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Gillian Anderson

ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Sunday night, the L.A. Times' 2013 Hero Complex Film Festival closed with a celebratory tribute to "The X-Files," in its 20th-anniversary year. Episodes were shown and "Hero Complex" editor Gina McIntyre interviewed creator Chris Carter, along with Darin Morgan, who wrote for and acted in the show, and his writer-producer brother Glen Morgan. In celebration of this celebration, I wrote an essay , posted Sunday in Hero Complex, on the influential paranormal procedural, its look, its people, and my own preference, as a viewer, for fuzziness over certainty.
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NEWS
April 20, 2001 | ANN O'NEILL
We now can tell you that Gillian Anderson of "The X-Files" was embroiled in her own contract dispute during co-star David Duchovny's highly publicized $25-million legal tiff with Fox. But her camp kept it quiet at the time, for fear of stirring up bad publicity. Now, while Duchovny is appearing in only half the episodes in the show's eighth season, Anderson is locked into a ninth season, even though she's been threatening since 1999 to stroll and focus on film roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
You must remember this: A kiss is just a kiss -- unless, that is, it's a kiss between paranormal investigators Fox Mulder and Dana Scully projected larger than life on the giant screen of the Cinerama Dome. That kiss -- a highlight from "The X-Files" -- became a lightning bolt that sparked squeals of delight from many jammed into the historic theater for a retrospective tribute to the Fox drama, which centered on the adventures of two FBI agents exploring the supernatural and the unexplainable.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1994 | DANIEL HOWARD CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in an industrial district here, the dank interior of a closed-down nightclub has been gutted and refitted with black plastic, chain link and neon lights for an episode of Fox's sexy, surreal TV series, "The X-Files." Detached mannequin limbs protrude from darkened walls to create disturbing images. The seedy, smoke-filled space is supposed to resemble a Hollywood Boulevard nightclub--the hangout for a contemporary coven of grunge vampires.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Fall" (Netflix). After several years of playing peekaboo with her audience, Gillian Anderson, who first won your heart and mind as Agent Dana Scully on "The X-Files," is back with a vengeance (in a nice way). This year saw her return to American television (the homegrown sort) in a recurring role on NBC's "Hannibal"; next year will find her as a regular in the same network's midseason political thriller "Crisis. " At present she may be found starring in this five-episode BBC series (miniseries?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Gillian Anderson returns to American television Sunday night as Wallis Simpson in the "Masterpiece Classic" miniseries "Any Human Heart," based on William Boyd's sweeping novel of one man's life spanning the 20th century. The PBS series, also starring Matthew Macfadyen, Jim Broadbent, Hayley Atwell and Kim Cattrall, runs through Feb. 27. Wallis Simpson seems to be everywhere these days. She's also a character in "The King's Speech," although your portrayal of her in "Any Human Heart" was very different.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2012 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
The trouble with attempting to adapt any novel by Charles Dickens into a three-hour miniseries (a mini miniseries?) is that even the best, cleverest screenwriter will be forced to boil the story down to its essential plot. And though Dickens did not shirk on plot, deliriously crisscrossing fistfuls of them as if each book were an unending game of cat's cradle, action is not what defined his work. God, they say, is in the details, and so is Charles Dickens, in the evocation of place, the palpable rise of mood and, most important, the creation of characters so freighted with eccentricity as to be unbelievable but so finely drawn that they live and breathe nonetheless.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through his acclaimed autobiographical films, most notably "Distant Voices, Still Lives," England's Terence Davies has demonstrated a knack for bringing the past alive to disclose pain and treachery beneath a seductively evocative surface. He proves well-suited to bring to the screen "The House of Mirth," a devastating expose of the cruelty and hypocrisy of high society a century ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Serial killer dramas are strange and guilty pleasures. Whether penned by a master or cranked out by a hack, there is no beauty and little insight to be gained from the story of an actual socio- or psychopath, beyond the obvious horror that such people exist. The brutal men (and once in a great while women) who kill again and again rarely create symbolic tableaux or tantalize with art and anagrams. Jeffrey Dahmer was not an erudite opera lover who invited people to elaborate dinners; John Wayne Gacy did not engage in a psychological minuet with an FBI profiler.
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