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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
"He won't get far on hot air and fantasy," sniffs The Right Ordinary Horatio Jackson in the upcoming movie "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen." Horatio Jackson, a symbol of the chilling winds of reason and rationality blowing into the 18th Century, was deriding his fantastical, whimsical nemesis--the Baron von Munchausen. He could just as well have been echoing Terry Gilliam's modern-day detractors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
"He won't get far on hot air and fantasy," sniffs The Right Ordinary Horatio Jackson in the upcoming movie "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen." Horatio Jackson, a symbol of the chilling winds of reason and rationality blowing into the 18th Century, was deriding his fantastical, whimsical nemesis--the Baron von Munchausen. He could just as well have been echoing Terry Gilliam's modern-day detractors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2006
Editor's note: It will be welcome news to devotees of "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" -- the 1975 movie inspired "Spamalot," the Tony-winning musical -- that the distributor struck a new print and restored 24 seconds that were snipped prior to its original release. What follows is a condensed version of a review by Kevin Thomas that was published June 15, 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By David Ng
Monty Python's big reunion has sold out in less than a minute, leading the British comedy troupe to add four performances to its July engagement at the O2 Arena in London. On Monday, Eric Idle tweeted that the July 1 performance sold out in 45 seconds. He wrote that the four additional performances -- July 2 to 5 -- also sold out in less than a minute. "This pretty much took us by surprise, so we are talking about adding more shows. I apologise if you didn't get seats. We're working on it," Idle tweeted.
SPORTS
March 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Before Thursday night's game against the New York Knicks, Houston center Akeem Olajuwon criticized Coach Bill Fitch's coaching tactics and accused guard Sleepy Floyd of not fulfilling his duties as a playmaker. The Rockets then went out and defeated the Knicks, 134-117, at Houston. Purvis Short scored 33 points, tying his season high. The 134 points is a team high for the Rockets this season. The game met with Olajuwon's approval. "That's what I was talking about before," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To see "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" 26 years after its original release is to appreciate it considerably more than the first time around--especially when an initial look proved to be a turnoff. The inspired lunacy of the famed British comedy troupe's take on King Arthur and his knights' quest for the Holy Grail is more often amusing than hilarious in effect; if there are laugh-out-loud moments, there are also passages that are dry and overly talky.
SPORTS
January 24, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel" Where: HBO, tonight, 10 The lead story is on "Jefferson Street" Joe Gilliam, who, with the Pittsburgh Steelers, in 1974 became the first African American to begin an NFL season as the starting quarterback. The last time television featured Gilliam was four years ago on an NBC Super Bowl pregame show. It showed a beaten man, homeless, unable to beat a drug habit. Gilliam hit rock bottom on national TV.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day; David Ng; Shari Roan
HERO COMPLEX 2 weeks for 2 minutes of movie Early in "Terminator Salvation," Christian Bale as future resistance leader John Connor leads a raid on a Skynet facility, escapes in a helicopter, gets walloped by the force of a nuclear explosion, crash-lands and crawls from the wreckage, only to get attacked by a crawling Terminator. Did we mention this is all in one shot? To achieve this, visual effects supervisor Charles Gibson coordinated two film crews working over multiple locations to compile all the elements of the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2007 | By Eric Idle, Special to The Times
IT'S a dark and crowded theater in New York. The curtain has only been up five minutes, and Steve Wynn, the billionaire owner of the Wynn Las Vegas hotel, leans in, grips my knee and whispers in my ear: "Eric," he says, "this will be great in Las Vegas. " "Yes," I say, "it will. " Then I realize, slightly disappointedly, he means "Spamalot. " My future as a billionaire's date is still up for grabs. "Can I give you a ride home?" he asks nicely. I'm thinking 6th Avenue, but he means L.A. Well, OK. He flies us home in a plane bigger than my boarding school.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994 | Chris Willman, Chris Willman is a regular contributor to Calendar
D eath be not proud seems to be one of the chief themes of the collective canon of Monty Python, the six-man British comedy troupe whose work first began airing on the BBC a quarter-century ago this month. Their TV show was infamous for its litany of dead parrots, sick undertakers and quasi-cannibals; their movies signified by medieval torture and disease, heroes dying on crosses and grim reapers. In Monty Python's world, there are 8 million ways to die--all of them silly.
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