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Gina B Nahai

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NEWS
June 7, 1999 | CHARLOTTE INNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bestselling novelist Gina B. Nahai was talking to a woman she'd known from her childhood in Iran, when the friend shocked her with a story Nahai had never heard before. "She's telling me someone else's story, and she says, 'All this happened when I got out of the hospital.' And I say, 'What?' And she says, 'Well, you know, after my mother threw me off the roof.'
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 27, 2007
Re "For some, Beverly Hills ballots went too Farsi," Feb. 23 Nearly 30 years have gone by since the original Iranian immigrants settled in Beverly Hills and the surrounding areas. By far, the majority of us spoke perfect English even then. Since that time, two generations of our children have been born and educated in this country. They have excelled -- indeed, become leaders -- in every artistic, professional and commercial field. The printing of Persian-language ballots for a population that is as successful and integrated as the Iranians in Beverly Hills is patronizing and offensive to the very people it purports to serve.
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OPINION
February 27, 2007
Re "For some, Beverly Hills ballots went too Farsi," Feb. 23 Nearly 30 years have gone by since the original Iranian immigrants settled in Beverly Hills and the surrounding areas. By far, the majority of us spoke perfect English even then. Since that time, two generations of our children have been born and educated in this country. They have excelled -- indeed, become leaders -- in every artistic, professional and commercial field. The printing of Persian-language ballots for a population that is as successful and integrated as the Iranians in Beverly Hills is patronizing and offensive to the very people it purports to serve.
BOOKS
October 14, 2001 | MARCOS McPEEK VILLATORO, Marcos McPeek Villatoro is the author, most recently, of "Home Killings: A Romilia Chacon Mystery" and holds the Fletcher Jones-endowed chair in writing at Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles
Look in my laundry room cabinet here in Los Angeles and you'll find a Mason jar of clear alcohol. It's never been opened, but I know its smell, its taste. Shake the jar: Bubbles will form on top and separate clean down the middle like a zipper: a good batch. My father, born on Clinch Mountain in east Tennessee 81 years ago, gave it to me when I moved to California. His cousin Willie brewed it.
BOOKS
October 14, 2001 | MARCOS McPEEK VILLATORO, Marcos McPeek Villatoro is the author, most recently, of "Home Killings: A Romilia Chacon Mystery" and holds the Fletcher Jones-endowed chair in writing at Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles
Look in my laundry room cabinet here in Los Angeles and you'll find a Mason jar of clear alcohol. It's never been opened, but I know its smell, its taste. Shake the jar: Bubbles will form on top and separate clean down the middle like a zipper: a good batch. My father, born on Clinch Mountain in east Tennessee 81 years ago, gave it to me when I moved to California. His cousin Willie brewed it.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Banished from Iran at age 6 to a Catholic boarding school in Pasadena, Lili, the Jewish girl who narrates part of Gina B. Nahai's entrancing second novel, wonders why. Why did her mother, Roxanna the Angel, step out of a window on Tehran's Avenue of Faith one moonlit night and flyaway? Why did her father, brooding in a mansion being stripped of its valuables, then get rid of her? We, too, inured to the conventions of Latin American magical realism, wonder why.
BOOKS
September 9, 2007
Jonathan Kirsch reviews "The Headmaster's Dilemma," a novel by Louis Auchincloss. Bill Boyarsky reviews "Broken Government: How Republican Rule Destroyed the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial Branches" by John W. Dean. Tim Rutten reviews "The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy" by John J. Mearsheimer and Stephen M. Walt. The following reviews are scheduled: Patt Morrison reviews "If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer," with commentary by the Goldman family.
TRAVEL
October 4, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
As you know all too well, readers, we need guidance. Your guidance. In this case, it's your L.A. book picks we need - not just great books but books that will clue a newcomer in to this place, physically and socially, past, present and future.  As part of our ever-growing Southern California Close-Ups project, we're pulling together a list of volumes that speak volumes about Los Angeles - maybe 50 books, maybe more, fiction and nonfiction. So here are the beginnings of our list, in no particular order.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2007 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Caspian Rain A Novel Gina B. Nahai MacAdam Cage: 300 pp., $25 -- A girl from the wrong side of the tracks marries a wealthy, arrogant young man who quickly tires of her and abandons her and their daughter. It's a familiar story. But transplant these characters to Iran in the decade before the Islamic Revolution, during the shah's final years, toss in some magical realism and the plot becomes more intriguing. That's the setting of "Caspian Rain," the entrancing fourth novel by Gina B.
BOOKS
October 21, 2007
*--* Fiction weeks on list 1. A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead: 21 $25.95) Two Afghan women struggle to survive jihad, civil war and Taliban tyranny. 2. Run by Ann Patchett (Harper: $25.95) A widower faces 2 complications when one of his children is shadowed by the birth mother. 3. Playing for Pizza by John Grisham (Doubleday: $21.95) A 2 hack pro quarterback finds refuge on a football team in Parma, Italy. 4.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | CHARLOTTE INNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bestselling novelist Gina B. Nahai was talking to a woman she'd known from her childhood in Iran, when the friend shocked her with a story Nahai had never heard before. "She's telling me someone else's story, and she says, 'All this happened when I got out of the hospital.' And I say, 'What?' And she says, 'Well, you know, after my mother threw me off the roof.'
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Banished from Iran at age 6 to a Catholic boarding school in Pasadena, Lili, the Jewish girl who narrates part of Gina B. Nahai's entrancing second novel, wonders why. Why did her mother, Roxanna the Angel, step out of a window on Tehran's Avenue of Faith one moonlit night and flyaway? Why did her father, brooding in a mansion being stripped of its valuables, then get rid of her? We, too, inured to the conventions of Latin American magical realism, wonder why.
OPINION
April 12, 2002
In your April 9 editorial, you say that "Arab nations should pressure Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat to stop the Palestinian violence." Of course they should. But President Bush hasn't succeeded in doing so despite his many statements urging Arafat to stop the terrorists' attacks and to turn over those responsible for the assassination of an Israeli Cabinet member to Israeli authorities. What signs have you read to indicate that the Arab nations will pressure Arafat? Has there been any good-faith action on Arafat's part?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2009 | David Zahniser and Phil Willon
After nearly two years of fending off criticism from ratepayers and his own employees, H. David Nahai stepped down Friday as head of the nation's largest municipally owned utility, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Nahai, 56, said in a letter to Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa that he would leave immediately to take a position as an advisor to former President Clinton's climate initiative to battle global warming. But well before he announced his new job, the Iranian-born environmentalist and attorney found himself under fire on several fronts.
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