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Global Positioning System Satellites

NEWS
October 8, 1999 | Reuters
A Delta 2 rocket lifted off Thursday from Cape Canaveral carrying a $42-million Global Positioning System satellite, built by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space, that will join the U.S. military's orbiting constellation of navigation satellites.
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BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new way of linking satellites and cellular phones in an emergency--or perhaps finding a place for dinner--got a big boost Wednesday from the Federal Communications Commission. By a 5-0 vote, the commission allowed the introduction of cell phones that use global positioning system satellites to automatically flash their locations to 911 operators.
NEWS
August 22, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The network of navigational satellites known as the Global Positioning System quietly passed through a critical transition Saturday as its synchronized clocks rolled back to a date of zero, causing few if any problems, according to initial reports. The network of 27 satellites, now widely used by the military, businesses and consumers to find exact locations on the planet, had been a source of concern because the system faced a millennium bug-like problem that occurs about every 20 years.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several federal agencies issued a warning Thursday to hikers, boaters, drivers and others who use the global positioning system to beware of the possibility that their devices may malfunction Aug. 21-22 because of an unusual phenomenon known as "End of Week Rollover." The rollover problem stems from the original design of the GPS, which calculates the date by counting the number of weeks from Jan. 6, 1980. After the 1,024th week--about 20 years--the system resets back to zero.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
Whoever said getting back to nature had to mean leaving modern technology behind? One of the newest gadgets for outdoorsmen of all types is Blazer12, a global positioning system device that will lead you back to your favorite trail head, campsite or fishing spot. The unit--about the size of a TV remote control with a thick antenna--uses a constellation of 24 military satellites to keep track of precise locations on the ground. Simply hit the "Mark" key at a place worth returning to.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Trimble Navigation Ltd. said it will partner with Germany's Siemens to boost sales of global positioning system devices, which can be used to track locations worldwide. Sunnyvale-based Trimble said it will work with the semiconductor unit of Siemens to design and manufacture new versions of GPS systems. It did not disclose the terms of the alliance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1997 | DAVID COLKER
Map making has leaped into the digital age, substituting satellites and computers for the methods perfected over the centuries by explorers. Instead of surveying instruments and long treks into remote terrain, the contemporary cartographer makes use of digital imaging, satellite reconnaissance and vast databanks on silicon chips. High-end cars increasingly come with global positioning system units, which use satellites to determine precisely where the car is.
NEWS
April 27, 1997 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is little but prairie surrounding the carefully guarded buildings. From the time authorized personnel slide their personalized badges through the card reader and punch in a four-digit access code, they have 15 seconds to pass through a door leading to the master control station. Down a long hallway, seven people in blue jumpsuits work at computer terminals.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sunnyvale-based Trimble Navigation Ltd. said it will resume shipments of global positioning system units to American Mobile Satellite Corp., ending a dispute that included litigation. Trimble, which makes satellite-based navigation and communication systems, said it will begin shipping its Galaxy units in March. The Galaxy units are used to precisely determine location and facilitate data transmissions. Reston, Va.
NEWS
June 4, 1996 | From staff and wire reports
The federal government unveiled a state-of-the-art urban air transit system that will allow satellite-guided helicopters to thread the skies over Atlanta during this summer's Olympic Games. The $10-million research project, the Atlanta Short Haul Transportation System, employs global positioning technology that can guide as many as 50 helicopters across the urban landscape at altitudes too low for conventional air traffic control.
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