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August 18, 1996 | David Gritten, David Gritten, based in England, is a regular contributor to Calendar
"There's a tremendous buoyancy and sense of expectation in Scotland at the moment," director Gillies MacKinnon says. "We're making a lot of films here now. But is there a Scottish school? Do the films have anything in common? A certain impudence, maybe. But I don't think we know ourselves what the style is." Until last year, international audiences were only rarely exposed to films made in or about Scotland. It simply isn't a country that had registered on the world's cinematic consciousness.
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August 18, 1996 | David Gritten, David Gritten, based in England, is a regular contributor to Calendar
"There's a tremendous buoyancy and sense of expectation in Scotland at the moment," director Gillies MacKinnon says. "We're making a lot of films here now. But is there a Scottish school? Do the films have anything in common? A certain impudence, maybe. But I don't think we know ourselves what the style is." Until last year, international audiences were only rarely exposed to films made in or about Scotland. It simply isn't a country that had registered on the world's cinematic consciousness.
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August 4, 1996 | Michael Wilmington
Full of bawdy lyricism and rough-hewn wit, this 1992 Irish pastorale, set in 1957 and revolving around the interactions of a small town and a troupe of traveling players led by Aidan Quinn (pictured), is writer Shane ("My Left Foot") Connaughton's salute to his provincial roots. Directed on location by Gillies MacKinnon, it's rich and charming--and stolen entirely by Albert Finney as the tormented town cop, burning for the woman (Robin Wright) who won't have him (ABC early Monday at 12:05
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | Michael Wilmington
Full of bawdy lyricism and rough-hewn wit, this 1992 Irish pastorale, set in 1957 and revolving around the interactions of a small town and a troupe of traveling players led by Aidan Quinn (pictured), is writer Shane ("My Left Foot") Connaughton's salute to his provincial roots. Directed on location by Gillies MacKinnon, it's rich and charming--and stolen entirely by Albert Finney as the tormented town cop, burning for the woman (Robin Wright) who won't have him (ABC early Monday at 12:05
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
With this captivating heart-tugger, Steve Martin (pictured) took an all-out plunge of basing this 1994 film on no less than George Eliot's 1861 grim novel "Silas Marner." What Martin, who also wrote the screenplay, and director Gillies MacKinnon have created in their free adaptation is a family film that might be best described as a serious comedy. Consistent with Martin's growing collection of thinking man's comedy (TMC Sunday at 7 p.m. and Friday at 7:10 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Judi Dench wailing on tenor sax? Leslie Caron pounding the bass? Olympia Dukakis on trumpet? Now that's music. First-run independent films are now on HBO's agenda, witness tonight's arrival of Alan Plater's slight but charming comedy about a nearly all-female swing band that reinvents itself 56 years after playing in London as German bombs fell on the city in World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Regeneration" is as bleak as it is thoughtful, a traditional-style Scottish-British-Canadian production with polished dialogue and superlative performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1996 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Scottish director Gillies MacKinnon's "Small Faces" is being described as a look at the lives of three brothers on the fringes of gang life in 1960s Glasgow. It is certainly that, but more importantly, it is also a "baby of the family" story, a universal theme that plays out differently depending on the place, the baby and the family.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: The world premiere Tuesday of the Samuel Goldwyn Company's "The Playboys" at the Mann Criterion. A party followed at the nearby Santa Monica Pier carousel--very The-Biz-meets-the-child-within.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Impetuous! Homeric! " Barry Fitzgerald exclaimed, when he saw the ruined remnants of John Wayne's and Maureen O'Hara's nuptial bed in "The Quiet Man." It's that type of rough and wry blarney eloquence that infuses much of "The Playboys" (at the Park Theatre).
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
With this captivating heart-tugger, Steve Martin (pictured) took an all-out plunge of basing this 1994 film on no less than George Eliot's 1861 grim novel "Silas Marner." What Martin, who also wrote the screenplay, and director Gillies MacKinnon have created in their free adaptation is a family film that might be best described as a serious comedy. Consistent with Martin's growing collection of thinking man's comedy (TMC Sunday at 7 p.m. and Friday at 7:10 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How do you follow up the most successful film of all time? If you're "Titanic" star Kate Winslet, you return to making the distinctive, venturesome small films that established your career. Indeed, "Hideous Kinky" is the riskiest picture Winslet has made since "Heavenly Creatures," the surreal New Zealand feature about real-life teen killers, which first brought her international acclaim in 1994.
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