Hyatt, who is belatedly gaining recognition as the inventor of the microprocessor, said Monday that he has signed patent-license agreements with six major Japanese electronics manufacturers, including NEC, Sharp and Sony. Hyatt declined to identify three other Japanese firms that he said have signed licensing agreements for several of his patents, including a 1990 patent for the invention of the computer on a chip--or the microprocessor.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1992 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Some products from major Japanese consumer electronics companies soon will include documentation paying homage to a set of patents belonging to Gilbert P. Hyatt, the La Palma inventor who is now getting recognition for work he performed two decades ago.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Hyatt, the reclusive La Palma inventor who won a 20-year legal fight in 1990 for a patent to prove that he invented the microprocessor that spawned the computer revolution, has signed his first patent license agreement with a major electronics company. The agreement with a U.S. unit of Philips N.V. is significant because the Dutch electronics giant is the first company to acknowledge the validity of Hyatt's patent by agreeing to pay him for the rights to use his inventions.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Trademark Office, reversing a decision last July, has decided to review whether a controversial patent awarded to La Palma inventor Gilbert P. Hyatt should instead be granted to a former Texas Instruments engineer. The proceeding, known in official jargon as an interference, will focus on who was first to invent the computer-on-a-chip--the brain of all electronic equipment from microwave ovens to pocket calculators.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert Hyatt, the lone La Palma inventor who emerged from obscurity in August with an apparently far-reaching patent on the microprocessor, said Wednesday that Intel and Motorola had decided not to contest that patent claim. As a result, Hyatt could be entitled to millions of dollars in license payments.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reversal of a decision last July, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has decided to review whether a controversial patent that credited a La Palma engineer with inventing the computer on a chip should instead be granted to a former Texas Instruments engineer. The agency proceeding, officially known as an interference, will focus on who was the first to invent the computer on a chip, the brain of all electronic equipment from microwave ovens to pocket calculators.
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