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Glaucoma

NEWS
July 31, 1994
Researchers are seeking people at risk of developing glaucoma to take part in a nationwide study on whether the disease can be prevented or delayed through the early use of prescription eyedrops. UCLA's Jules Stein Eye Institute and Charles R. Drew University are urging people between the ages of 40 and 80 who believe they may develop glaucoma to contact Rebecca Ann Rudenko at (213) 563-5903 about free screenings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1994 | MALCOLM RITTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A tiny disc placed on the eyes of rabbits released a substance that lowered the fluid pressure inside their eyeballs, suggesting a possible new approach to treating glaucoma. In glaucoma, which affects perhaps 3 million Americans age 40 and over, excessive fluid pressure in the eye can damage the optic nerve and lead to blindness. Most cases are treated with eye drops. But they can cause side effects, patients do not always take them, and they eventually stop working in many patients.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | ANDREW M. PRINCE, ASSOCIATED PRESS; Dr. Andrew M. Prince is a clinical assistant professor of ophthalmology and co-director of the Glaucoma Service at New York University Medical Center
An estimated 1 million Americans with glaucoma are unaware that they have the condition, the second leading cause of blindness in the United States. Glaucoma is an especially acute problem for black Americans, for whom it is the leading cause of blindness. Black Americans have a fourfold higher incidence of the disease than do whites, and blindness caused by glaucoma is six to eight times more prevalent among black Americans than whites. The reason for the difference is not known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State medical officials have accused a Burbank eye doctor of botching cataract surgery on one elderly patient who later went blind and of giving an excessive number of laser "shots" to another who was left with almost no vision in the treated eye. Dr. Akim F. Czmus also misdiagnosed a 15-year-old girl as having glaucoma, an increase in eyeball pressure that can lead to blindness, despite normal pressure readings and the rarity of the condition among teen-agers, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1991 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Blacks are four to five times more likely than whites to develop one of the most common causes of preventable blindness in the United States, according to the first major study to explore in detail long-suspected racial differences in rates of glaucoma. The study, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., found that disparities in health care did not explain the racial gap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1990 | Reprinted from the July issue of The Johns Hopkins Medical Letter. and
"I haven't felt a thing, felt it at all." --President George Bush, after he learned he was at risk for glaucoma. If George Bush hadn't been President--and under the watchful care of his own personal physician--he might very well have not bothered to see an ophthalmologist since he hadn't "felt a thing."
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
Two prominent eye doctors confirmed Wednesday that President Bush has a mild form of glaucoma, but said he need not continue using prescription eye drops. "Extensive testing of the eye, including detailed photographs, once again revealed no abnormalities and no visual loss," said Dr. Burton Lee, the White House physician. "It was decided to stop the Betagan eye drops and follow him closely for now, on no treatment."
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush emerged from a five-hour health examination Thursday and pronounced himself "like a spring colt." White House doctor Burton Lee agreed that Bush is in excellent health, although the routine physical did turn up "an early glaucoma" in Bush's left eye. The diagnosis was made at Bethesda Naval Hospital outside Washington. Bush, 65, will be required to take eye drops daily for the ailment. Extensive tests showed no visual impairment.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush is suffering from "an early glaucoma" in his left eye, medical tests disclosed today. The glaucoma, which the White House said has not affected his vision, was discovered during a routine physical at Bethesda Naval Hospital, the White House said. It will be treated with eyedrops. In general, Bush "is in excellent health," White House physician Dr. Burton Lee said in a statement released by the press office after the President's 5-hour examination.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | BRIAN MURPHY, Associated Press
Elvy Musikka begins most days as she ends them--smoking a legal joint and hoping others like her can some day do the same. Either rolled like a cigarette or baked into brownies, marijuana has been in Musikka's life for more than 12 years as she tried to lessen the effects of glaucoma, which has left her with only 10% of her sight. But she clearly sees herself as a crusader for the thousands of glaucoma victims throughout the United States denied legal use of the drug that reduces the high eye pressure caused by the disease.
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