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Global Warming

OPINION
July 2, 2012
It's not just about the polar bears anymore. There was a time when the conversation about global warming was dominated by news about the Arctic, where its effects are the most easily visible to the lay public. The narrative involved shrinking glaciers and the ferocious white bears that live part of their lives on drifting ice floes that now are melting. But polar bears are far away and ice is just, well, ice. So it would be a good idea for the public - and especially Southern Californians - to pay rapt attention to several reports published within the last couple of weeks that bring the reality of climate change from the polar ice caps to our backyard.
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NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Wes Venteicher
WASHINGTON - Global warming and clean energy should be priorities for Congress and the president, a majority of Americans said in a recent survey. In the survey, released Tuesday by Yale and George Mason universities, 70% of American adults say global warming should be a priority for the nation's leaders, while 87% say leaders should make it a priority to develop sources of clean energy. Those support levels have dropped by 7% and 5%  respectively  since fall. Six in 10 Americans want the U.S. to reduce greenhouse gas emissions regardless of other countries' emissions efforts, according to the survey.
SCIENCE
November 13, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Society has slowed down global warming several times over the last century without even trying, new research says. A study found that the rate of global warming has ratcheted down in response to major world events, including the two world wars, the Great Depression and, most recently, a global ban on ozone-depleting substances. Researchers attribute the most recent slowdown, since the late 1990s, at least in part to the decline in emissions of chlorofluorocarbons, greenhouse gases that were phased out under the 1989 Montreal Protocol . The international treaty was not intended to fight climate change, but to protect the atmosphere's ozone layer.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Lubbock, Texas When Katharine Hayhoe was faced with telling a group of petroleum engineers in the heart of the Texas oil patch that the main culprit for climate change is humanity's consumption of fossil fuels, she expected pushback. "Aren't you scientists just in this for the money?" one older man asked — the latest insult after a string of anonymous emails asserting that she and other climatologists were corrupt liars. Most climatologists refuse to answer skeptics, preferring to let the research speak for itself.
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