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Global Warming

NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
On what political tout sheet is North Carolina listed as a swing state? Because it looks like it's already swung, and not in the direction of the Democrats, who hold their convention there in September. First came last month's vote to put a ban on same-sex marriage in the state's Constitution (a San Diego church has put up a billboard in Charlotte, the site of the Democratic convention, apologizing for the "narrow-minded, judgmental, deceptive, manipulative" vote). Now the state's Legislature is considering a law that would, for all intents and purposes, give all the legislators doctorates in climatology.
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SCIENCE
November 13, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Society has slowed down global warming several times over the last century without even trying, new research says. A study found that the rate of global warming has ratcheted down in response to major world events, including the two world wars, the Great Depression and, most recently, a global ban on ozone-depleting substances. Researchers attribute the most recent slowdown, since the late 1990s, at least in part to the decline in emissions of chlorofluorocarbons, greenhouse gases that were phased out under the 1989 Montreal Protocol . The international treaty was not intended to fight climate change, but to protect the atmosphere's ozone layer.
SCIENCE
August 17, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Global warming has subtly altered the taste and texture of Japanese apples over the last 40 years, although consumers may not realize it, according to new research. A study published in Scientific Reports concluded that climate change was likely responsible for earlier apple tree blooms and warmer growing seasons in Japan, as well as softer and less acidic apples. "The taste and textural attributes of apples in the market are undergoing change from a long-term perspective, even though consumers might not perceive these subtle changes," wrote lead study author Toshihiko Sugiura, a fruit tree researcher at Japan's National Agriculture and Food Research Organization.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON - Global warming and clean energy should be priorities for Congress and the president, a majority of Americans said in a recent survey. In the survey, released Tuesday by Yale and George Mason universities, 70% of American adults say global warming should be a priority for the nation's leaders, while 87% say leaders should make it a priority to develop sources of clean energy. Those support levels have dropped by 7% and 5%  respectively  since fall. Six in 10 Americans want the U.S. to reduce greenhouse gas emissions regardless of other countries' emissions efforts, according to the survey.
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