Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGlenn Gould
IN THE NEWS

Glenn Gould

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1993 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
Is it safe to go back into the Mozart? You might well ask after the excesses of the 1991 celebratory year, with its ludicrous overkill in live performance, in seminars, book publishing and by the recording industry, which had never exactly ignored Salzburg's most commercialized son. The ensuing two years have, not unexpectedly, seen a dropping-off of Mozartean activity, to what might be called safe levels.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Reinventing Bach Paul Elie Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 498 pp., $30.00 Halfway through reading Paul Elie's "Reinventing Bach," I suddenly got dizzy. An earthquake? All-purpose angst? Or could it be that Bach was working as an agent of transcendence on me as he did on this sincere author? The basic pillars of this study are sturdy. Elie looks at how a composer influenced the outer and inner lives of four key 20th century Bachians - Albert Schweitzer, Pablo Casals, Leopold Stokowski and Glenn Gould - and how they then not only contributed to making Bach central to the modern musical experience but also radicalized it. Elie doesn't stop there.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2007
It was 25 years ago last month that Glenn Gould succumbed to a stroke in a Toronto hospital, scarcely more than a week after he had turned 50. But the legacy of this iconoclastic pianist continues to grow.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2011
The pouf is mightier than the pen when it comes to speaking fees at New Jersey's largest university. The Rutgers University Programming Assn. paid Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi of the reality TV show "Jersey Shore" $32,000 Thursday to dish on her hairstyle, fist pumps and the GTL — gym, tanning, laundry — lifestyle. That's $2,000 more than the $30,000 the university is paying Nobel-winning novelist Toni Morrison to deliver Rutgers' commencement address in May. Money for Polizzi's appearance came from the mandatory student activity fee. Snooki's advice to students: "Study hard, but party harder.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1993 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
The eccentricities of Canadian pianist Glenn Gould were better known to most of the world than his artistic achievements. Few media-watchers of the 1950s and '60s were unaware of Gould's practice of soaking his hands in boiling water before a performance, his arguments with piano benches (and conductors), his stentorian groaning while playing, his (in the earliest days) signature, yards-long scarf and demand for tropical temperatures in the recording studio.
BOOKS
January 21, 1990 | SONJA BOLLE
Pianist Glenn Gould (1932-1982) was a controversial performer throughout his three-decade recording career. He made his first recording (his famous Bach "Goldberg Variations") in 1956, and in 1964, gave up giving concerts forever.
BOOKS
May 7, 1989 | Nicolas Slonimsky, Slonimsky, conductor, composer, pianist, lexicographer and raconteur, recently published his autobiography, "Perfect Pitch: A Life Story" (Oxford University Press). and
This is a fascinating book about a fascinating musician. The author assembled thousands of facts about the life of Glenn Gould and interviewed about everybody who knew him personally, including surviving members of his family. The result is a cogent recital, beginning with Gould's early childhood and ending with his death after several disabling strokes, a few days after his 50th birthday on Oct. 4, 1982. Within the span of its 16 chapters, "A Life and Variations" progresses from a chronological account of Gould's brilliant career as a virtuoso pianist in America and in Europe, to his sudden decision to withdraw from the concert stage and devote himself exclusively to recording.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1994 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Colm Feore, a remarkably sensitive actor, gets to play a genial, eccentric, self-obsessed, self-possessed pianist in "Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould." Significantly, however, he never gets to play the piano. That may be just as well. Some things are hard to fake. Ask Charlton Heston, who was more convincing when he parted the Red Sea in "The Ten Commandments" than when he conducted a symphony orchestra in "Counterpoint."
BUSINESS
April 6, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
Forty-five years ago this week, the great Canadian pianist Glenn Gould stepped off the stage of the Wilshire Ebell Theatre and became the prophet of a new technology. Gould's act was an act of omission, not commission. That April 10, 1964, recital in the Los Angeles hall was the last concert he ever gave -- a forsaking of the tradition of public performance that was unprecedented for such a young (31) and eminent interpreter of Bach and Beethoven.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1999 | MARK SWED
In 1962, when Glenn Gould performed the Brahms D-minor with Leonard Bernstein at a famously controversial concert in Carnegie Hall, the pianist was 30, the conductor, 44; and each was the most talented and original musician of his generation. Those are close to the ages today of Leif Ove Andsnes and Simon Rattle. And the comparisons of these two recordings, a quarter-century apart, are fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010
'Genius Within: The Inner Life of Glenn Gould' MPAA rating: Unrated Running time: 1 hour, 49 minutes Playing: Laemmle's Royal, West Los Angeles; Laemmle's Playhouse 7, Pasadena; Laemmle's Town Center 5, Encino
BUSINESS
April 6, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
Forty-five years ago this week, the great Canadian pianist Glenn Gould stepped off the stage of the Wilshire Ebell Theatre and became the prophet of a new technology. Gould's act was an act of omission, not commission. That April 10, 1964, recital in the Los Angeles hall was the last concert he ever gave -- a forsaking of the tradition of public performance that was unprecedented for such a young (31) and eminent interpreter of Bach and Beethoven.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2007
It was 25 years ago last month that Glenn Gould succumbed to a stroke in a Toronto hospital, scarcely more than a week after he had turned 50. But the legacy of this iconoclastic pianist continues to grow.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2007 | Tim Page, Washington Post
Pianist Glenn Gould played Bach's "Goldberg" Variations in a 67th-floor condominium apartment here the other day. Gould wasn't there in person, of course: He retired from live performance more than 40 years ago and died in 1982. And indeed, the notes we heard him play were actually recorded in 1955, for the first of the more than 50 albums he made for Columbia Masterworks.
NEWS
October 23, 2003
Never been to a classical performance before? Remember, you're entering a specific culture. And, as with traveling, the wisest thing to do is: wait and observe. Here are tips on basic etiquette: * Be on time. Tardiness ensures the wrath of fellow concertgoers, and there is usually no late seating even between movements. * The bells are tolling for you: Stub out the cigarette, finish the drink and find your seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003
The art of Gould Scott Timberg's "The Cult of Gould" (Aug. 10) provides us with an interesting article on a fascinating topic, but I feel Timberg misses some of the most cogent points with respect to the art of Glenn Gould. Gould's eccentricities were mere window dressing; whatever he needed to do for his own psychological and physical comfort remains his own personal business. As Oscar Wilde said, "[A] truly great artist cannot conceive of life being shown, or beauty fashioned, under any conditions other than those that he has selected."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2003 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
It began, unpromisingly, with music written to put you to sleep. But when the dashing 22-year-old Glenn Gould recorded a little-known piece Bach had come up with to soothe an aristocratic insomniac, the pianist's ecstatic, ferocious playing kick-started popular interest in the composer. Few had heard him performed this way: as a living, almost modern, force.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|