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NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A daily glucosamine drink supplement failed to prevent deterioration of knee cartilage, reduce bone bruises or ease knee pain, according to a recent short-term study of the popular, if controversial, dietary product.  In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology , authors studied the effects of glucosamine hydrochloride on a group of 201 adults for six months. "Our study found no evidence that drinking glucosamine supplement reduced knee cartilage damage, relieved pain or improved function in individuals with chronic knee pain," said the study's lead author, Dr. C. Kent Kwoh, professor of medicine and medical imaging at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.
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NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A daily glucosamine drink supplement failed to prevent deterioration of knee cartilage, reduce bone bruises or ease knee pain, according to a recent short-term study of the popular, if controversial, dietary product.  In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology , authors studied the effects of glucosamine hydrochloride on a group of 201 adults for six months. "Our study found no evidence that drinking glucosamine supplement reduced knee cartilage damage, relieved pain or improved function in individuals with chronic knee pain," said the study's lead author, Dr. C. Kent Kwoh, professor of medicine and medical imaging at the University of Arizona College of Medicine.
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NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Many people who suffer with lower back pain rely on glucosamine supplements for some relief. But does the stuff really work? A new study shows that glucosamine was no different from a placebo in treating lower back pain. The study, released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., was a large, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial that included 250 adults with chronic lower back pain. It was conducted at the Oslo University Outpatient Clinic in Norway. Chronic lower back pain plagues millions of people in the U.S., and treatments include physical therapy, medication and the use of glucosamine supplements.
HEALTH
August 30, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I took glucosamine and chondroitin for about seven months. I had gotten little relief for my back pain, but I was willing to continue it to see if eventually it would help. Around that time, I had blood work done and found that my cholesterol had jumped from under 200 to 239. I had made no changes in lifestyle or diet other than these supplements. I haven't taken any since. Dozens of readers report a rise in cholesterol associated with taking glucosamine and chondroitin. In many cases, cholesterol levels go back down after the supplements are discontinued.
HEALTH
November 4, 2002 | Dianne Partie Lange
People with arthritis who take glucosamine have said it makes their joints feel better, and some studies have confirmed these reports. Now a three-year study at the Prague Institute of Rheumatology has confirmed that glucosamine appears to stop the narrowing of the space in the knee joint that typically occurs with arthritis.
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Elizabeth Large, The Baltimore Sun
If you'd guessed 20 years ago what the "it" drug of the new millennium would be, at least for baby boomers, you probably wouldn't have said a pill made from shellfish shells and cow trachea. The pill -- a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin -- is popular with aging boomers because it may ease the pain of arthritis. It's also the treatment of choice for their beloved aging pets. Can you get any more with-it than that?
HEALTH
October 15, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Americans with osteoarthritis of the knee may need to wait a little longer for proof that three common approaches actually work. In a review of 42 randomized controlled trials on hyaluronic acid injections, 21 studies on the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin and 23 articles on arthroscopy, researchers at the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assn.
HEALTH
November 21, 2005 | Jonathan Bor, Baltimore Sun
A clinical trial of the popular dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin found no evidence that they're better than placebos in easing arthritic knee pain, the study's lead investigator has reported. The good news: Like placebos, the supplements aren't harmful either. The government-sponsored trial involving 1,600 arthritis sufferers at 16 medical centers across the country was designed to see whether the supplements lived up to their billing as potent weapons against arthritis.
HEALTH
July 19, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My husband and I are in our 50s. We are having much pain from arthritis. His is in his knees. I have had my thumb joint removed due to osteoarthritis, and now I am told I need hip-replacement surgery. Glucosamine and chondroitin seemed to help for a while, but now we are back to limping. What can you tell us about the benefits and risks of these supplements? Are there any other options? A large government-sponsored study of glucosamine and chondroitin for arthritis of the knee determined that these supplements were no better than a placebo for mild to moderate arthritis (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases online, June 4)
HEALTH
August 30, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I took glucosamine and chondroitin for about seven months. I had gotten little relief for my back pain, but I was willing to continue it to see if eventually it would help. Around that time, I had blood work done and found that my cholesterol had jumped from under 200 to 239. I had made no changes in lifestyle or diet other than these supplements. I haven't taken any since. Dozens of readers report a rise in cholesterol associated with taking glucosamine and chondroitin. In many cases, cholesterol levels go back down after the supplements are discontinued.
