Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGiraffe
IN THE NEWS

Giraffe

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
The Los Angeles Zoo this week announced its first birth of a rare okapi -- also known as a forest giraffe. The calf was born Aug. 26 but until now was kept out of public view while it bonded with his mother. Okapis are shy, with velvety fur, zebra-like black and white strips on their legs, and a prehensile tongue that can be as long as 18 inches, according to the zoo. They are the closest living relative to the giraffe and are found in the forests of Central Africa. Adult okapis grow to more than 6 feet tall and weigh between 400 and 700 pounds.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
The Danish zoo that drew so much criticism for killing a healthy young giraffe named Marius and inviting schoolchildren to watch as he was dismembered and fed to lions is at it again. This time, the zoo announced that it euthanized four healthy lions Monday to make way for a young male lion. It did not say what it did with their carcasses, nor whether they were among those who ate Marius. Of course it's tempting for any older person to anthropomorphize the situation (four old guys equals one young guy)
Advertisement
NEWS
August 5, 2010 | By Lindsay Barnett, Los Angeles Times
A male Rothschild giraffe calf born late last month at the Prague Zoo is gunning for the title of World's Cutest Zoo Baby. He has some tough competition -- an Amur leopard cub in Germany, a red-necked wallaby joey in Australia, a pair of Asian lion cubs in Germany, a parma wallaby joey in Ohio and a koala joey in Germany, to name a few -- but we think the sweet, snuggly relationship he has with his mother Nora just...
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The bad news: Exotic acacia trees pose a pesky problem for native coastal dunes at Los Angeles International Airport. The good news: Giraffes like them -- a lot. Now a long-term partnership that began last fall between the airport and the L.A. Zoo keeps invasive species out of L.A.'s landfills and gives zoo animals a leafy treat. "At first I thought, 'Can we bring the giraffe to the sand dunes?'" environmental specialist Peggy Nguyen said Wednesday in describing how the plan took root.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Imagine a university whose young communications students mingle with ancient Buddhas who perpetually watch TV. A campus whose Arcadian groves have been infiltrated by "talking trees." An institution of higher education with a flamboyant "Sun God" sculpture as its official mascot. A hall of learning said to have "giraffe nets" and Stonehenge-like "ruins" on its grounds. A state-owned facility expected to install a neon parade of virtues and vices atop a new building next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1986
Checkers, a giraffe at the San Diego Zoo, gave birth Saturday to a healthy baby in full view of about 100 spectators who were visiting the exhibit, said Georgeanne Irvine, a spokeswoman for the zoo. The 6-foot-tall female, who is Checkers' 11th offspring, was born at 10:40 a.m. and stood up about an hour later. The unnamed baby giraffe will be kept in a barn out of public view for about a week before being put back on exhibit, Irvine said.
OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The killing of a young giraffe at a Danish zoo - after which it was publicly butchered and fed to a lion - breaks what should be the most inviolate if unwritten contract when humans remove wild animals from their natural habitat: to protect and keep healthy those animals and their descendants. A spokesman for the Copenhagen Zoo said the killing with a bolt gun of the 2-year-old giraffe was done to prevent inbreeding of the zoo's population. The zoo brushed off other options, such as giving the animal to another willing zoo (and there were several)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Oakland Zoo's new bundle of joy weighs 170 pounds and stands well over 6 feet tall. He's a 2-week-old giraffe born in captivity. Zoo employees named him "the Brave Little Toaster" after the animated children's films. The giraffe has grown two inches and gained 20 pounds since he was born Feb. 6. "He's spunky, willing to explore and always full of energy," said zookeeper Melissa McCartney. The animal will be ready to join the herd and stick his neck out to the public in a week or two.
NEWS
March 18, 2011
There's a very tall animal in this photo. Do you see it? Look at the center and you'll spot a giraffe watching Times reader "rdabk96. " "On safari in the Serengeti last month, my wife, Gloria, asked me to take some pictures of the sunset over the lake near our mobile tented camp, since we would be leaving for home the next day," says the photographer. "To my surprise, I found a giraffe looking back at me from the bush. " The Serengeti plain in Tanzania and Kenya is renowned for sights such as this one. Huge herds of mammals, including wildebeests, gazelles, giraffes and zebras, roam these vast grasslands.
NEWS
June 8, 2008 | Abeer Allam, Bloomberg News
In most zoos, employees feed and care for the animals. At Egypt's Giza Zoo, police say, workers have been turning them into dinner or selling them as pets. When two Moroccan camels were butchered in August, the perpetrators left behind only the hide and hooves. A police investigation found that a zookeeper had slaughtered the animals and sold the meat to supplement his monthly wage. More than 400 animals, including foxes, zebras, a black panther and a giraffe, have vanished from the government-run menagerie in the last three years, according to police documents.
OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The killing of a young giraffe at a Danish zoo - after which it was publicly butchered and fed to a lion - breaks what should be the most inviolate if unwritten contract when humans remove wild animals from their natural habitat: to protect and keep healthy those animals and their descendants. A spokesman for the Copenhagen Zoo said the killing with a bolt gun of the 2-year-old giraffe was done to prevent inbreeding of the zoo's population. The zoo brushed off other options, such as giving the animal to another willing zoo (and there were several)
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Los Angeles designer Annabel Inganni has expanded her Wolfum line of pattern-rich designs this year to include drinking glasses, coasters, wall hooks and picture frames. In search of some smaller, less expensive items for our Handmade Holiday Gift Guide, we mulled all the good options (Groovy coasters? Nicely priced serving trays?) and ultimately went with these ornaments -- like much of the Wolfum line, hand printed on Baltic birch.  MORE PICKS: Handmade Holidays gift gallery We could see the deer, giraffe, chimp and feather (not pictured)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
The Los Angeles Zoo this week announced its first birth of a rare okapi -- also known as a forest giraffe. The calf was born Aug. 26 but until now was kept out of public view while it bonded with his mother. Okapis are shy, with velvety fur, zebra-like black and white strips on their legs, and a prehensile tongue that can be as long as 18 inches, according to the zoo. They are the closest living relative to the giraffe and are found in the forests of Central Africa. Adult okapis grow to more than 6 feet tall and weigh between 400 and 700 pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Who let the dogs out? In 2009 the Baha Men's lyrics felt caustic, clever, comical and slightly subversive, perfect for the debauched Las Vegas bachelor party that was about to unfold. Phil, Stu and Alan - a.k.a. the Wolfpack, played by Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis - were about to begin their politically incorrect, impossibly irreverent and consistently perverse struggle to reconstruct the night and figure out where they lost the groom. Side-splittingly hilarious, it used a heady blend of Mike Tyson, a Bengal tiger, a hooker, a baby, a chicken and a crazed, screaming and sometimes naked Mr. Chow to incredible comic effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2013 | By Jason Wells
This Sofie is no teething toy. The Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens on Thursday announced the successful birth of a female giraffe named Sofie, a close riff on the wildly popular Sophie baby teething toy in the likeness of a giraffe. The zoo's Sofie, however, is a bit larger, weighing in at 135 pounds and standing 6 feet tall. She was named by the great granddaughter of zoo donor Robert McMillan, according to an announcement issued on Thursday. Sofie, born on April 22, is the first calf for the zoo's Masai giraffe, Hafina.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
"The Hangover Part III" trailer promises plenty of mayhem as we see the return of Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms and Ken Jeong for the final installment of Todd Phillips' trilogy. The latest trailer includes very few lines of dialogue and only hints at the plot: Revenge on Sin City. The teaser dramatically opens with Cooper and Helms' characters -- Phil and Stu, respectively -- attending a funeral, which showcases a moving "Ave Maria" solo from Galifianakis' Alan. "My God. He's got the voice of an angel," Phil says.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
"The Hangover Part III" trailer promises plenty of mayhem as we see the return of Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms and Ken Jeong for the final installment of Todd Phillips' trilogy. The latest trailer includes very few lines of dialogue and only hints at the plot: Revenge on Sin City. The teaser dramatically opens with Cooper and Helms' characters -- Phil and Stu, respectively -- attending a funeral, which showcases a moving "Ave Maria" solo from Galifianakis' Alan. "My God. He's got the voice of an angel," Phil says.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Los Angeles designer Annabel Inganni has expanded her Wolfum line of pattern-rich designs this year to include drinking glasses, coasters, wall hooks and picture frames. In search of some smaller, less expensive items for our Handmade Holiday Gift Guide, we mulled all the good options (Groovy coasters? Nicely priced serving trays?) and ultimately went with these ornaments -- like much of the Wolfum line, hand printed on Baltic birch.  MORE PICKS: Handmade Holidays gift gallery We could see the deer, giraffe, chimp and feather (not pictured)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
At the premiere of "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" last month, a clutch of impassioned animal activists gathered on Hollywood Boulevard. But they weren't there to throw red paint on fur-coat-wearing celebrities. Instead, one demonstrator — dressed in a full-body monkey suit — had arrived with a sign complimenting the filmmakers: "Thanks for not using real apes!" The creative team behind "Apes" used motion-capture technology to create digitalized primates, spending tens of millions of dollars on technology that records an actor's performance and later layers it with computer graphics to create a final image — in this case, one of a realistic-looking ape. "There are some performing animals that actually do have a more fulfilling life, but apes, you could probably say that's not the case," director Rupert Wyatt said.
NEWS
March 18, 2011
There's a very tall animal in this photo. Do you see it? Look at the center and you'll spot a giraffe watching Times reader "rdabk96. " "On safari in the Serengeti last month, my wife, Gloria, asked me to take some pictures of the sunset over the lake near our mobile tented camp, since we would be leaving for home the next day," says the photographer. "To my surprise, I found a giraffe looking back at me from the bush. " The Serengeti plain in Tanzania and Kenya is renowned for sights such as this one. Huge herds of mammals, including wildebeests, gazelles, giraffes and zebras, roam these vast grasslands.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|