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Glucose Levels

NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Smart phones have already supplemented the doctor’s office and personal computers as sources of health advice — and now it appears car companies are driving into the on-the-go consumer health market. Ford is developing a way to display pollen counts and other allergen levels to drivers using its existing link to smart phone apps, the car company announced Wednesday. Ford has also made a prototype to synchronize glucose monitoring devices via Bluetooth. The car displays glucose levels and sounds an alert if they fall too low. A statement from Ford explains how this technology can help diabetics and allergy sufferers: “For people with diabetes and their caregivers, constant knowledge and control of glucose levels is critical to avoiding hypoglycemia or low glucose, which can cause confusion, lightheadedness, blurry vision and a host of other symptoms that could be dangerous while driving.
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SCIENCE
October 24, 2009 | Shari Roan
A medication that is under review by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of type 2 diabetes may also promote weight loss, according to a study published online Thursday in the Lancet. The drug, liraglutide, was approved earlier this year in Europe for the treatment of diabetes. It is marketed under the brand name Victoza. Liraglutide is an injected drug that stimulates the release of insulin when glucose levels become too high. It also helps curb appetite. In the new study, researchers in Denmark assigned 564 obese people to one of four liraglutide doses, a placebo or the weight-loss drug orlistat.
NEWS
August 9, 1992
As an Hispanic who has been recently diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, I read your article ("Minority Groups at Risk of Diabetes," July 21) with interest. I am currently enrolled in a research study at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, that is investigating the effects of the drug glipizide on the blood-glucose levels in minorities. Through education received here, I have learned that with proper diet, medication, exercise, constant personal monitoring of my blood-sugar levels, and most of all, attitude adjustment, I will live a productive life.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | Associated Press
Diabetics who have been barred from driving trucks or buses across state lines will be allowed to operate the vehicles if they meet stringent conditions, the federal government announced Wednesday. The Federal Highway Administration said insulin-using diabetics who qualify will be given waivers to drive the vehicles in interstate commerce for three years while the agency seeks to develop a permanent rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998
UCLA was awarded a $3.5-million grant Tuesday to study how the brain responds to traumatic injury. The five-year grant from the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke will fund a collaborative study by the Division of Neurosurgery and the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology. "There is a traumatic brain injury occurring once every 10 seconds in the United States," said Donald Becker, chief of neurosurgery.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Abbott Laboratories said Monday that it had received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for a new blood glucose monitoring system -- an announcement that came as its stock rose to a six-month high. The go-ahead added to Abbott's momentum after the release of positive results from the first trial of its ZoMaxx device, a drug-coated stent intended to unclog arteries to the heart, Sunday at the American College of Cardiology's annual meeting in Atlanta.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Tucking into a breakfast of buttermilk pancakes and maple syrup, or a great bowl of white pasta for lunch, not only sends your blood sugar soaring--and then, suddenly, plummeting. Four hours after you've put down your fork, such a meal makes you hungrier than if you'd eaten one with more protein and fiber and fewer carbohydrates, a new study finds. The study also demonstrates that four hours later, the echo of that meal activates regions of the brain associated with craving and reward seeking more powerfully than does a meal with a lower "glycemic load.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Contestants on the reality TV program "The Biggest Loser"not only lost weight fast, they "rapidly and substantially" lowered their blood pressure and improved their metabolic function, the physician who is the show's medical consultant reported Friday to the American Assn. of Clinical Endocrinologists. Dr. Robert Huizenga, the medical director of the NBC program and several other shows, including Univision's " Dale Con Ganas ," says the combination of moderate calorie restriction and roughly four hours of daily exercise yields bigger health gains, more cheaply and with fewer complications, than bariatric surgery.
HEALTH
November 15, 2004 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
All right, it's not the fountain of youth. But a study published in the Nov. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. has found that DHEA, a hormone widely marketed as a nutritional supplement, decreases belly fat and improves the body's use of insulin among the elderly when taken daily for six months. Earlier studies have shown that DHEA supplementation led to improved bone density and an enhanced sense of well-being. "We were surprised that there was such an effect," said Dr.
NEWS
June 24, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Weight-loss surgery can cure many obese people -- perhaps more than 60% of them -- of their diabetes, at least in the short term, suggests a new analysis of several studies. Though previous research had suggested that weight-loss surgery could reverse diabetes, researchers from the Netherlands have formalized the evidence a bit through a review of nine studies published in the June Archives of Surgery . Among the studies included in the analysis, 424 people with Type 2 diabetes underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, in which the surgeon creates a small pouch in the stomach that restricts food intake and bypasses part of the small intestines to cut down on absorption.
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