HEALTH
July 19, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My husband and I are in our 50s. We are having much pain from arthritis. His is in his knees. I have had my thumb joint removed due to osteoarthritis, and now I am told I need hip-replacement surgery. Glucosamine and chondroitin seemed to help for a while, but now we are back to limping. What can you tell us about the benefits and risks of these supplements? Are there any other options? A large government-sponsored study of glucosamine and chondroitin for arthritis of the knee determined that these supplements were no better than a placebo for mild to moderate arthritis (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases online, June 4)
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Many people who suffer with lower back pain rely on glucosamine supplements for some relief. But does the stuff really work? A new study shows that glucosamine was no different from a placebo in treating lower back pain. The study, released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., was a large, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial that included 250 adults with chronic lower back pain. It was conducted at the Oslo University Outpatient Clinic in Norway. Chronic lower back pain plagues millions of people in the U.S., and treatments include physical therapy, medication and the use of glucosamine supplements.
HEALTH
February 22, 2010 | Elena Conis
With more than 46 million Americans diagnosed with arthritis, the market for joint pain supplements is enormous — and only set to grow as baby boomers age. "I call it the quiet epidemic," says Dr. Thomas Vangsness, professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of sports medicine at the USC Keck School of Medicine. But while the variety of joint pain supplements just keeps growing, just a few have been well studied, and even fewer have been shown to work. Yucca root, mangosteen juice and fish oil supplements are often touted as remedies for joint pain, but although some lab studies indicate they might help fight inflammation, there's no solid evidence that any of them relieve the symptoms of arthritis in people.
HEALTH
October 15, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
Americans with osteoarthritis of the knee may need to wait a little longer for proof that three common approaches actually work. In a review of 42 randomized controlled trials on hyaluronic acid injections, 21 studies on the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin and 23 articles on arthroscopy, researchers at the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assn.
HEALTH
November 21, 2005 | Jonathan Bor, Baltimore Sun
A clinical trial of the popular dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin found no evidence that they're better than placebos in easing arthritic knee pain, the study's lead investigator has reported. The good news: Like placebos, the supplements aren't harmful either. The government-sponsored trial involving 1,600 arthritis sufferers at 16 medical centers across the country was designed to see whether the supplements lived up to their billing as potent weapons against arthritis.
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Elizabeth Large, The Baltimore Sun
If you'd guessed 20 years ago what the "it" drug of the new millennium would be, at least for baby boomers, you probably wouldn't have said a pill made from shellfish shells and cow trachea. The pill -- a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin -- is popular with aging boomers because it may ease the pain of arthritis. It's also the treatment of choice for their beloved aging pets. Can you get any more with-it than that?
HEALTH
February 22, 2010 | Elena Conis
With more than 46 million Americans diagnosed with arthritis, the market for joint pain supplements is enormous — and only set to grow as baby boomers age. "I call it the quiet epidemic," says Dr. Thomas Vangsness, professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of sports medicine at the USC Keck School of Medicine. But while the variety of joint pain supplements just keeps growing, just a few have been well studied, and even fewer have been shown to work. Yucca root, mangosteen juice and fish oil supplements are often touted as remedies for joint pain, but although some lab studies indicate they might help fight inflammation, there's no solid evidence that any of them relieve the symptoms of arthritis in people.
HEALTH
July 19, 2010 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Painful arthritis of the knee is on the rise — as is the number of middle-aged people who refuse to let the condition interfere with their favorite sports or exercise. Active people in their 40s and 50s are challenging doctors to provide treatments that not only keep them walking but keep them running and jumping as well. Joints rely on slippery caps of cartilage that allow bones to glide past each other with a minimum of friction. "It's the smoothest material known to man," says Dr. Andrew Spitzer, director of the joint replacement program at the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center in Los Angeles.
HEALTH
November 4, 2002 | Dianne Partie Lange
People with arthritis who take glucosamine have said it makes their joints feel better, and some studies have confirmed these reports. Now a three-year study at the Prague Institute of Rheumatology has confirmed that glucosamine appears to stop the narrowing of the space in the knee joint that typically occurs with arthritis.
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