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OPINION
April 21, 2007 | Hal Clifford, HAL CLIFFORD is executive editor of Orion magazine.
ENVIRONMENTALISM is dead. True, there are plenty of events Sunday marking the 38th anniversary of Earth Day. But most of the causes Americans associate with traditional environmentalism -- recycling, cleaning up a local waterway, protecting a piece of open space, saving an endangered species or even cleaning up the air -- well, they're pretty much irrelevant now.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
Don't expect a wholesale rush on the part of climate change skeptics or deniers to embrace the idea that human beings are responsible for global warming. Expect instead a slow melting of resistance as scientists turn up the heat. You'd like to think the new, alarming U.N. report on global climate change might provide a wake-up call to skeptics such as Republican Oklahoma U.S. Sen. James Inhofe, who once concluded a report attributing the existence of global warming to normal climate fluctuations by wondering whether “man-made global warming is the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people.” But no. On Monday, he dismissed the report as "another effort to scare people into believing in man-made global warming.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1998
We appreciated The Times' recognition of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change's role in providing a new and pragmatic voice in the climate change debate (editorial, Sept. 5). Through the companies that comprise our Business Environmental Leadership Council, we are working to find solutions to the challenge of climate change that will keep both the environment and the economy healthy. To clarify one important point though, the Pew Center does not do any lobbying. We are committed to being a resource for information and knowledge on the issue of climate change--whether it is for the media, policymakers or other businesses with a stake in the debate--but we are not engaged in any direct lobbying effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | James Rainey and Mark Z. Barabak
The vibe had to feel familiar to Arnold Schwarzenegger. Crowds flocked to his nationwide tour. A head of state staged a joint photo op, then sat for a little policy chitchat over breakfast. "Buff, bronzed and presidential" one news site declared of California's erstwhile governator, adding that he "has his sights set on the Oval Office. " There's no chance of that right now, owing to the constitutional ban on immigrants becoming president. Still, Schwarzenegger's recent environmental tour reanimated, in a small way, the elation of 2003, when he swept into the governor's office in an unprecedented recall election.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1989 | From United Press International
ICF Inc., an environmental consulting firm, said it has won a three-year, $37-million contract with the Environmental Protection Agency to help the agency study global climate change. The Fairfax, Va., company said it will assist the EPA in analyzing the impact of global warming and depletion of the Earth's ozone layer on human health and the environment.
NEWS
December 10, 2001
High-resolution images of Mars' south pole show changes in pits, ridges and mounds on the polar cap that suggest dramatic erosion of the cap's year-round frosty layers, a possible sign of global climate change, researchers reported in the Dec. 7 issue of Science. Photos taken by the Mars Global Surveyor show that as much as a third of the ice in the polar caps turns into gas each summer, much more than previously suspected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1998 | ANGELA CONSTABLE, Environmental sociologist Angela Constable teaches at Moorpark College and at Cal Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks
"Global warming" articles are again in the news as summer heat records collapse and Ventura County swelters through weeks of 100-degree temperatures. Although it may feel as though the Earth is getting hotter, global warming is an inaccurate description of what is happening to our weather patterns. A better term is "global climate change."
NATIONAL
April 22, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
You might expect Earth Day to be trumpeted with pictures of melting ice packs, disappearing glaciers and sad-looking polar bears. But that's so 47 seconds ago. Instead, we bring you a stunning photo gallery documenting the ways in which the world's explosive population growth has aggressively changed the landscape. The aerial photos above are just one example. They illustrate deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon between 1992 and 2006; the clearing in the Mato Grosso state in southwest Brazil is occurring at a rate of about 22,000 square kilometers per year.
OPINION
April 26, 2007
Re "Forget the whales -- save the Earth," Opinion, April 21 Hal Clifford anticipates that efforts to address global warming will make environmentalism irrelevant. This is like welcoming quadruple-bypass surgery because it will distract your doctor from reminding you to eat less and exercise more. For decades, environmentalists have presented us with a unified message: Life on this planet depends on the delicate balance of our ecosystem. Had we fully embraced their efforts to protect the habitats of individual endangered species, perhaps the knowledge gained could be helping us save our own now. Instead, decades of trivializing environmentalists (does the term "tree-hugger" sound funny anymore?
