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NEWS
May 8, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's doctors said Tuesday they believe they have found the cause of his recent heart irregularity--a mildly overactive thyroid gland that is expected to be easily treatable. In a briefing at Bethesda Naval Medical Center, Bush's chief physician, Dr. Burton Lee, said he was "pleased by this turn of events" because it cleared up questions about the cause of Bush's ailment and because such problems are "usually resolved within a short time."
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SCIENCE
February 14, 2013 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
About 30,000 years ago, a tiny mutation arose in a gene known as EDAR and began to spread rapidly in central China, eventually becoming common in the region. This week, scientists at Harvard University offered some explanations for why the EDAR mutation may have been so successful - by observing how it affects mice, animals long used in disease research but never before pressed into service for the study of human evolution. The small change, substituting one chemical letter of DNA for another, may have helped humans in Asia survive crippling heat and humidity by endowing them with extra sweat glands, the scientists reported Thursday in the journal Cell.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1990 | Compiled from Times wire and staff reports
Research in animals suggests that treatment with a hormone called epidermal growth factor may help in treatment of a rare genetic disorder that makes humans unable to sweat properly, Canadian researchers reported last week. About one in every 10,000 babies is born with the disease, called hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, which causes them to have few or no sweat glands, no hair and dental abnormalities.
SPORTS
February 24, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Mike Butcher was not overly concerned in mid-January when a routine visit to a doctor for a bone spur in his neck led to the discovery of a small growth and a trip to a specialist for a biopsy. "There was no doubt in my mind I didn't have anything wrong," the Angels' pitching coach said. "I thought maybe it was a cyst. " When test results showed he had papillary thyroid cancer, "My immediate reaction was 'Whoa,' you don't want to hear the C-word," said Butcher, 45. "I was shocked.
HEALTH
January 21, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Saliva is a humdrum liquid, the stuff of giggles, dribbles and schoolyard grossness. It's hardly something to take seriously--until, that is, you lack it. When your glands no longer pump out a normal and robust 2 to 3 pints daily, then you'll come to appreciate spit for the wondrous substance it is--one that does far more than render food slimy and digestible. Saliva, science has revealed, is much more than water. It is packed with proteins that help control the teeming hordes of microbes in our mouths.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
In the first operation of its kind in California, surgeons at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center have implanted adrenal gland tissues into the brain of a 43-year-old man with Parkinson's disease, it was announced Tuesday. The patient, a former Los Angeles carpet layer, is at least the 46th Parkinson's victim in the world to undergo the experimental surgery and the 11th in the United States. The first U.S. patient underwent the test procedure on April 9 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush is suffering from Graves' disease, a common and treatable thyroid condition that is not life-threatening, his physicians announced Thursday. "The President remains in excellent spirits, is in good health, without adverse symptoms of any kind," said Dr. Burton Lee, Bush's personal physician. He said that he and Bush's other physicians have urged the President to relax his schedule temporarily.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on "Good Morning America" that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks.
HEALTH
January 28, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The products: We all carry the residue of modern living deep within our bodies. We get mercury from fish, pesticides from apples and polyvinyl chlorides from that "new-car smell." A 2005 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study of more than 2,000 people across the country found traces of more than 60 toxic compounds, including such nasty stuff as dioxins and uranium, in the blood and urine of participants.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | JOAN LIBMAN
Dr. Jay Goldstein of Anaheim Hills has spent the last five years researching and treating patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating disease characterized by incapacitating exhaustion and a range of other perplexing symptoms. Explaining his theory of an unknown retrovirus invading the immune system, inducing cells to produce a chemical transmitter affecting the entire body, Goldstein pauses. "You know," the family practitioner says, "some very respected physicians will tell you I am crazy."
SCIENCE
May 29, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Medications, laser treatment and surgery can all arrest the growth of an enlarged prostate gland, but only surgery can produce an improvement in symptoms, particularly a reduction in incontinence, researchers said Saturday. The surgery, known as transurethral resection of the prostate, or TURP, is generally reserved for those who have failed to respond to drug treatment or who cannot tolerate the medications, but the new findings suggest it might be useful to introduce it earlier in the course of the disease, said Dr. Amy Krambeck of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
SPORTS
October 22, 2007 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
BOSTON -- Just what baseball needed before its most eagerly awaited game of the postseason -- a performance-enhancing-drug scandal involving a popular player on the Cleveland Indians, who had enough on their plates trying to prepare for Game 7 of the American League Championship Series against the Boston Red Sox on Sunday night.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
Oprah Winfrey recently informed the nation on "Good Morning America" that she "blew out her thyroid" at the end of last season because of stress. But that isn't exactly a medical term. No one blows out a thyroid, says endocrinologist Dr. Terry Smith of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. "What is that? Like a right rear tire on a Ferrari?" he asks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2007 | Courtney E. Martin, The Baltimore Sun
If Marshall McLuhan was right that "the medium is the message," in the case of wildly popular fake news, the message must be: Laugh your head off or you'll just end up crying your eyes out. But what if a few angry and motivating tears are what we need? What if all this laughing is pacifying us, making us inert? I hate to say it -- I love my Amy Poehler fix as much as the next gal -- but I fear that therapeutic irony is rendering us politically impotent.
HEALTH
July 12, 2004 | Timothy Gower, Special to The Times
The day may come when doctors ask a surprising question to evaluate a male patient's risk for prostate cancer: "How's your sex life?" This spring, a pair of studies suggested that a man's sexual habits and history might influence the likelihood that he would develop prostate cancer, which kills nearly 30,000 men in the United States each year. The research adds to a body of evidence gathered during the last four decades.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A combination of two widely used drugs can sharply reduce the risk that enlarged prostate glands will get worse, offering millions of men a dramatically more effective way to fend off the most miserable effects of one of the most common male afflictions, researchers reported Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
Yuck, more gross-outs from director Stuart Gordon and Empire Entertainment--who brought us the gore-feastings film "Re-Animator." It's "From Beyond," just shot in Italy, due for screens in October. We took a look at the script (from a short story by horrormeister H. P. Lovecraft) and found it oozing with scares. Read the following at your own risk: This crazed doctor with a weird personal life (he likes his women in bondage) has an equally bizarr-o professional quest.
HEALTH
January 21, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Scientists have worked hard to figure out how our salivary glands strut their stuff--both because it's interesting and because knowledge could point the way to therapies. Structurally, the glands are rather like bunches of grapes. At one end (buried in the flesh of our mouths) are those "grapes"--round clusters of cells that secrete the water and many of the proteins and chemicals of our spit.
HEALTH
December 15, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Millions of Americans take Synthroid or its generic equivalent each day to treat an underactive thyroid gland, but some still complain they don't feel right. They may be sluggish, forgetful or put on extra pounds. Synthroid, also called levothyroxine, is a synthetic form of the thyroid hormone thyroxine, called T4. The body converts it into an active form of thyroid hormone called triiodothyronine, or T3.
HEALTH
May 26, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Having struggled with acne for more than a decade, Aaron Goldberg had tried everything from antibiotics and prescription skin creams to Accutane, pills that often clear stubborn acne but carry many side effects. When his acne gradually returned about a year after finishing a course of Accutane, Goldberg, a 24-year-old law student, thought he had run out of options. He was wrong.
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