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Glenda Jackson

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1990 | MAUREEN JOHNSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Glenda Jackson, the Academy Award-winning actress and socialist, is within reach of a dream: abandoning the stage for politics. Jackson still has her choice of stage and screen roles, but she's also a liberal who has chosen to tie her future to the Labor Party, the socialist opposition. If elected, she faces the comparative obscurity of being a backbencher, a rank-and-file lawmaker in the 650-member House of Commons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For years, Vanessa Redgrave was the most prominent actress-politician in Britain--but, despite two attempts, she was never elected to Parliament. Three years ago, her contemporary, Glenda Jackson, gave up acting for politics and got elected to the House of Commons, where she raises her voice now and then to denounce the Conservative government of Prime Minister John Major.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1986 | MARY BLUME
More than just about any actress, Glenda Jackson has shown that she can do just about anything, although she has not always thought so. In the early 1970s, for example, already an Oscar winner for Ken Russell's "Women in Love," she expressed reservations about her ability to play comedy, then went off to win a second Oscar for the comedy "A Touch of Class." The ability to do anything is one thing: Glenda Jackson actually goes out and does it.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | Associated Press
Here are some of the prominent winners in Britain's national election: * Glenda Jackson, 55, a two-time Academy Award winner, won as a Labor candidate in the north London district of Hampstead and Highgate. The district had elected a Conservative for 80 of the previous 85 years. * Olympic gold medalist Sebastian Coe, 35, was the first to the finish line in Falmouth, winning as a Conservative. Coe won gold medals in the 1,500-meter races at the 1980 and 1984 Olympics.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For years, Vanessa Redgrave was the most prominent actress-politician in Britain--but, despite two attempts, she was never elected to Parliament. Three years ago, her contemporary, Glenda Jackson, gave up acting for politics and got elected to the House of Commons, where she raises her voice now and then to denounce the Conservative government of Prime Minister John Major.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1989
"You never ever have to work for the camera's attention. It is totally obsessed with what you're going to do. Whereas you do have to spend a lot of energy simply licking an audience into shape." --Glenda Jackson, currently headlining with John Lithgow in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood, in Drama-Logue.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Academy Award-winning actress Glenda Jackson says she will give up acting if she wins a seat in Parliament as a member of the Labor Party. "You can't be a part-time MP (member of Parliament), and you certainly can't be a part-time actor," said Jackson, 53, after she was chosen Tuesday by Labor locals in the Hampstead and Highgate areas of North London.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | Associated Press
Here are some of the prominent winners in Britain's national election: * Glenda Jackson, 55, a two-time Academy Award winner, won as a Labor candidate in the north London district of Hampstead and Highgate. The district had elected a Conservative for 80 of the previous 85 years. * Olympic gold medalist Sebastian Coe, 35, was the first to the finish line in Falmouth, winning as a Conservative. Coe won gold medals in the 1,500-meter races at the 1980 and 1984 Olympics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
In the high-tech Limehouse Studios lately erected alongside the Thames in the East End, Glenda Jackson is videotaping a 4 1/2-hour version of Eugene O'Neill's monumental and innovative nine-act play from 1928, "Strange Interlude." It will air on PBS, in an unprecedented scheduling, in three 90-minute segments on the successive nights of Jan. 18, 19 and 20 as the premiere 1988 offering of "American Playhouse."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
With sunlight streaming into the living room of his suite at a West Hollywood low-profile/high-celebrity hotel, Edward Albee ruminated on what it's like to direct his own plays. "It's a new experience each time," he said. "This is only the second time I've directed 'Virginia Woolf.' I did it on Broadway in 1976 with Colleen Dewhurst and Ben Gazzara. It went very nicely, got good press. This time, I'm learning more about the play."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1990 | MAUREEN JOHNSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Glenda Jackson, the Academy Award-winning actress and socialist, is within reach of a dream: abandoning the stage for politics. Jackson still has her choice of stage and screen roles, but she's also a liberal who has chosen to tie her future to the Labor Party, the socialist opposition. If elected, she faces the comparative obscurity of being a backbencher, a rank-and-file lawmaker in the 650-member House of Commons.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Academy Award-winning actress Glenda Jackson says she will give up acting if she wins a seat in Parliament as a member of the Labor Party. "You can't be a part-time MP (member of Parliament), and you certainly can't be a part-time actor," said Jackson, 53, after she was chosen Tuesday by Labor locals in the Hampstead and Highgate areas of North London.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1989
"You never ever have to work for the camera's attention. It is totally obsessed with what you're going to do. Whereas you do have to spend a lot of energy simply licking an audience into shape." --Glenda Jackson, currently headlining with John Lithgow in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood, in Drama-Logue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
With sunlight streaming into the living room of his suite at a West Hollywood low-profile/high-celebrity hotel, Edward Albee ruminated on what it's like to direct his own plays. "It's a new experience each time," he said. "This is only the second time I've directed 'Virginia Woolf.' I did it on Broadway in 1976 with Colleen Dewhurst and Ben Gazzara. It went very nicely, got good press. This time, I'm learning more about the play."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
In the high-tech Limehouse Studios lately erected alongside the Thames in the East End, Glenda Jackson is videotaping a 4 1/2-hour version of Eugene O'Neill's monumental and innovative nine-act play from 1928, "Strange Interlude." It will air on PBS, in an unprecedented scheduling, in three 90-minute segments on the successive nights of Jan. 18, 19 and 20 as the premiere 1988 offering of "American Playhouse."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1986 | MARY BLUME
More than just about any actress, Glenda Jackson has shown that she can do just about anything, although she has not always thought so. In the early 1970s, for example, already an Oscar winner for Ken Russell's "Women in Love," she expressed reservations about her ability to play comedy, then went off to win a second Oscar for the comedy "A Touch of Class." The ability to do anything is one thing: Glenda Jackson actually goes out and does it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
What you love about British actors is their stamina. Take Glenda Jackson. Having just played Nina in O'Neill's five-hour "Strange Interlude," she might seem eligible for a vacation. Instead she's gone straight into a production of Racine's "Phedre" at the Old Vic. The great Phedres have been French--Rachel, Bernhardt--and those names came up in the reviews, which were largely admiring. Some of Jackson's critics wanted more majesty, but everybody was impressed by her sheer firepower.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
What you love about British actors is their stamina. Take Glenda Jackson. Having just played Nina in O'Neill's five-hour "Strange Interlude," she might seem eligible for a vacation. Instead she's gone straight into a production of Racine's "Phedre" at the Old Vic. The great Phedres have been French--Rachel, Bernhardt--and those names came up in the reviews, which were largely admiring. Some of Jackson's critics wanted more majesty, but everybody was impressed by her sheer firepower.
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