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Global Positioning System Satellites

BUSINESS
March 6, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the pre-dawn hours of Sept. 1, 1983, Korean Air Lines transpacific Flight 007 strayed off course and deep into Soviet airspace over Sakhalin Island. A Soviet fighter pilot, apparently unable to see that the airplane was a commercial one, fired a single missile. The Boeing 747 went down and all 269 people aboard died in one of the Cold War's worst tragedies.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 1994
CUE Network Corp. said it has agreed to form a joint venture company to provide international paging and global positioning services in Singapore and throughout Southeast Asia. Other countries to be served by the new company, CUE Southeast Asia Partnership Ltd., include Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines and Vietnam. CUE's partner, a unit of a the Singapore trade union group National Trades Union Congress, operates that nation's first private radio station.
NEWS
February 7, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Andrea Donnellan kneels on the barren crest of Oat Mountain and, with her Powerbook computer coupled to a tiny satellite receiver, pinpoints the shards of Southern California's broken landscape with an unsettling accuracy. It is as she suspected. The 3,477-foot-tall mountain, heaving upward since the moment of the 6.6 Northridge earthquake last month, has grown another inch since she last checked. "This is mountain-building in progress," she said.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The corporate jet flew a curved, swooping approach route and settled down comfortably a few feet above Ontario International Airport's Runway 8 Left. "Nothing to it," the pilot, Dave Maahs, said with a satisfied chuckle. It looked as though Maahs had just made a complex, well-executed landing approach--ending up no more than three feet to the right of the runway center line--at one of Southern California's major commercial airports.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, participants in an around-the-world air race flew across the former Soviet Union, providing a dramatic illustration of the newfound freedom of the skies in a region where foreign planes were once shot down. But the pioneering course they charted reflected more than the collapse of communism: It heralded the advent of a satellite navigation technology initially developed by the United States for Cold War military missions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1992 | LILY DIZON
Two anti-war activists pleaded guilty Monday in federal court to charges that they struck a military satellite at Rockwell International with axes, causing about $2 million in damage. Before entering their pleas in U.S. District Court, Peter A. Lumsdaine, 37, and Keith J. Kjoller, 31, both of Santa Cruz, stood outside the Santa Ana courthouse and told reporters they stand by their actions.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf war is posing serious problems for Southland companies that depend on satellites for everything from steering oil tankers to mapping out potential freeway routes, according to military and commercial sources. Some industries rely heavily on a group of 16 military-run satellites known as the Global Positioning Systems, and a realignment of the satellites to aid Operation Desert Storm is already causing problems for survey companies and civil engineers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
There was a quarter moon that night, but a thick fog blotted it from view. At 5:30 a.m. a computer science technician named Valerie Wong stood in a parking lot in Monrovia and pointed a gray battery-powered plastic box at the heavens and homed in on some military satellites. She was trying to find out, literally, where she stood. The screen flashed 34 degrees, 8.38 minutes north; 117 degrees, 59.77 minutes west. "This is going to be accurate within 30 meters," Wong said.
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