SCIENCE
February 15, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
Scientists say they are witnessing evolution in action in a population of North American red squirrels. The creatures are breeding earlier each year -- probably because of climate change. Stan Boutin of the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues have spent nearly 15 years tagging and observing thousands of squirrels in the Canadian Yukon.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
You might expect Earth Day to be trumpeted with pictures of melting ice packs, disappearing glaciers and sad-looking polar bears. But that's so 47 seconds ago. Instead, we bring you a stunning photo gallery documenting the ways in which the world's explosive population growth has aggressively changed the landscape. The aerial photos above are just one example. They illustrate deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon between 1992 and 2006; the clearing in the Mato Grosso state in southwest Brazil is occurring at a rate of about 22,000 square kilometers per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2011 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Ban Ki-moon, the normally buttoned-up Secretary General of the United Nations, swept into Los Angeles during Oscar week playing the role of Hollywood pitchman. His message: Make global warming a hot issue. "I need your support," he told entertainment industry insiders during a daylong forum Tuesday that focused on recent heat waves, floods, fires and drought, which scientists link to human-induced climate change . "Animate these stories!" Ban pleaded. "Set them to music!
NATIONAL
February 12, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
As record snowfall buried the nation's capital this week, the quickest joke around town was, "So much for global warming." The quip was timely, given the recent controversies over Climategate -- the release of e-mails allegedly showing some leading climate scientists trying to suppress criticism -- and new questions about the integrity of the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. After 55-plus inches of snow fell in the Washington area, critics are delighting in the irony, and those who warn of climate change are taking pains to say the snow fits the pattern of a warming world.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2009 | Jim Tankersley and Margot Roosevelt
The Environmental Protection Agency on Friday declared that industrial greenhouse gases are a danger to human health and well-being, opening the way to broad new regulations to reduce carbon dioxide and other planet-heating gases. The finding could lead to far-reaching rules that are likely to heavily affect cars and trucks, which account for nearly a quarter of the nation's greenhouse gas emissions, and utilities, which are responsible for more than a third.
OPINION
February 9, 2009
As President Obama pursues green infrastructure projects and other programs aimed at fighting climate change, he is eventually going to have to confront an unpleasant truth: None of it will matter unless the developing world, particularly China, does the same. With China having passed the U.S.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
The government's major financing agencies for overseas development projects reversed direction Friday, committing to scrutinize fossil-fuel facilities for their effect on global warming and pledging to help build renewable energy plants abroad. The decision was revealed in settlement agreements filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco in a lawsuit brought by two environmental groups, Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth, against the U.S.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2007 | Ken Kaye, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Unless greenhouse gases are sharply reduced in coming decades, Florida could face environmental catastrophe, with rising seas, increasingly violent weather and severe droughts, Gov. Charlie Crist said Thursday. That was the governor's opening statement at the two-day Serve to Preserve Florida Summit on Global Climate Change, which seeks to bring together political, business and environmental leaders to find alternative energy sources and urge conservation to combat the effects of global warming.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1997 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co.'s top executive said Monday that the United States should avoid being bullied by other countries into signing a treaty to combat global warming, because the agreement could jeopardize economic growth and jobs. Alex Trotman, Ford chairman and chief executive, said in a speech to the National Press Club that the economic consequences of an international treaty to combat global warming should not be ignored. "Environmental issues do have economic consequences," Trotman said.
OPINION
December 10, 2007 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
Is your marriage on the rocks? Are you and the spouse always fighting? Is the passion gone? A new study published by the National Academy of Sciences suggests that you should think twice before considering divorce. No, not because of the negative effects it may have on the children or even on your pocketbook, but of what it'd do to your poor mother. Mother Earth, that is. All kidding aside, the study's findings make sense.
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