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Gillian Welch

ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2003 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
Like many of the blues and folk originators to whom David Johansen paid homage during his concert Saturday at the Getty Center's Harold M. Williams Auditorium, the singer took repeated hits from a bottle kept at hand on a stool next to him. But this was different. Holding a dropper to his mouth, Johansen explained it was St. John's wort -- a botanical extract purported to cure, uh, the blues. A gag from "A Mighty Wind"?
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1999 | ROBERT HILBURN
* * * FREAKWATER "End Time" Thrill Jockey If you were planning to make one of your 1999 album purchases a folk-country indie-minded delight such as Alison Krauss or Gillian Welch, redirect your attention to this veteran Chicago outfit. Krauss' recent "Forget About It" was surprisingly devoid of emotion, and Welch's follow-up to "Hell Among the Yearlings" won't be out until 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
NEW YORK -- Early during the magnificent tribute to folk music at Town Hall while much of America was learning the fate of "Breaking Bad's" Walter White, actor John Goodman welcomed the capacity crowd to a night of reckoning devoted to what he called "weeping and wailing and sowing and reaping. " Performing folk songs from the canon, many of which are featured in the forthcoming Coen brothers film "Inside Llewyn Davis" and its soundtrack, what followed on Sunday night was three-plus hours focused on hard truths and tested faith, on doubt, death and, of course, rocket ships to the moon.  A movie set in the Greenwich Village folk scene of the early 1960s, "Inside Llewyn Davis" features music curated by T Bone Burnett, and though the night bore his imprimatur, it was the artists who burned.  TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts Specifically: Joan Baez, Patti Smith, Jack White, Gillian Welch & David Rawlings, the Punch Brothers, Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford, the Milk Carton Kids -- take a breath, because the lineup was packed with talent -- Oscar Isaac, the Avett Bros., Conor Oberst, Secret Sisters, Willie Watson, the Carolina Chocolate Drops'  Rhiannon Giddens and more delivered sharpened songs on acoustic instruments, singing in pitch perfect tone that left an oft-awestruck audience silently stunned -- then vocally thrilled.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2006 | Geoff Boucher
This week one of California's most beloved rock music institutions will celebrate its 20th anniversary and, as always, the artists need only glance over their shoulders to the rear of the stage to see the true VIPs on hand. The 2006 edition of the Bridge School Benefit Concert will be Saturday and Sunday at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, and don't think for a minute that it's not worth the trip to the Silicon Valley or digging out a scarf.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1997 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mary Chapin Carpenter's country-pop albums have sold millions and earned her multiple Grammys, even as her music has maintained an intimate, folkie sensibility that would be at home in a hippie coffeehouse. Carpenter infused much of that intimacy into her performance Sunday at the Universal Amphitheatre, dividing the nearly two-hour set between stripped-down solo acoustic turns and full-on rocking with her band.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | STEVE MATTEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few movies in recent years have made music such an integral element as "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," Joel and Ethan Coen's twisted take on Homer's "The Odyssey" set in the Depression-era hard times of Mississippi in the 1930s. The old-time music is not merely an atmospheric backdrop to the action. Drawn from country, Delta blues, bluegrass, gospel and regional variations of these genres, it was put together by the Coen brothers and music producer T Bone Burnett before the film began shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2002 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As cult heroes go, singer-songwriter Jay Farrar is pretty reliable. During his Knitting Factory performance Saturday, his current work proved cut from the same moody, bucolic cloth as the pioneering alt-country material he crafted with high school pal Jeff Tweedy in Uncle Tupelo and later as the leader of Son Volt. With Son Volt on indefinite hiatus, Farrar released his solo debut, "Sebastopol," last fall.
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